February 20, 2013

Why the Government of Puerto Rico is Anti Gay

                                                                                 


Without Editorializing the information below, which is how the law and government of Puerto Rico works;  I would direct the reader to see what party the Governor, House of Representatives and the Senate are politicly held. They are all right now being held by one party, the NPP. NPP is Republican, PDP are the Democrats and the PIP is the Independence party,  which wants independence from  the USA. It does not nor it ever had much political power.  I draw the attention to those facts, because Im sure that if the Republican party here was for Legal Rights for gays, the REpublicans in PR would follow suit.
PR has no Representatives in the government of the US.  They are only allowed observers. They are force to take what left overs of what ever the Congress in the uSa wants to give them.  by adamfoxie* and facts by the Puerto Rican Government Site


Chief of State: President of the United States.
Head of Government: Governor, elected by the voters to a four-year term.
Government Officials:
    PresidentPresident Barack H. OBAMA (since 20 January 2009)
    Vice President  Joseph R. BIDEN (since 20 January 2009)
    GovernorLuis Fortuño (since 2 January 2009)
Government Form: Republican; executive, legislative, and judicial branches.
Ruling Party: New Progressive Party (NPP)
Percentage of votes cast in last election: (2008)
New Progressive Party (NPP): 48.4%
Popular Democratic Party (PDP): 43.4%
Puerto Rican Independence Party (PIP): 4.4%
Puerto Ricans for Puerto Rico Party (PPR): 2.1%
Independent: 0.9%
Others: 0.0
House of Representatives Seats: (51 members)
Popular Democratic Party: 14 Seats
New Progressive Party: 37 Seats (2008)
Senate: (27 members)
Popular Democratic Party: 5 Seats
New Progressive Party: 22 Seats (2008)
Next Election: November, 2012
Constitution: ratified 3 March 1952; approved by U.S. Congress 3 July 1952; effective 25 July 1952.
Suffrage: 18 years of age; universal; Puerto Ricans are U.S. citizens, but island residents do not vote in U.S. presidential elections.
Voter Participation: 79% (2008)
Puerto Rico is considered one of the highest records of voter participation in election processes in the world.
 .Registered: 2,458,036
Voters: 1,942,931
Turnout: 79% (2008)
Electoral Commission: "Comisión Estatal de Elecciones" 787-724-4979.
Fiscal Year: 1 July - 30 June
Legal System:
Puerto Rican civil and commercial codes are fashioned after Spanish models; penal, procedural, and public (including constitutional) law are fashioned after U.S. models.

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