Showing posts with label ISIS sloughier. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ISIS sloughier. Show all posts

September 28, 2015

15 Yr Old boy and 9 others Executed by Isis Accused of being Gay



                                                                     
                                                                     


The Islamic State is at it again – brutally killing men accused of being homosexuals. Their latest victim was just a teenager, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.

In a recent report, the group said ISIS militants executed a 15-year year boy and nine other men in two separate locations in Syria but on the same charges of being homosexuals.

 Director Rami Abdel Rahman of the monitoring group said the boy and two other men were killed in the town of Hreitan in northern Aleppo while the seven alleged other homosexuals were executed in Rastan, Homs province in central Syria.

Rahman told MailOnline that the boy had been arrested and locked up since last year. He said those killed in Rastan were shot in front of a large crowd that had gathered to witness the executions.

As of August this year, the ISIS has executed at least 30 people for being gay, the UN Security Council said. The group has deemed homosexuality punishable by death. It has also been persecuting other minorities throughout Iraq and Syria, especially Christians and Yazidis.

Jessica Stern, executive director of the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission, said accused homosexuals are being eliminated through stoning, firing squads, beheadings and pushing them off tall buildings.

The execution of alleged gays and the gruesome propaganda photos and videos earlier released by ISIS appear to be an attempt by the group to reinforce its rule of fear, Mail Online reported. Alleged gay people have also reportedly been stoned to death by crowds carrying out death sentences as directed by ISIS commanders.

The inhumane death sentences were done in different areas, including in the Iraqi city of Falluja and the ISIS de-facto capital Raqqa in Syria.

"At the executions, hundreds of townspeople, including children, cheered jubilantly as at a wedding," said Subhi Nahas, a refugee from the Syrian city of Idlib. "If a victim did not die after being hurled off a building, the townspeople stoned him to death. This was to be my fate too."

Another activist identified as Adnan from Iraq, bared that ISIS uses social media to hunt down gay people. "They are professional when it comes to tracking gay people. They hunt them down one by one. When they capture people, they go through the person's phone and contacts and Facebook friends.''

US Ambassador Samantha Power said at a recent UN meeting that it is time for the spotlight to be placed on ISIS treatment of gay people. "It's about time, 70 years after the creation of the UN, that the fate of LGBT persons who fear for their lives around the world is taking centre stage," Power said. “This represents a small but historic step,'' she said.

March 7, 2015

Amid Daily Attacks Syrian Gays Fear Isis the Worse


                                                                           

The photographs released by ISIS in its stronghold of Raqqa are dated March 2015. The first ones show a large crowd, mostly men, but also among them a handful of women and children, all looking up.

Three men on top of a building, faces covered in black balaclavas, stand on either side of their victim, while a fourth seems to be taking a photo or video.

Their victim is thrown off the building. In the last photograph, he is seen face down, surrounded by a small crowd of men, most carrying weapons, some with rocks in their hands. The caption reads "stoned to death."

The victim brutally killed because he was accused of being gay.

There are at least half a dozen documented cases of men being similarly killed by ISIS. What’s even more sickening for Nour, a gay Syrian man, is the onlookers’ reaction. 

"It's too much to watch, and people are just standing there in these images and watching, and they are not doing anything, and their facial expressions are really scary because they are not even scared of what is going on," says Nour, who's also an LGBT rights activist. "They might be a little bit excited or maybe happy to get rid of homosexuals in the city."

Though in Istanbul, fear of persecution continues to haunt Nour, who asked us to conceal his identity as he waits and hopes for asylum in America and continues to campaign for rights for people who are LGBT -- lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans.

A history of abuse
As a teenager, over a decade ago, Nour suffered because of his sexuality.

"The worst bullying was at school," he remembers. "I was approached in the street a number of times, verbally abused and sometimes physically abused."

There was no one to protect him. His family rejected his sexual orientation, his country criminalized it.

Article 520 of the Syrian Penal Code of 1949 states: "Any unnatural sexual intercourse shall be punished with a term of imprisonment of up to three years."

Nour left Syria in 2012, before ISIS took over huge swaths of the country, after seeing a video of two men being beheaded. According to the voice on the clip, they are accused of being spies. Then toward the end, the voice speaks about "shaking the throne of God."

"Whenever we hear this in video or audio, we know that this is exactly meant for gay people," he says. "It was the moment of clarity, the moment of understanding; this place is not safe anymore."

The pictures released by ISIS and other videos refer to gay men as the tribe of Lot, who, according to readings of the Quran and the hadith, or prophetic traditions, sinned by refusing Prophet Lot's call to cease their homosexual activity and led to the destruction of Sodom. One hadith states, "When a man mounts another man, the throne of God shakes."

Since the revolution turned war in Syria, the situation for the nation's LGBT community has become even more dire.

"LGBT people in Syria need help, and they need to be supported. We tried to reach out to some groups, international entities, and they said that LGBT people in Syria are not our priority, and that would mean that our lives are not worthy for them to rescue," Nour says.

This week, the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission, a nongovernmental organization based in New York, started "Don't Turn Away," an awareness-raising campaign calling for action to protect LGBT Syrians and Iraqis from ISIS' merciless brutality.

On its website, the group states, "What is clear is the Islamic State's intent -- to spread terror among an already persecuted population in the region and to warn against any kind of 'moral' transgression."

The commission is calling on governments and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees to expedite resettlement and refugee applications for LGBTs.

Driven away by threats
Sami and his partner are among those waiting. Dressed in matching outfits, they already consider themselves married, laughing about how they first met online. They too, like Nour, don't want their identities revealed.

When Sami's family found out about his relationship, he says, his brother tried to beat him up. He started to receive threatening phone calls from family and strangers.

This past summer, while the couple was walking in the streets in Damascus, a car tried to run them over.

"I was able to pull myself away, but my husband couldn't," Sami recalls. "The car hit his leg and he fell to the ground."

There is no doubt that it was a deliberate attempt to kill them. Two hours after the attack, Sami's phone rang.

"There was a man who said this time you could have made it, you could have survived, but the next time you will not."

The couple fled to Turkey a few months ago, but they can't shake the fear that their relationship could cost them their lives.

They share housing with other Syrian refugees, where they have to continue to pretend that they are straight. When the ISIS photographs emerged, one of their housemates made a sickening comment.

"He made an absurd joke about how he was so amused, had too much fun watching homosexuals. He says now gay men can fly."

They say they will never return to Syria. And neither will Nour.

"It's too damaging for my psychological state, because I have been abused too much from my family, friends, school. It’s not safe for me psychologically or physically," he says

By Arwa Damon and Zeynep Bilginsoy, CNN

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