Showing posts with label Gay Actors. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Gay Actors. Show all posts

May 3, 2019

Greg Berlani Comes Out and Says GAY Execs Blocked Him From Casting Gay Actors




Greg Berlanti

Though queer representation on television is at an all time high right now, the reality is that many times, gay and trans actors and actresses are only relegated to characters that match those roles. It’s for that reason, in fact, that some believe that queer and trans roles should only go to queer and trans actors — as without them they might not be cast at all. If you don’t believe us, director Greg Berlanti, who has headlined projects like Riverdale and Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, recently spoke out about his own experiences.
“Early on in my career there were gay execs and gay casting people who were the least likely to let me cast an actor they knew was gay in a straight part,” Berlanti, who also directed Love, Simontold The Hollywood Reporter in an interview. “These were the individuals who knew how important it would be.”
And that importance is significant; if an actor is cast as a gay character it can become an inextricable part of their brand. Daniel Franzese, who played Damian in Mean Girls said that he began to hit a “gay glass ceiling” after his success. People kept reaching out with projects for him to play what he saw as stereotypical gay characters based on tropes, and his refusal to take those jobs left him broke. And while eventually he was cast in a more complex role by way of HBO’s Looking, one option out of this would have been to get cast in something different all together; a straight role — the little work he did have on Sopranos dried up after Mean Girls.
But times have changed and in ways, Berlanti is calling the shots. He cast Nicole Maines as television’s first transgender superhero in Supergirl and routinely makes LGBTQ+ inclusion a priorityon his sets.

February 24, 2019

Adam Devine and Adam Gonzalez Want Movies With More Gay Dudes But Less Gay Dudes Killed Off

Adam Devine is just a boy, standing in front of audiences, asking them to love him.
Isn’t It Romantic stars Rebel Wilson as Natalie, a New York City architect who inexplicably finds herself stuck as the leading lady in an alternate PG-13 rom-com reality. Devine, 35, reunites with his Pitch Perfect co-star as Natalie’s best friend, Josh, who may also be her perfect match.
But as Devine tells NewNowNext, he’s been romancing gay admirers even before the homoerotic hijinks of Workaholics. In fact, he pretty much had us at “hello.”

Noel Vasquez/Getty Images

Isn’t It Romantic can be enjoyed by both hopeless romantics and cynical rom-com.... ........haters. How do you identify?

I straddle that fence. Honestly, I was always pretty indifferent when it came to rom-coms, but I didn’t know that some of my favorite movies, like The Wedding Singer, are full-on rom-coms. As a 13-year-old boy, I guess I wasn’t thinking about romance at all. Preparing for this movie, I realized that most of my favorite comedies are actually romantic comedies.

It’s fun to see you singing and dancing again with Rebel Wilson, especially after your absence from Pitch Perfect 3.

Rebel and I love working together. This was actually our fourth time working together after the first two Pitch Perfect movies, because one of the first TV shows she did in America was Workaholics. It feels like she’s my work wife and I’m her work husband. We’re so comfortable with each other, we improv really well, so I hope people are excited to see us back together.

There’s a recurring theme in your movies where you must compete for attention against hunky heartthrobs—Liam Hemsworth in Isn’t It Romantic, Robbie Amell in When We First Met, Zac Efron in Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates. Why does Hollywood do you dirty like that?

[Laughs] Look, I’m just glad I’m getting those roles because I’m definitely not getting the Liam Hemsworth roles, you know? I think it’s because I’m more relatable. Everybody has a buddy who’s like me—I hear that from people all the time—so I’m like someone you know and can hopefully root for.

Isn't It Romantic/Warner Bros.

For what it’s worth, I’d choose you every time, Adam.

Thanks, bud! I appreciate that. Believe me, I appreciate anybody who’d pick me over a Hemsworth.

Are you aware of your gay following?

Yeah, totally, and it’s very flattering to have that support. It’s funny because my first manager, TV producer Eddie October, is gay. After seeing me do a stand-up set at the Hollywood Improv Comedy Club when I was 21, he came up to me, like, “You’re going to be a star.” He was putting together this all-gay stand-up show that I couldn’t do because I’m a straight boy, but he wanted to make a tape of me doing stand-up, so we filmed my set at The Abbey in front of an all-gay audience. It was an awesome experience. Afterward, he was like, “You have no idea how many gay fans you’re going to have.” He called it.

RuPaul once called your Comedy Central series Workaholics “the gayest show I’ve ever seen in my life” and “gayer than Drag Race.” Was that a fair review?

It was the greatest compliment. I remember when RuPaul said that, because we all loved it. We were literally in the writers’ room high-fiving each other.

Working on episodes like “Gayborhood,” in which your clueless straight characters crash a Pride party and think they drunkenly had sex with each other, did you have LGBTQ viewers in mind?

Absolutely. With that episode in particular, we wanted to be the butt of the jokes. As straight white males, it’s easy to offend people and not even realize it, so we wanted to make sure that was coming from the best possible place. We felt like people really liked that episode and understood that we were only making fun of our idiotic characters.

Some of those gags could have been wildly offensive in the wrong hands.

Sure, but we just wanted to be funny. When you’re pushing any sort of comedic boundaries, some people are going to be offended. It’s better for clicks and likes nowadays if you’re offended by something, as opposed to just laughing and taking it for what it is. But the few times critics called us homophobic, it was straight critics being overly sensitive. The gay community has a great handle on comedy, and it’s cool that they’ve always been in our corner.

What does that homoerotic humor stem from?

You’re straight guys doing all this stuff that’s pretty gay—showering together after football practice, slapping each other in the dick—but you’re not secure enough in your own manhood to not nervously make jokes about it. It’s that insecurity, that eighth grade mentality, that’s so funny to me.

Game Over, Man!/Netflix

Your 2018 Netflix movie Game Over, Man!, which you also produced, had gay twists that weren’t essential to the plot. Why was it important to include that representation?

Well, we’d just never seen that in a movie before—henchmen who happened to be gay guys. Normally you don’t know a henchman’s backstory at all. We thought, well, gay people are everywhere, in all walks of life, why can’t there be two gay henchmen? And how funny would it be if I auto-erotic asphyxiated in front of them?

Blake Anderson’s character, Joel, also comes out to his buddies and becomes “the most powerful thing in the world: a pissed off gay dude.” What a great takeaway for a gay kid or bully who watches that.

I appreciate you saying that, because we came at that from a really good place, too. I also liked that when he finally comes out, his friends are like, “We know, dude. It’s fine.” 

You famously did full-frontal nudity in Game Over, Man! When you meet someone, does it ever cross your mind that they’ve probably seen your penis?

I don’t think about it unless they’re like, “Hey, I saw Game Over, Man! and really, really liked it.” If they lean into it like that, I’m like, oh, this guy’s talking about my dick. I actually did stand-up at a college right after Game Over, Man! came out. After a few minutes, I felt like the audience was a little tight, so I stopped, looked out at all these, like, 19-year-old college kids, and went, “Oh, you guys are being weird because you just saw my dick in a movie.” The place erupted.

Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic

Would you like to play a gay character?

Yeah, I’m down to play anything, as long as the script is great and I think I could bring something to the character. I certainly would never pass on a role because it was gay.

Pitch me a gay-themed movie starring you.

It seems like almost every gay movie is about some struggle—the struggle of coming out, how hard it is, people not understanding. I totally get that, of course, but I want to see a movie about two gay guys where being gay is not the main issue in their lives. I want to see them on a completely different journey that has nothing to do with them being gay.

Your move, Hollywood.

Right? I know I’d watch that.






by  
LOGO




July 10, 2018

Hollywood's Heartthrob Tab Hunter Died At 86


Tab Hunter, a Hollywood heartthrob of the 1950s who came out late in his life, has died at 86, according to a Facebook page linked to the actor. Hunter, who was born Arthur Gelien in 1931, rose to fame in the 1950s with roles as an approachable, all-American boy in movies like Battle Cry(1955) and The Burning Hills (1956) and Damn Yankees (1958). He also pursued a brief music career, landing a No. 1 hit with his song “Young Love.”While Warner Bros. publicly pushed Hunter into a pairing with Natalie Wood, Hunter had secret romances with other gay Hollywood actors, including Psycho star Anthony Perkins. Their relationship is set to be the subject of an upcoming J.J. Abrams–Zachary Quinto movie.
Hunter publicly discussed his life as a closeted man in Hollywood in his 2005 memoir Tab Hunter Confidential: The Making of a Movie Star, which was later adapted into a documentary in 2015. Hunter’s career had a brief resurgence in the 1980s when he appeared in two John Waters movies across from Divine, but the actor retired from Hollywood later in life, living with his partner Allan Glaser and their horse in Montecito.
Vulture

June 7, 2018

Rwandan President Meets With Ellen DeGeneres and Her Wife, A Move That Will Change Many LGBT Lives in This Country


It was a brief meeting. So unofficial that the international press barely covered it, yet this handshake has the potential to make thousands of lives better.
At the end of May, America’s favorite television host Ellen DeGeneres and her wife Portia de Rossi met Rwandan president Paul Kagame in the capital Kigali. The trip was part of DeGeneres’ work with the Ellen DeGeneres Wildlife Fund. The fund supports Rwanda’s mountain gorillas through the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund

View image on TwitterView image on Twitter


Encouraging to see the mountain gorilla population in the Virungas has grown 25% in the last eight years. Conservation efforts must continue. Thank you @TheEllenShow & Portia for coming to Rwanda & getting involved.

During the courtesy call, DeGeneres gave Kagame a T-shirt and the three posed for photos together. Ever-media savvy, Kagame’s people tweeted the meeting and posted the video on his YouTube channel, with no further detail from either. Yet, the short meet-and-greet between a lesbian celebrity couple and the world’s favorite African strongman has the potential to signify much more for gay rights in East Africa.
Last year, when a gay Rwandan TV journalist publicly proposed to her partner, their planned nuptials caused an uncomfortable debate and anger in a conservative society. Rwanda’s LGBTQI community has not faced the kind of persecution seen elsewhere in the region, but they became the target of backlash when the proposal challenged traditional notions of marriage.
“They wondered, ‘Who are they? Who is who in the relationship?’ We started to get harassed again, so we stopped going out in the street of Kigali, we were scared,” said Carter, a transgender man and rights activist, talking to Voice of America after the incident. Still, the public proposal empowered a community that has lived in the shadows. 
In 2008, for example, a Rwandan lesbian couple was reportedly prevented from attending a conference on lesbian feminist thinkers in the Mozambican capital Maputo. Today, while gay marriage isn’t legal in Rwanda, the government does recognize the LGBTQI community’s right to live openly.
Rwanda has done away with colonial-era anti-gay laws and Kagame said at a meeting in San Francisco in 2016 that being openly gay in Rwanda “hasn’t been our problem. And we don’t intend to make it our problem.” Rwanda is more progressive than its neighbors, but has yet to use its influence for the better in the region.
In 2017, Rwandan police arrested Ugandan LGBTQI activist Kasha Jacqueline Nabagesera, as she arrived in Kigali. They deported her back to Uganda, where homosexuality is illegal and violently repressed. In Uganda, police go as far as raiding gay pride events and gay film festivals.
Rwanda’s other neighbor, Burundi, has moved to strengthen its anti-gay legislation. In Kenya, homosexuality may not be persecuted, but it is openly frowned upon, most recently through the banning of the filmRafiki, a coming-of-age lesbian love story
Kagame’s legacy is divisive. His clean capital and well-run run country belie a regime accused of being repressive. The economy’s steady growth is used to justify extending Kagame’s term and the gender parity in his cabinet distracts from his silenced opposition.
In spite of all of this, Kagame holds much influence as a leader in his region, especially on gender rights. It’s why women frustrated by discrimination in the African Union turned to him specifically. And it’s why posing with DeGeneres, whose own coming out more than two decades ago changed American attitudes, could be more than a photo-op—it could be a regional turning point.

WRITTEN BY
Lynsey Chutel~~~~~~QUARTZ

September 1, 2017

Colton Haines Open Up About Being a Gay Actor in Hollywood







If you don’t know Colton Haynes by name — and he’d be the first person to bashfully tell you, you probably don’t — you at least know the 27-year-old actor by his familiar Hollywood Fable: farm boy turned New York model turned aspiring Los Angeles actor, a paragon of the digital age of the Instagrammable hunk, a slab of innocent Kansas marble sculpted by MTV and polished by The CW.

He’s a teen heartthrob and a fast-rising one at that, thanks to two major roles: His life-changing debut in 2011 as slithering jock Jackson Whittemore on MTV’s runaway hit Teen Wolf and his series regular gig on The CW’s Arrow as hooded vigilante Arsenal. Both roles made him digital teen royalty, bolstered by Haynes’ decided effort to embrace and interact with fans and his eccentric social media savviness (somewhere to the tune of some 4-million Instagram followers).
So why, then, would a rising prince of teen genre walk away from two red-hot TV gigs — arguably at their own peaks, and on the cusp of his own — and all but abdicate the throne?

“I asked to step away because I cared more about my mental and physical health than my career at the time,” the actor tells EW, opening up about his personal and professional life for the first time in quite some time. “I’ve had terminal anxiety my entire life. Physically ill, fainting. I’m 27 years old, and I have an ulcer. I had to step back.” Clinical anxiety and public pressure are a potent mix, but their effects may be worse for someone like Haynes — a gentle spirit in a threatening (or so he’s been told by many a casting director) build, someone who lost control of his own personal narrative somewhere along the way between Kansas and California. 


Social media afforded a temporary way to maintain his public voice after his departure from Arrow in 2015, and Haynes frequently made minor news over the year for his off-kilter Instagram posts (like his photo shoots with photographer Tyler Shields or his now-famous Halloween costumes). He laughs about the strange themes of his social media decisions. “People think there’s this working machine behind it all, but the machine is my weird personality,” he chuckles. “I think I have a good outlook on life, and I like to share that.

There’s no filter. I mean, a couple of Instagram filters, but not an actual communication filter.”
But while social media has helped his career, it’s also gotten him into some trouble. Case in point: A Tumblr post in January sparked an Internet firestorm after a fan commented on Haynes’ “secret gay past,”regarding racy modeling photos Haynes took while underage. Without giving it much thought, Haynes offered a coy reply: “Was it a secret?” The comment was picked up by bloggers as his coming out — but it wasn’t. Not yet.

“It was a complete shock. I wasn’t ready to be back in the headlines,” says Haynes, who is, in fact, gay but has never publicly addressed his sexuality (and, like many others on his path, took advice early in his career to subdue it). “I should have made a comment or a statement, but I just wasn’t ready. I didn’t feel like I owed anyone anything. I think in due time, everyone has to make those decisions when they’re ready, and I wasn’t yet. But I felt like I was letting people down by not coming forward with the rest of what I should have said.” The headlines about Haynes turned vitriolic in the absence of an announcement, but he was in no place to make one: He had checked into rehab for anxiety and would be frequently back in the hospital over the next three months.

“People want you to be that GQ image that you put out, but people don’t realize what it’s like to act 24 hours a day. I’d go home and I was still acting,” he says gently. “People who are so judgmental about those who are gay or different don’t realize that acting 24 hours a day is the most exhausting thing in the world.” The truth is, Haynes has been out for most of his life — in high school, to his family and friends, to his cast members, to his Hollywood bosses (like Arrow creator Greg Berlanti, now one of his closest mentors). But as a green transplant in Hollywood in 2006, he wasn’t any more immune to the town’s well-chronicled discomfort with LGBT identity. 


Now, however, there’s a palpable energy around him, a positivity that gushes from a 27-year-old eager to start not just a new chapter, but perhaps a new book. He’s setting his eye on movies, on comedy, on theater and photography and music — all passions he’s keen to explore as a version nothing less than himself. He’s even returning to his fashion roots and starting his first clothing line for men and women. (And sure, he’s also up for a return to Arrow, should the show bring his character out of hiding: “Working for Greg was the greatest experience of my life, and when he offered me Arrow, it was a new beginning for me. I would love to do more. They know I love them. I’d go back in a second.”)

If his cyber clash with his own identity earlier this year forced him to take stock of his life, its after-effects are now on the positive upswing. “It took me so long to get to this point, but I’m doing so good,” says Haynes. “I’m happier than I’ve ever
If you don’t know Colton Haynes by name — and he’d be the first person to bashfully tell you, you probably don’t — you at least know the 27-year-old actor by his familiar Hollywood fable: farm boy turned New York model turned aspiring Los Angeles actor, a paragon of the digital age of the Instagrammable hunk, a slab of innocent Kansas marble sculpted by MTV and polished by The CW.

He’s a teen heartthrob and a fast-rising one at that, thanks to two major roles: His life-changing debut in 2011 as slithering jock Jackson Whittemore on MTV’s runaway hit Teen Wolf and his series regular gig on The CW’s Arrow as hooded vigilante Arsenal. Both roles made him digital teen royalty, bolstered by Haynes’ decided effort to embrace and interact with fans and his eccentric social media savviness (somewhere to the tune of some 4-million Instagram followers).
So why, then, would a rising price of teen genre walk away from two red-hot TV gigs — arguably at their own peaks, and on the cusp of his own — and all but abdicate the throne?

“I asked to step away because I cared more about my mental and physical health than my career at the time,” the actor tells EW, opening up about his personal and professional life for the first time in quite some time. “I’ve had terminal anxiety my entire life. Physically ill, fainting. I’m 27 years old, and I have an ulcer. I had to step back.” Clinical anxiety and public pressure are a potent mix, but their effects may be worse for someone like Haynes — a gentle spirit in a threatening (or so he’s been told by many a casting director) build, someone who lost control of his own personal narrative somewhere along the way between Kansas and California. 

Social media afforded a temporary way to maintain his public voice after his departure from Arrow in 2015, and Haynes frequently made minor news over the year for his off-kilter Instagram posts (like his photo shoots with photographer Tyler Shields or his now-famous Halloween costumes). He laughs about the strange themes of his social media decisions. “People think there’s this working machine behind it all, but the machine is my weird personality,” he chuckles. “I think I have a good outlook on life, and I like to share that. There’s no filter. I mean, a couple of Instagram filters, but not an actual communication filter.”
But while social media has helped his career, it’s also gotten him into some trouble. Case in point: A Tumblr post in January sparked an Internet firestorm after a fan commented on Haynes’ “secret gay past,”regarding racy modeling photos Haynes took while underage. Without giving it much thought, Haynes offered a coy reply: “Was it a secret?” The comment was picked up by bloggers as his coming out — but it wasn’t. Not yet.

“It was a complete shock. I wasn’t ready to be back in the headlines,” says Haynes, who is, in fact, gay but has never publicly addressed his sexuality (and, like many others on his path, took advice early in his career to subdue it). “I should have made a comment or a statement, but I just wasn’t ready. I didn’t feel like I owed anyone anything. I think in due time, everyone has to make those decisions when they’re ready, and I wasn’t yet. But I felt like I was letting people down by not coming forward with the rest of what I should have said.” The headlines about Haynes turned vitriolic in the absence of an announcement, but he was in no place to make one: He had checked into rehab for anxiety and would be frequently back in the hospital over the next three months.

“People want you to be that GQ image that you put out, but people don’t realize what it’s like to act 24 hours a day. I’d go home and I was still acting,” he says gently. “People who are so judgmental about those who are gay or different don’t realize that acting 24 hours a day is the most exhausting thing in the world.” The truth is, Haynes has been out for most of his life — in high school, to his family and friends, to his cast members, to his Hollywood bosses (like Arrow creator Greg Berlanti, now one of his closest mentors). But as a green transplant in Hollywood in 2006, he wasn’t any more immune to the town’s well-chronicled discomfort with LGBT identity. 

Now, however, there’s a palpable energy around him, a positivity that gushes from a 27-year-old eager to start not just a new chapter, but perhaps a new book. He’s setting his eye on movies, on comedy, on theater and photography and music — all passions he’s keen to explore as a version nothing less than himself. He’s even returning to his fashion roots and starting his first clothing line for men and women. (And sure, he’s also up for a return to Arrow, should the show bring his character out of hiding: “Working for Greg was the greatest experience of my life, and when he offered me Arrow, it was a new beginning for me. I would love to do more. They know I love them. I’d go back in a second.”)

If his cyber clash with his own identity earlier this year forced him to take stock of his life, its after-effects are now on the positive upswing. “It took me so long to get to this point, but I’m doing so good,” says Haynes. “I’m happier than I’ve ever been and healthier than I’ve ever been, and that’s what I care about.” been and healthier than I’ve ever been, and that’s what I care about.”



July 16, 2017

Homophobe James Woods Goes After Pro Gay Family Gets Response from Neil Patrick Harris



 Actors Neil Patrick Harris (left) and James Woods engaged in a Twitter feud over an Orange County family's picture of their son at a gay-pride parade. (Evan Agostini/Invision/AP and Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

 My  son usually gets stares/whispers in public, not the smiles/hugs/encouragement he received at his 1st https://raisingmyrainbow.com/2017/06/26/my-gender-creative-sons-first-pride/ 


Actors Neil Patrick Harris and James Woods James Woods {Homophobe and if you have seen him play a gay character,  ..He might have the genes} engaged in a Twitter feud this week over an Orange County family's picture of their son at a gay-pride parade.

Not the first time that he goes after someone gay:     (Tweeting about Anderson Cooper)        
Woods wrote: 'As his butt plug dislodges during a newscast' Alongside a gif of the CNN anchor rolling his eyesThe 70-year-old actor was lampooned by Twitter users for the lewd commentHe defended it on Saturday, accusing the 'liberals' of having a 'hissy fit' Cooper, 49, was interiewing Trump counselor Kellyanne Conway when he rolled his eye

The original photo shows the parents with their 10-year-old son holding signs that say "I love my gender creative son!" and "My son wears dresses & makeup ... get over it!"
Woods, who has appeared in dozens of films and TV shows since the early 1970s, is known for supporting conservative viewpoints on Twitter, where he has more than 723,000 followers.

He commented on the photo: "This is sweet. Wait until this poor kid grows up, realizes what you've done, and stuffs both of you dismembered into a freezer in the garage."

That triggered strong reactions on both sides, with one of the most prominent coming from Harris, who is openly gay and has 26.9 million followers on Twitter. He responded: "Utterly ignorant and classless, Mr. Woods. I'm friends with this family. You know not of what you speak, and should be ashamed of yourself."

The exchange has sparked an angry debate online, in tens of thousands of retweets, likes and comments.

Faced with the backlash, Woods did not back down, insisting that his comment was not based on homophobia, but on parents using their child as a propaganda tool.

He sent out multiple additional tweets defending and expanding upon his comments and his viewpoint:

"Using one's child as a social justice propaganda doll is tantamount to child abuse," Woods tweeted. "This is not about homophobia. Nice try though..."

He added: "For the record I have supported human rights of all stripes and persuasions, colors, creeds, choices and preferences my entire life. Period."

He also tweeted "Some children can be ruthlessly cruel to children who are simply different in any way. I humbly suggest making your child a target is unwise."

And added: "I spent my entire adult life in the New York theatre scene, kids. I have more gay friends than Liberace. So let's stop the homophobia train."

The mother in the original photo, Lori Duron, maintains a blog titled "Raising My Rainbow - Adventures in Raising a Fabulous, Gender Creative Son."

She's also written a book with that title, with a foreword written by Harris.

Duron told People magazine that Woods' tweet was "shocking" and said the actor was "hugely misinformed."

"We've spent seven years sharing our journey to the public," she told the magazine. "LGBTQ youth don't hurt their parents, they hurt themselves. We're trying to raise our son in way that he doesn't fall into those behaviors. His tweet was so uninformed. LGBTQ youth do not kill other people, they kill themselves."

"I feel like adults should know better," she added.

She also said her son CJ is not transgender, but is a boy who wants to be treated like a girl.


By ABC7.com staff


June 22, 2017

Sir Ian Mckellan Says It's un-American for Trump Not to Defend Gay Rights









During an interview at the Variety Studio in Cannes Lions, the actor Ian McKellen had harsh words for President Donald Trump if he fails to follow through — as seems to be the case — on a campaign promise to protect the rights of the LGBT community.
Asked about the administration’s attempts to roll back gay and transgender protections, McKellen said, “If what you’re saying is true, it’s appalling and quite unnecessary and very un-American. The gay rights movement began in America. It began in San Francisco, it began in Stonewall, the city where Donald Trump was born and thrived.”
The White House has refused to acknowledge June as Pride Month. In March, Trump quietly rolled back an Obama-era rule, Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Executive Order. Many argue that the move leaves female and LGBT employees of federal contractors venerable to discrimination. 

McKellen, the most recent openly gay actor to be nominated for an Oscar, admitted he’s not sure what Trump believes. “I can’t follow Mr. Trump,” McKellen said. “I don’t always understand what he says and when I do, I have to admit later that I got it wrong because he changed his mind or changed his mind about what he said. He’s a very bad communicator, at least to me. Get more straightforward, Donald. And then we can take you seriously.”

McKellen arrived at the annual advertising conference in the South of France with an initiative, co-sponsored by the European branding company the Brooklyn Brothers and TV production house Brown Eyed Boy, to solicit short films that re-imagine iconic characters as gay (winners will be broadcast on Facebook).
The actor known for playing Magneto in the “X-Men” franchise spoke about the lack of gay characters in major Hollywood tentpoles. “I wouldn’t say the films coming out of the mainstream are quite as related to what’s going on in the real world as I would like them to be,” McKellen told Variety. “One indication of that is LGBT people don’t really get quite a big enough say. If you’re one of those initials yourself, you do notice that actually, these movies are not about me at all.”
Hollywood has yet to greenlight a comic-book movie anchored by a gay superhero. “Frankly looking at the images of some of these superheroes it’s a surprise to me they aren’t gay,” joked McKellen.
He expressed disappointment that his costume for Magneto isn’t quite as flamboyant as it was in the comics. “I wasn’t allowed to wear that outfit,” McKellen said. “I don’t look like Magneto in the comics — always shot from the crotch level.”
McKellen had a suggestion for rebooting the James Bond franchise with a gay 007. “I do have an idea,” McKellen said. “I think Ian Fleming, who wrote the original books, knew all about [it]. I’m not sure subsequent actors have quite understood the joke, which is the same as Superman. James Bond is a wimp! He’s a silly Englishman that wants his martinis stirred. He changes his underwear, like Superman, and he can save the world. They all play it the same — he’s heroic all the way through. No, he’s not.”
“If you play James Bond as an outwardly camp, silly gay man that no one took seriously and then he turned out as many gay men are underneath their clothes — buff and strong and as hetero as any hetero — we might have a more truthful story than the one that has been told,” McKellen said.
Would he want to play this new Bond? “I’m not volunteering,” he said. “I’m insisting. No, I’m too old to play it. I can be on the periphery of this new version.”
With all the recent talk of diversity at the Oscars, one statistic still goes unnoticed. There hasn’t been an openly gay actor nominated for an Oscar in 15 years — since McKellen was recognized for his work in “Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring” as the wizard Gandalf.
“It’s hard isn’t it?” McKellen said. “It’s probably because there are few remaining very talented actors who aren’t quite out of the closet in the way one would like for them to be for their own health and good. I don’t think there’s anything sinister about it. I was only the second openly gay man to receive a knighthood. Records are being broken day by day.”

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