Showing posts with label Presidential Candidate 2020. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Presidential Candidate 2020. Show all posts

September 20, 2019

Pete Buttigieg has Been an Example as a Mayor, Patriot, Husband and Willing to Put His Life in The Line with or without Spurss


Straight as an arrow in what matters, his sense of decency, fairness and following laws he needs to enforce. We haven't had that! Why not this man Pete? Some LGBT says Pete has not been busy enough with the issues that affect us much but the thing is he has. If you come out particularly being in the military, married another man and live an exemplary life, you could not be a better gay. Then you go to public life where everything is scrutinized and hold against you (unless your name is Trump)_There is a job for all of us and holding signs up is not everyone jobs. Once we do what we ALL out to do, which is coming out each one of us finds in what way we can give, show the message of what lives we live. Monsters, pedophiles, can't teach children even though we have our own. By being us we teach those liers as what they are! I was shocked when I was first called an "activist" I was shocked and I could only laugh. The person that told me this was the father of my partner at the time. Religious southerners. He offered to get me a truck pay for it, pack me up could move me anywhere (I should have taken him on it). The house was half mine, but my mom getting sick all I wanted to do was to bring her to NYC for the attention she needed and I still lost her 7 months after I got back to NY. ıut whether we are called and activist which is a privilege and that is why I laughed when this man told me he'll move me out, I didn't feel the tittle fit me, but I was wrong.
                       






Steve Adler, Christopher Cabaldon, Nan Whaley and Sly James, Opinion contributors
USA Today


Pete Buttigieg is a role model to mayors. We proudly endorse him from heartland towns, coastal cities, and suburban communities across this country. 

As we face unprecedented challenges, America needs leadership in Washington that gets things done. That’s why we need a great mayor in the White House.

We are more than 50 mayors across the country — from Santa Monica, California, to Topeka, Kansas, to Hartford, Connecticut — who know that an executive with vision and proven ability to get results is the key to a bright future for our nation. We see exactly that in Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Indiana.
South Bend is a quintessential American city, with big challenges and ever bigger opportunities. It remains close-knit — people stop Pete on the street, give him ideas and feedback, and hold him accountable for everything from potholes to racial justice.
We have watched Mayor Pete over the past eight years, as his steady and inspired leadership has revitalized his city. It was no surprise to us when his constituents reelected him with 80% of the vote. Pete has transformed South Bend, and now he is showing what American leadership can and should be in the years ahead.
Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg addresses a crowd in Galivants Ferry, South Carolina, in September 2019. (Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images) 

South Bend is Buttigieg's success story

First, Mayor Pete puts practical solutions over partisan ideology. For mayors, politics isn’t a blood sport. While inaction and gridlock are the norm in Washington, mayors don’t have the option to kick the can down the road. Our residents expect electricity when they flip the switch, clean water from their taps and trash picked up regularly. It would be unthinkable for a mayor like Pete to shut down the government because of a petty ideological disagreement.
Pete’s vision for Medicare For All Who Want It is a great example of advancing progressive goals with a commitment to achieving results. By giving every American the choice to walk away from their private insurance and into a public alternative, Pete’s plan will make health care more affordable and universal while trusting Americans to do what’s right for them. While others may focus on what sounds good, Pete has always been about what works well. 


Second, Mayor Pete looks forward, not back. Like many of us, he comes from a heartland city decimated by automation and globalization. Pete carries South Bend’s history with him, but he also knows that neither South Bend nor our country can return to the past. Instead, he has helped shepherd his community through a dramatic turnaround. Anyone who visits his city can see firsthand that it is growing and innovating, and that unemployment is falling.

Third, Mayor Pete is deeply invested in making sure every American is heard and feels they belong — especially in marginalized communities. Mayors in diverse cities don’t see people as abstract categories. We see them as our pediatricians, Little League volunteers, the retired letter carrier who says hi to our kids — and act accordingly.

Mayor Pete, the role model

While Washington has ignored or exacerbated our immigration crisis, Pete created a municipal ID card so that undocumented residents could open bank accounts and fill prescriptions. And because Pete knows that population growth is the key to economic growth, his plan for rural America would provide Community Renewal Visas to bring immigrants to communities in need of revitalization.
In the wake of a tragic officer-involved shooting in South Bend, we have seen Pete engage in an honest dialogue about the shadow of racism. And he has backed up his words with concrete plans. His Douglass Plan is arguably the most comprehensive plan any candidate has offered to start dismantling systemic racism and directly invest in black Americans. It puts forward ambitious-yet-attainable goals — from tripling the number of entrepreneurs from underserved backgrounds, to creating health equity zones to cutting incarceration by 50%.
Finally, Pete understands the power of moral leadership. Mayors are walking symbols of their cities. When we cut a ribbon at a new factory, or comfort a grieving parent whose child was lost to gun violence, we are showing the people we represent that their community stands with them. That kind of empathetic leadership is desperately needed in the Oval Office.
For all these reasons, Mayor Pete has become a role model — and in some cases, a mentor — to mayors like us. We endorse him from heartland towns, coastal cities, suburban communities and every other corner of our great country. What’s more, in the spirit of the community of mayors, we are already offering Pete our best ideas and helping engage grassroots supporters all across the country.
We’re proud to stand together as "Mayors for Pete," and hope you’ll join us in supporting this bold and unifying leader who will help us write a better future.

*The mayors endorsing Pete Buttigieg include: Steve Adler (Austin, Texas), Nan Whaley (Dayton, Ohio), Christopher Cabaldon (West Sacramento, California), Justin Flippen (Wilton Manors, Florida), Christine Hunchsofsky (Parkland, Florida), Dean Trantalis (Fort Lauderdale, Florida), Betsy Hodges (Minneapolis, Minnesota), Annise Parker (Houston, Texas), Rob Moon (Palm Springs, California), John D’Amico (West Hollywood, California), Luke Bronin (Hartford, Connecticut), Liz Alpert (Sarasota, Florida), Michelle De La Isla (Topeka, Kansas), Jim Gray (Lexington, Kentucky), Patrick Wojahn (College Park, Maryland), John Cranley (Cincinnati, Ohio), Ian Baltutis (Burlington, North Carolina), John Hamilton (Bloomington, Indiana), Jacob Day (Salsbury, Maryland), Zach Vruwink (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin), Matt Shorraw (Monessen, Pennsylvania), Breea Clark (Norman, Oklahoma), Gabriel Quinto (El Cerrito, California), Joe Signorello (Roselle Park, New Jersey), John Harabedian (Sierra Madre, California), Mark Kleinschmidt (Chapel Hill, North Carolina), Layla Walz (Wells, Nevada), Lydia Lavelle (Carrboro, North Carolina), Suzanne Prentis (Lebanon, New Hampshire), Ross Swords, Jr (Brownsville, Pennsylvania), Leirion Gaylor Baird (Lincoln, Nebraska), Kristopher Larsen (Nederland, Colorado), Noam Bramson (New Rochelle, New York), Steve Hagerty (Evanston, Illinois), David Berger (Lima, Ohio), Tari Renner (Bloomington, Illinois), Sly James (Kansas City, Missouri), Andy Berke (Chattanooga, Tennessee), Daniel Yost (Woodside, California), Ted Ellis (Bluffton, Indiana), Hugh Wirth (Oakland City, Indiana), Ron Strouse (Doylestown, Pennsylvania), Beth Bashert (Ypsilanti, Michigan), Duane Rosenberg (New Carrollton, Maryland), Shawn Raup-Konsavage (Bernville, Pennsylvania), Dave Kitchell (Logansport, Indiana), Rosalynn Bliss (Grand Rapids, Michigan), Tom McDermott (Hammond, Indiania), Henry Schwaller (Hays, Kansas), Greg Goodnight (Kokomo, Indiana), Mark Barbee (Bridgeport, Pennsylvania), Jim Carruthers (Traverse City, Michigan), Gleam Davis (Santa Monica, California), Ryan Arndorfer (Britt, Iowa), Brent Bascom (Rising Sun, Indiana), Gay Ann Harney (Rockport, Indiana), Ron Meer (Michigan City, Indiana), Gabriel Greer (Peru, Indiana).


June 17, 2019

Pres.Candidate ‘Pete’ Believes If He Gets Elected President He Won’t be The First Gay One






Related image
 One of America’s most iconic Presidents, Abe’ also spent a large portion of his life spooning with men.
In his early adulthood, the President shared a bed with Joshua Speed – who later became a Congressman. Not forgetting his roots, Lincoln several times offered Speed a government appointment – only to be rejected every time.
Linclon also shared a narrow bed with companion Billy Greene in his ’20s.
Greene remarked of their cosy living situation: “When one turned over the other had to do likewise… his thighs were as perfect as a human being could be.” (Pink News)
                  



 
, USA TODAY

Mayor Pete Buttigieg's candidacy has fueled speculation about how the American electorate would react to its first gay president. 

But, according to Buttigieg, he would not be the first gay president. 

In an interview with "Axios on HBO" aired on Sunday evening, Buttigieg asserted that it's "almost certain" he would not be the first gay president. 

Buttigieg, the South Bend, Indiana mayor running for the Democratic nomination, had been asked if Americans might react adversely to his sexual orientation.

He responded: "I'll respond by explaining where I want to lead this country. People will elect the person who will make the best president. And we have had excellent presidents who have been young. We have had excellent presidents who have been liberal. I would imagine we've probably had excellent presidents who were gay – we just didn't know which ones." 

When asked specifically if the United States ever had a gay president, he said, "I mean, statistically, it's almost certain."

He wasn't sure which one, though.

"My gaydar even doesn't work that well in the present," Buttigieg added. 

Some have speculated, though, that Buttigieg would not be the first gay president. 

In a Washington Post column at the end of March, Ezekiel Emanuel, vice provost for global initiatives at the University of Pennsylvania, speculated that James Buchanan, who was president from 1857 to 1861, might actually have been the first gay president. 

Emanuel argued that Buchanan might have had a relationship with William Rufus King, a politician who served as a senator, ambassador, and Franklin Pierce's vice president briefly before King's death.

King and Buchanan lived together before Buchanan became president, and after the two stopped living together, Buchanan noted in a letter to a friend that he was now "'solitary and alone,' having no companion in the house with me. I have gone a wooing to several gentlemen, but have not succeeded with any one of them."

Buchanan also added that he would not be able to give "ardent or romantic affection" to a woman if they lived together.

May 22, 2019

Democrats Affirm The U.S. is Ready For A Gay President








A Word from the Publisher, Adam Gonzalez:

Having Americans vote twice for a black American man, a Young Man at That and then having the voters fall sleep and vote for a Tweeting crown which makes up as he goes like he did with the Casinos. What Experience did he have with casinos? This is a man who refused to serve but likes to have Generals around him to them fire or make them quit. He loves the title "commander in chief" like he was a real commander which has an experienced team which he consults before declaring war or making decisions which sometimes cannot be undone, a good example is North Korea, which he doesn't even talk about anymore. Nothing good to say, he laid the thousand year egg there. Not to take away from Mayor Pete and his commanding experience in the Armed Forces or his experience in serving as the chief executive of a city in trouble when he came in but not now. Yes, America is more than ready for a good looking, executive, experience in the military to take the oath of office. There won't be any nazis or ex nazis or people that can not tell the truth like the ATTORNEY GENERAL! They won't be any pictures of naked girls and he won't be grabbing them. Not even guys because he is married and believe in something I believe too and know all about it and that is being faithful to your spouse.  We won't have it easy with Pete as commander in chief because we will be paying what Donald is done to this country and all so the richest among all can make more money on the stock market. Yes, there are jobs and let the average American if he/she has to work more because the extra money either pumped into the economy by the last tax relieve for the rich or the money the economy makes. I also would love to call the president Pete. Love that name. Even the Catholic church would approve of a Peter in the White House (not that it matters).

(CNN by  LZ Granderson)I was at a political fundraiser in 2007, in the company of several deep-pocketed longtime donors. President George W. Bush was near the end of his second term and much of the conversation wasn't about the anemic economy, the wars we were engaged in or the policies of the people vying to take his place.

Instead, it was about electability and whether the country was ready to vote for a black or female president. 

Needless to say, we got our answer.

I was at a political fundraiser earlier this year, again nestled in among several longtime donors with deep pockets. President Trump was not viewed favorably by this crowd and much of the conversation wasn't about the Mueller report, the trade war we are engaged in or policies touted by the people vying to take Trump's place.
Instead, it was about electability and whether the country was ready for an openly gay president.

It makes sense that the millionaires in these spaces would hedge their bets based on the most pragmatic of questions: Can this person win? After all, a person doesn't get to be a one-percenter by making a habit of investing in companies they don't believe will turn a profit.

But I couldn't ignore the irony of hearing so many blue-state-living/rainbow-flag-adjacent /"love-is-love" liberals in one room dismiss Pete Buttigieg's bid for the White House largely because he's gay, even from those within the LGBTQ community.

Buttigieg brings a military record in Afghanistan front and center 
 
They like him. Hell, many even love him. But they don't believe the country's ready. Two of three Americans support same-sex marriage, including more than 80% of Democrats, and yet ...
In a Quinnipiac poll early this month, only 40% of Democrats and independents who lean Democratic thought the United States was ready to elect a gay president (though 86% of that same group said they were open to electing a gay president).

"We need to win," is what I've heard repeatedly over the past couple of weeks, even as Buttigieg has ascended from "Mayor Who?" to a candidate who has gained the collective recognition that he is one of the most impressive in the field. More than 1 million viewers tuned in his Fox News town hall on Sunday, and even hard-to-impress Chris Wallace found him compelling -- much to the consternation of the President.

Would this war vet who offered condolences to the people of France in French after the devastating Notre Dame fire be the front-runner if he weren't married to a man? Given his relative youth and position as the mayor of a small city, would he have graced the cover of Time magazine if he were not?

For all of the chatter about downplaying identity politics in the hope of rebuilding the blue wall in the Midwest, it has been my experience that despite the fact Buttigieg is a fairly successful elected official from the Midwest, it is precisely his identity as a gay man that gives many Democrats the greatest pause.

Pete Buttigieg: God does not have a political party
 
As someone who has worked in South Bend and written for the South Bend Tribune, I have a sense of the financial devastation that swept the area, especially for minorities. Buttigieg's policies may have helped revitalize the downtown area, improved infrastructure and brought tech jobs to an area that was heavily reliant on the auto industry, but it would not be unfair to characterize his time as mayor as not being overly beneficial to minorities.

But then again, front-runner Joe Biden helped write the 1994 crime bill that helped to lead to the mass incarceration of minorities -- and co-front-runner Bernie Sanders voted for it, so there's that. In fact, if an audit of policies and comments were performed on all the men and women running for president, you would be hard pressed to find one without a significant blemish.

A key difference here is that only Mayor Pete is being dismissed for who he loves by some of the very people who claim no one should be dismissed for who they love.

Pete Buttigieg on faith, his marriage, and Mike Pence
 
The Democrats can call it pragmatism, they can call it being politically savvy, they can call it playing the odds... just as long as they are also being honest about the nature of the friendly fire directed at Buttigieg's candidacy. Again, if his executive inexperience or lack of substantive policy talking points were the main question marks, I would not have felt compelled to write this. But that's not what I'm hearing.

Yes, there is a legitimate question about whether or to the country is ready to elect a gay president. But there is also a legitimate question about whether Democrats -- for all their talk -- believe it's worth fighting for one.



April 27, 2019

Pete Buttigieg a Married Christian is Driving The Religious Right Waco





The only Democrat talking at length about his faith in the 2020 primary also happens to be the only gay candidate in the race. And he's one of the few from a red state.

South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg is an Episcopalian who can freely quote Bible verses. He's also a presidential candidate who embraces his husband on stage at campaign rallies.
Combining homosexuality and Christianity might be the most natural thing in the world for Buttigieg and millions of gay Americans, but it is an iconoclastic development in American politics, where generalizations about religious freedom have in recent years been used specifically to fight advances in LGBTQ rights.

For some on the religious right, like Franklin Graham, Buttigieg's identity, while it's shared by many gay Americans of faith, does not compute.
Graham, in a series of critical tweets, said that being a gay Christian "is something to be repentant of, not to be flaunted, praised or politicized."

@Franklin_Graham
 Presidential candidate & South Bend Mayor @PeteButtigieg is right—God doesn’t have a political party. But God does have commandments, laws & standards He gives us to live by. God doesn’t change. His Word is the same yesterday, today & forever. 1/3 https://www.cnn.com/2019/04/23/politics/buttigieg-god-political-party/index.html …

8,753
11:13 AM - Apr 24, 2019
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Pete Buttigieg: 'God doesn't have a political party'
Pete Buttigieg opened up about his faith Monday night, expressing confidence that he will be able to unite many different groups of people because "God does not have a political party."
cnn.com

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Franklin Graham
@Franklin_Graham
 Mayor Buttigieg says he’s a gay Christian. As a Christian I believe the Bible which defines homosexuality as sin, something to be repentant of, not something to be flaunted, praised or politicized. The Bible says marriage is between a man & a woman—not two men, not two women. 2/3

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11:15 AM - Apr 24, 2019
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Franklin Graham
@Franklin_Graham
 The core of the Christian faith is believing and following Jesus Christ, who God sent to be the Savior of the world—to save us from sin, to save us from hell, to save us from eternal damnation. 3/3

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11:16 AM - Apr 24, 2019
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Graham's position is ironic and hypocritical given his and the religious right's embrace of Donald Trump as President.
No one should presume to know another person's faith, but it is a statement of fact that Trump is a thrice-married megalomaniac who is certain in his infallibility and has mangled Bible verses when he's tried to read them out loud.

But conservative faith leaders have pushed Trump and applauded him in particular for his selection of conservative Supreme Court justices like Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, who they hope will challenge court precedent on abortion and marriage equality.
Buttigieg has poked at this hypocrisy, questioning whether Trump believes in God. He's brought attacks on Vice President Mike Pence, who has joined the fight against gay rights and who wears his faith -- he is an evangelical Christian -- on his sleeve.
 
"I hope that Pete will offer more to the American people than attacks on my Christian faith or attacks on the President as he seeks the highest office in the land," Pence told CNN's Dana Bash after Buttigieg's criticism, later adding, "he'd do well to reflect on the importance of respecting the freedom of religion of every American."
 
Comments from leaders like Graham, a supporter of Trump who is now saying Buttigieg's interpretation of faith is flawed, will complicate Pence's argument that his own faith is being targeted by Buttigieg.

What drew Graham's ire were comments at a CNN town hall this week, when Buttigieg was asked by a woman who described herself as a bisexual Christian, how he will "challenge the right's moral monopoly on Christianity to unite conservative, moderate and liberal Christians alike..."

His full answer is worth reading, but the essence is that he acknowledged it "can be challenging to be a person of faith who's also part of the LGBTQ community" while also saying his understanding of faith is far different than Pence's or Graham's:
"Part of where I'm coming from is a faith tradition that counsels me to be as humble as possible, that counsels me to look after those who need defending.

And frankly, it couldn't be more radically different than what I see certainly in this White House, where there's a lot of chest-thumping and self-aggrandizing, not to mention abusive behavior, but also a political agenda that seems to always be revolving around the idea that somehow it's too easy for poor people in this country. It's just so different than what I get when I read scripture.
And I get that one of the things about scripture is different people see different things in it. But at the very least, we should be able to establish that God does not have a political party."

There is still a strong religious divide in the country on the subject of gay rights. In a 2017 Pew survey, there was strong support (62%) among all Americans for same-sex marriage like the one a Supreme Court decision allows Buttigieg to enjoy. Just 32% of Americans oppose it.
More than two-thirds of Americans not affiliated with a religion (85%) support it, along with Catholics (67%) and white mainline Protestants (68%). But support was less than 50% among other groups Pew broke out, including black Protestants (44% support) and white evangelical Protestants (35%).

That divide carried over to political groups. Just 40% of Republicans supported same-sex marriage in the survey, compared to 73% of Democrats and 60% of Independents.
There are other polls, such as this one from Pew, that document how Republicans are more likely to believe in God than Democrats, that they're more likely to go to church, and that religion plays a larger role in the lives of more Republicans than Democrats.

Which is not to say that Democrats don't rely on religious voters. But they tend to focus on black churches. Trump, however, is equally or more reliant on white evangelicals to help him win re-election. Pence is not the only evangelical Christian working for the President; his press secretary Sarah Sanders said God wants Trump to be in office.

It's not at all clear that Buttigieg would be able to win over more churchgoers than other candidates. Hillary Clinton, a churchgoing Methodist, spoke less often than him about her own faith, but she did talk about it. She lost in 2016, however, among people who go to church monthly or more (Clinton got 43% to Trump's 53%), according to exit polls. She won 54% - 39% among people who go less than that.

The country is changing, however.
In 2016, fewer than half of voters (49%) said they went to church monthly or more. In 2012, 55% of voters in exit polls said they went to church monthly or more. In 2008, it was 54%. In 2004, it was 56%.

That trend of less church attendance by voters is mirrored in a 2018 Gallup survey of Americans at large that found even fewer -- 43% -- attend church monthly or more. It was 58% when Gallup asked the question in 1992.




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