Showing posts with label USA. Show all posts
Showing posts with label USA. Show all posts

September 26, 2018

Britain's Outperforms and is Cheaper than US on HIV Drugs-- Why Is That?




Britain’s National Health Service far outperforms America’s health care system — for far less money — at keeping H.I.V. patients healthy.

By Tina Rosenberg
Ms. Rosenberg is a co-founder of the Solutions Journalism Network, which supports rigorous reporting about responses to social problems.  

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images  Last week, the High Court of England and Wales announced a momentous decision: It invalidated the pharmaceutical company Gilead’s patent on Truvada, opening the way to generic competition.

Truvada, a combination of two drugs, is one of the world’s most-used H.I.V. medicines. For treating H.I.V., it’s used along with a third drug. But many H.I.V.-negative people also take Truvada daily as a preventive. That’s called pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP.
In the United States, Truvada is available only as a brand-name drug. It costs $20,000 a year.

Here’s how it will work in Britain’s National Health Service, according to Dr. Andrew Hill, a senior research fellow at Liverpool University who studies the cost of medicines. “The N.H.S. will say to a group of generic companies: ‘We need PrEP for 20,000 people. Give us your best price.’” The cost of making PrEP is $55 per year, Dr. Hill said. He believes that the generic will sell for between $100 and $200.

All over the world, more and more people are taking H.I.V. drugs. These medicines are very good at their job — keeping people healthy and noncontagious — so most patients will take them until they die of something that isn’t H.I.V. Patients are also starting earlier on antiretroviral therapy; the new recommendation is to start immediately upon diagnosis. And now with PrEP, a potentially enormous new group of patients has arisen: H.I.V.-negative people who are at risk for catching the virus. 

ion for the same amount or less money each year. England’s region of the health service spends about half a billion dollars per year on H.I.V. drugs. There are no increases for inflation, and lots of pressures for further cuts.

It’s lucky, then, that Truvada will have generic competition. It should allow the health service to greatly lower costs and offer PrEP to anyone who needs it.
The health service does an admirable job with H.I.V. Around the world, countries measure the percentage of people living with H.I.V. who have no virus detectable in their blood. In the United States, only 49 percent have achieved this. In Britain, the number is 78 percent.

While the National Health Service has a lot of problems, it has some huge advantages over the American system that allow it to provide high-quality H.I.V. care in a cost-efficient manner.

So it’s worth looking at what the British health service does right, because some of those strategies could work in America, even though the two systems are structured very differently.  

About the American health care system’s indifference to cost. There’s virtually no one in the system with the incentive, responsibility or power to lower the astronomical cost of H.I.V. drugs. Panels that establish guidelines recommend, and doctors tend to use, the newest drugs, even if they offer little benefit over existing ones. Patients are content because manufacturers help them with co-pays for expensive drugs. Generics are almost never used.

This year, the generic company Mylan introduced some lower-cost medicines. They are still not cheap; Mylan’s equivalent of Truvada costs $12,000 a year. Still, the creation of these new drugs has inspired a few experimental attempts to substitute them for equivalents that are even more expensive.

Even when brand-name drugs have no generic equivalents, the medicines in the British system cost a small fraction of what they cost in America. Most brand-name triple therapies cost about $6,500, said Dr. Laura Waters, an H.I.V. physician who is a member of the health service’s H.I.V. Clinical Reference Group, which sets policy. She said that a combination pill that includes some generics would cost between $2,600 and $4,000. Full generics usually cost 70 to 80 percent less than comparable brand names. One completely generic H.I.V. regimen costs $400 per year.

The National Health Service has long relied on generics to treat most diseases. But that wasn’t the case with H.I.V. Once effective drugs were developed, the field moved so fast that by the time a drug went off patent, it was no longer commonly prescribed.

But that’s not true anymore.
The first H.I.V. therapies, in 1995, were lifesaving — and toxic, with horrible side effects. Some of them required patients to take 20 pills a day.

Now patients around the world take one or two pills a day. All the regimens do well at controlling the virus. They all have some side effects for some people, but patients can switch to find a regimen they can tolerate well. What used to be a big leap forward with each new drug is now a tiny step — or an advance for only a subset of patients. So older drugs are still in use. Truvada is one example.

Three years ago, the National Health Service’s push for generics started to cover H.I.V. drugs. Dr. Waters estimated that at the time, fewer than 5 percent of H.I.V. patients were taking a generic. Now, she said, the number is more like 30 percent. 

August 25, 2018

US Senator John Sidney MacCain III Died Today




John McCain in a Hanoii POW Camp after being shot down and Donald Trump who has criticized  this man up to his death and whom you wont see at his funeral (as McCain instructions) is the opposite of everything McCaine was commencing with morals.




John Sidney McCain III was born on August 29, 1936, at Coco Solo Naval Air Station in the Panama Canal Zone, the second of three children born to naval officer John S. McCain Jr. and his wife, Roberta. At the time of his birth, the McCain family was stationed in the Panama Canal Zone, under American control.
Both McCain’s father and paternal grandfather, John Sidney McCain, Sr., were four-star admirals and his father rose to command all the U.S. naval forces in the Pacific.
McCain spent his childhood and adolescent years moving between naval bases in America and abroad. He attended Episcopal high School, a private preparatory boarding school in Alexandria, Virginia, graduating in 1954.

 This rare photo shows a U.S. airman being captured by Vietnamese forces in Truc Bach Lake.  This, of course, was at the height of the Vietnam War – and the photo was taken in Hanoi in 1967. The airman is none other than John McCain, who would later become Senator of Arizona and a Presidential hopeful. Senator McCain is also one of very few senators that have tackled the corruption in boxing and other sports


Following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, McCain graduated (fifth from the bottom of his class) from the Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1958. He also graduated from flight school in 1960.
With the outbreak of the Vietnam War, McCain volunteered for combat duty and began flying carrier-based attack planes on low-altitude bombing runs against the North Vietnamese. He escaped serious injury on July 29, 1967, when his A-4 Skyhawk plane was accidentally shot by a missile on board the USS Forestal, causing explosions and fires that killed 134.
On October 26, 1967, during his 23rd air mission, McCain’s plane was shot down during a bombing run over the North Vietnamese capital of Hanoi. He broke both arms and one leg during the ensuing crash. McCain was moved to Hoa Loa prison, nicknamed the “Hanoi Hilton,” on December 9, 1969.
His captors soon learned he was the son of a high-ranking officer in the U.S. Navy and repeatedly offered him early release, but McCain refused, not wanting to violate the military code of conduct and knowing that the North Vietnamese would use his release as a powerful piece of propaganda.
McCain eventually spent five and a half years in various prison camps, three and a half of those in solitary confinement, and was repeatedly beaten and tortured before he was finally released, along with other American POWs, on March 14, 1973, less than two months after the Vietnam cease fire went into effect. McCain earned the Silver Star, Bronze Star, Purple Heart and Distinguished Flying Cross.
Though McCain had lost most of his physical strength and flexibility, he was determined to continue serving as a naval aviator. After a painful nine months of rehabilitation, he returned to flying duty, but it soon became clear that his injuries had permanently impaired his ability to advance in the Navy.
Image result for Mccain's life



His introduction to politics came in 1976, when he was assigned as the Navy’s liaison to the U.S. Senate. In 1981, after marrying his second wife, Cindy Hensley, McCain retired from the Navy, and moved to Phoenix, Arizona. While working in public relations for his father-in-law’s beer distribution business, he began establishing connections in politics.
McCain was first elected to political office on November 2, 1982, easily winning a seat in the House of Representatives after his well-known war record helped overcome doubts about his “carpetbagger” status. He was re-elected in 1984.
Having adapted well to the largely conservative politics of his home state, McCain was a loyal supporter of the Reagan administration and numbered among a group of young “new Right.”
In 1986, after the retirement of the longtime Arizona senator and prominent Republican Barry Goldwater, McCain won election to the U.S. Senate. Both in the House and the Senate, McCain earned a reputation as a conservative politician who nonetheless was not afraid to question the ruling Republican orthodoxy. In 1983, for example, he called for the withdrawal of U.S. Marines from Lebanon, and he also publicly criticized the administration’s handling of the Iran-Contra affair.
           Image result for Mccain's life

McCain weathered the scandal and won re-election to the Senate three times, each time with a solid majority. His reputation as a maverick politician with firm beliefs and a quick temper only increased, and many were impressed with his willingness to be extremely open with the public and the press. He has worked diligently in support of increased tobacco legislation and especially the reform of the campaign finance system, professing some more liberal views and generally proving to be more complex than merely a straight-ahead conservative.
In 1999, McCain published Faith of My Fathers, the story of his family’s military history and his own experiences as a POW. He also emerged as a solid challenger to the frontrunner, Governor George W. Bush of Texas, for the Republican presidential nomination in 2000. Many people from both political parties found his straight talk refreshing. In the New Hampshire primary, McCain won by a surprisingly wide margin, largely bolstered by independent voters and cross-over Democrats.
After a roller-coaster ride during the primaries–Bush won South Carolina, while McCain captured Michigan and Arizona–Bush emerged triumphant on “Super Tuesday” in early March 2000, winning New York and California, among a number of others. Though McCain won in most of the New England states, his large electoral deficit forced him to “suspend” his campaign indefinitely. On May 9, after holding out for two months, McCain formally endorsed Bush.
In August 2000, McCain was diagnosed with skin cancer lesions on his face and arm, which doctors determined were unrelated to a similar lesion which he had removed in 1993. He subsequently underwent surgery, during which all the cancerous tissue was successfully removed. McCain also underwent routine prostate surgery for an enlarged prostate in August of 2001.
McCain was back in the headlines in the spring of 2001, when the Senate debated and eventually passed, by a vote of 59-41, a broad overhaul of the campaign finance system. The bill was the fruit of McCain’s six-year effort, with Democratic Senator Russell D. Feingold of Wisconsin to reform the system. Central to the McCain-Feingold bill was a controversial ban on the unrestricted contributions to political parties known as “soft money.” The new law was narrowly upheld by the Supreme Court in 2003.
Image result for Mccain's life

McCain supported the Iraq War, but criticized The Pentagon several times, especially about low troop strength. At one point, McCain declared he had “no confidence” in the leadership of Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld. McCain supported the 2007 surge of more than 20,000 troops, which supporters say has increased security in Iraq.
McCain also publicly supported President Bush’s bid for re-election, even though he differed with Bush on several issues including torture, pork barrel spending, illegal immigration, a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage and global warming. He also defended the Vietnam War record of Bush’s opponent, Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts, which came under attack during the campaign.
With Bush limited to two terms, McCain officially entered the 2008 presidential race on April 25, 2007, during an announcement in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. McCain and running mate Sarah Palin were defeated by Democrat Barack Obama in the November 2008 election.
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McCain married Carol Shepp, a model originally from Philadelphia, on July 3, 1965. He adopted her two young children from a previous marriage (Doug and Andy Shepp) and they had a daughter (Sydney, b. 1966). The couple divorced in April 1980.
McCain met Cindy Lou Hensley, a teacher from Phoenix and daughter of a prosperous Arizona beer distributor, while she was on vacation in 1979 with her parents in Hawaii. He was still married at the time, but separated from his first wife. John and Cindy McCain were married May 17, 1980 in Phoenix. They have four children: Meghan (b. 1984), John IV (known as Jack, b. 1986), James (known as Jimmy, b. 1988), and Bridget (b. 1991 in Bangladesh, adopted by the McCains in 1993).
Biography courtesy of BIO.com
(No Pics)

July 10, 2018

US Threatened Ecuador Over Breast Feeding, Think Formula and US Commerce

shutterstock 1128573119

US Threatened Ecuador Over Breastfeeding

American delegates to the U.N.-affiliated World Health Assembly reportedly strong-armed Ecuador and other nations to stop them from introducing a resolution endorsing breastfeeding. The South American country had intended to submit a document urging all nations to “protect, support and promote” nursing mothers, but withdrew it after Trump administration representatives threatened to withdraw military aid and impose trade restrictions, The New York Times reported. The U.S. ultimately dropped its opposition — seen as support for the $70 billion baby food industry — once the resolution was introduced by Russia.
SOURCES:
NYTVOX

June 14, 2018

"Unconditional" Love and The Beginning of The US Being the Submissive Partner to China


Some people refuse to learn Spanish which is a language closely associated
  with this nation
since the inception.
 Would they learn Mandarin πŸ¦Š instead?

 Kim Jong Un, A master negotiator on his first try, pushes his
 submissive partner into the lair.
 







Where will the Singapore summit lead the US?
Getty

  • President Donald Trump on Tuesday said the US would suspend military exercises with South Korea during peace talks with North Korea.
  • In doing so, he may have set the US up to lose its status as the world's dominant power.
  • Without drills, the US forces in South Korea will wither, and if peace talks continue, the very rationale for them will erode as well.
  • If the US pulls out of South Korea, as Trump wants to, it will accelerate China's dominance in Asia and likely around the world president Donald Trump's joint statement with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Tuesday provided few specifics and no binding commitments, but it most likely set in motion a series of events that could unseat the US as the dominant world power. 
    Trump, going above and beyond the statement on paper, promised to halt joint military exercises with South Korea. For the US, its 30,000 or so troops in South Korea represent a foothold on the Asian mainland and a major check on China's growing global ambitions. 
    South Korea and the US forces themselves were apparently shocked by the news, but both North Korea and China seized on this concession. 
    Kim, according to North Korean media, said "to achieve peace and stability of the Korean Peninsula and realize its denuclearization," North Korea and the US "should commit themselves to refraining from antagonizing with each other." 
  • Trump and Kim Jong Un wrote Tuesday of a new future for the world, but that new future may be one ruled from Beijing, not Washington. 
  • To China, the agreement sounded like one it had been pushing all along, a "suspension for suspension," in which the US stops military drills with South Korea in exchange for North Korea halting its missile and nuclear tests. 
The US had long resisted calls from North Korea and China for dual suspension, saying the bilateral, planned, and transparent military exercises were legal while North Korea's nuclear program was not. 
If North Korea's illegal nuclear program forced the US military to stop training with its ally, then it sends a powerful message to leaders everywhere: The US can be blackmailed with nukes. 

The US loose tooth in Asia 


US soldiers South Korea
US troops at the Osan Air Base in 2016 in Pyeongtaek, South Korea.
Jeon Heon-Kyun-Pool/Getty Images

Without military drills, the massive installation of troops will wither. Already, North Korea has criticized the US and South Korea's military exercises, saying they're not helpful for peace talks.  Trump, seemingly unprompted, has long wanted to withdraw the US from South Korea, and now he may have found a reason. 
If the US and North Korea — or North Korea and South Korea — normalize relations, that undercuts the stated rationale for having US forces on the peninsula. 
Why should the US station 30,000 troops in Korea if Korea is at peace? One reason could be to rein in China. 
China is set to overtake the US as the world's dominant power within the coming decades. As China embraces some capitalism and uses strong-arm tactics to become a technological power while modernizing the world's biggest armed forces, it falls on the US to reassure its allies in Asia and around the world that international order will stand up to Chinese hegemony. The US military in Asia remains vital to that task
China's rise has been a long time coming. The US military, even with its massive forces in Japan and Korea, already strains to contain it. But losing the foothold in South Korea could be the straw that breaks the camel's back.

"The US-DPRK summit — the first in history — was an epochal event of great significance in overcoming decades of tensions and hostilities between the two countries and for the opening up of a new future," Trump and Kim's joint statement said. 
But the new epoch envisioned here by Trump and Kim may be one in which the US loses its grip on Asia, and then the world and the new future will most likely be ruled from Beijing, not Washington.


October 12, 2017

The Only Dictator in NATO Turkey's Erdogan Creates Incident By Expulsing US Ambassador




Erdogan, better known as the Thug of Europe with some saying that Turkey should have never been allowed to join Europe, NATO or any agreement with the West because of their past behavior including a massacre.

One could judge the man and show he does not have a single hair of diplomacy in him when his thugs beat American demonstrators a few months ago. He doesn't allow demonstrations in Turkey so He must've thought neither do the US. Not much intelligence there and less intelligence in attacking websites trying to disrupt the traffic to the web. Again he doesn't know those particular attacks does not affect all sites and particularly sites that don't sell anything. I know about his attacks because he has been attacking this site for months after we called him a thug immediately after the beating of American demonstrators.
He does no damage to us and our intelligence services get to see their MO on web attacks. We feel honored when people no matter who they are, showing everyone what they were called was fair because that's what they are.
adamoxie*blog International
                                                                               πŸ¦Š

Turkey no longer recognizes the US ambassador to Ankara, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Tuesday, toughening his rhetoric amid a worsening row with the United States, sparked by the arrest of a US consulate employee. 
“We do not recognize him as the representative of the United States of America in Turkey, I say this quite openly,” Erdogan said about John Bass during a news conference while on a trip to Serbia.

“We did not start this problem,” Erdogan said, accusing the US of being responsible for the sharp deterioration in relations.
It was an escalation from the day before when the Turkish leader had only expressed sadness over the row.

We do not recognize him as the representative of the United States of America in Turkey, I say this quite openly TURKISH PRESIDENT RECEP TAYYIP  ERDOGAN ON US AMBASSADOR JOHN BASS.    (???)




On Sunday, the US stopped offering non-immigrant visa services in Turkey, citing security concerns. Hours later, Turkish missions in the US took a similar step and also froze US passport holders out of an electronic visa system.
US State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said the US decision was coordinated with the White House.

The Turkish president said that if the suspension of visa services was decided at the top levels in Washington, then Ankara has nothing more to discuss with the US
Nauert also said the State Department is disappointed by the arrest last week of a Turkish employee of the US consulate in Istanbul.

Allowing the employee access to a lawyer “would be a good start to reduce tension,” Nauert said.

The employee is the second US staff member arrested this year, while a third employee is being sought for questioning while his family members are being held in custody.

Erdogan implied “agents” had infiltrated the US consulate in Istanbul, saying: “All this shows us that something is going on in the consulate in Istanbul.”
The president’s words appeared to undercut earlier efforts by Prime Minister Binali Yildirim to work towards a resolution.

“I hope that this tension will end soon,” Yildirim told members of the ruling Islamic-conservative Justice and Development Party (AKP), noting that citizens of both countries were being disadvantaged by the visa freeze.

“We started a legal process against some people who work at the American missions,” said the prime minister. “So what?”

This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as Erdogan refuses to recognize US envoy  



April 18, 2017

Homelessness in the USA Interactive by State Graph




 Homeless man sleep on bench on White Hall Station of No 1 line



March 3, 2017

EU Calls for Americans to Apply for Visas When Traveling to Europe








The European Parliament called on the EU executive on Thursday to force Americans to apply for visas before visiting Europe this summer, stepping up pressure to resolve a long-running transatlantic dispute on the issue.

The European Commission stressed it was pursuing a diplomatic resolution to the row, leaving it unlikely that it would act on the vote by lawmakers setting a May deadline to impose visas - a move that could hurt Europe's tourism sector.

Washington refuses to grant visa-free access to people from four east European states and Cyprus, while those from the other 23 member states can enter using the U.S. visa waiver program. EU rules call for equal treatment for all Union citizens.

Commission officials noted a planned EU-U.S. ministerial meeting on June 15 to try and resolve the issue, which has been running since 2014. The EU executive already allowed a deadline for a solution to pass nearly a year ago, without taking action.

"We will report on further progress made before the end of June and continue to work closely with both the European Parliament and the Council," a Commission spokeswoman said, referring to the council which groups the governments of the 28 EU member states.

A Commission official said contacts are ongoing with the U.S. administration "to push for full visa reciprocity," but fell short of saying that immediate action would be taken.

Former Communist countries Poland, Croatia, Bulgaria and Romania, as well as the Mediterranean island of Cyprus, have been calling on Brussels to end U.S. discrimination against their citizens.

But the economic cost of imposing visa restrictions on the millions of American tourists and business travelers who visit Europe each year is a major disincentive.

Most EU countries are part of the Schengen zone that allows people to travel freely inside Europe without passport checks.  

The Parliament, by a show of hands, urged the Commission to adopt restrictive measures against U.S. citizens "within two months". Lawmakers have little immediate power to ensure that the executive complies with such demands.

Canada also imposes visa requirements on Bulgarian and Romanian citizens, but it has announced that they will be lifted in December.


(by Francesco Guarascio 

PanARMENIAN.Net - European Union member countries have backed a proposal to allow Ukrainian citizens into the bloc for short stays without visas, The Republic reports.
Ambassadors of EU member states on Thursday, March 2 endorsed an agreement reached by negotiators earlier this week. It will allow Ukrainians who have biometric passports to enter the EU for up to 90 days within any 180-day period.
The visa waiver will apply to all members of the 28-nation EU except Britain and Ireland. The agreement also won't give Ukrainians the right to work in the EU.
The European Parliament must still sign off on the agreement.

February 18, 2017

Three Different FBI Investigations into Russia’s Election Hacking






The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation is pursuing at least three separate probes relating to alleged Russian hacking of the U.S. presidential elections, according to five current and former government officials with direct knowledge of the situation.

While the fact that the FBI is investigating had been reported previously by the New York Times and other media, these officials shed new light on both the precise number of inquires and their focus.

The FBI's Pittsburgh field office, which runs many cyber security investigations, is trying to identify the people behind breaches of the Democratic National Committee's computer systems, the officials said. Those breaches, in 2015 and the first half of 2016, exposed the internal communications of party officials as the Democratic nominating convention got underway and helped undermine support for Hillary Clinton.

The Pittsburgh case has progressed furthest, but Justice Department officials in Washington believe there is not enough clear evidence yet for an indictment, two of the sources said.

Meanwhile the bureau’s San Francisco office is trying to identify the people who called themselves “Guccifer 2” and posted emails stolen from Clinton campaign manager John Podesta’s account, the sources said. Those emails contained details about fundraising by the Clinton Foundation and other topics.

Beyond the two FBI field offices, FBI counterintelligence agents based in Washington are pursuing leads from informants and foreign communications intercepts, two of the people said.

This counterintelligence inquiry includes but is not limited to examination of financial transactions by Russian individuals and companies who are believed to have links to Trump associates. The transactions under scrutiny involve investments by Russians in overseas entities that appear to have been undertaken through middlemen and front companies, two people briefed on the probe said.

Reuters could not confirm which entities and individuals were under scrutiny.

Scott Smith, the FBI's new assistant director for cyber crime, declined to comment this week on which FBI offices were doing what or how far they had progressed.

The White House had no comment on Friday on the Russian hacking investigations. A spokesman pointed to a comment Trump made during the campaign, in which he said: “As far as hacking, I think it was Russia, but I think we also get hacked by other countries and other people."

During a news conference Thursday, President Donald Trump said he had no business connections to Russia.

The people who spoke to Reuters also corroborated a Tuesday New York Times report that Americans with ties to Trump or his campaign had repeated contacts with current and former Russian intelligence officers before the November election. Those alleged contacts are among the topics of the FBI counterintelligence investigation.

(Reporting by Joseph Menn in San Francisco. Additional reporting by Dustin Volz in San Francisco and Mark Hosenball, John Walcott and Steve Holland in Washington; Editing by Jonathan Weber and Tomasz Janowski)

February 13, 2017

Gallop Says Americans See US Standing at Its Worst in a Decade



  • 42% of Americans believe the world views the U.S. favorably
  • 29% say world leaders respect Trump; 67% said same of Obama in 2009
  • Satisfaction with U.S. on the world stage is near record low
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Americans believe the world at large sees the U.S. more unfavorably (57%) than favorably (42%), their worst assessment of the country's image in 10 years. A year ago, Americans' perceptions were more positive than negative.
Graph 1
These results are from a Gallup survey conducted Feb. 1-5, about two weeks into Donald Trump's presidency. The 42% favorable rating is one of the lowest since Gallup began asking this question in 2000 and may be attributable to the election of Trump, whose sometimes controversial statements and actions have rankled several world leaders. However, Americans' perceptions of the image of the U.S. abroad were marginally worse in 2007, when 40% thought the world viewed the nation favorably. At the time, the U.S. was embroiled in wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and President George W. Bush was highly unpopular.
The high-water mark for Americans believing the U.S. is viewed favorably was 79% in 2002, in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the U.S.
Much of this year's drop in favorable perceptions of how the world views the U.S. is fueled by a precipitous slide among Democrats now that a Republican president is in office. Currently, 31% of Democrats think the world views the U.S. at least somewhat favorably, down from 68% last year. By contrast, Republicans' views have improved this year, to 54% from 39%, but not enough to offset the decline among Democrats.
Few Americans Believe Leaders Worldwide Respect Trump
Fewer than three in 10 Americans (29%) say leaders of other countries have respect for the new president, with 67% saying world leaders do not have much respect for him. When Barack Obama took office in 2009, the results were nearly opposite: 67% of Americans then believed global leaders respected the president, while 20% said leaders did not. At the time of the prior presidential transition in 2001, more Americans also believed George W. Bush was respected than believed he was not.
20170210_WorldPosition_chart
The 29% now believing that world leaders respect the president also represents a sharp drop from one year ago, in the last year of Obama's presidency. At that time, 45% said they believed the president was respected.
One reason for the drop is that fewer Republicans today think Trump is respected (60%) than Democrats in 2016 thought Obama was respected (79%).
Satisfaction With World Position Little Changed From 2016
Despite Americans' depressed perceptions of how world leaders view their new president, Americans' satisfaction with the country's position in the world hasn't changed much from last year -- 32% say they are satisfied with the position of the U.S. worldwide, down slightly from 36% in 2016.
Graph 3
The current reading continues a recent trend of relatively low satisfaction with the nation's global status, something that has persisted since the Iraq War troop surge in 2007.
While the Iraq War may have been a factor a decade ago, satisfaction has remained low even as U.S. involvement has wound down. The rise of the Islamic State and terrorism in general may be contributing to Americans' continued low level of satisfaction with their country's position in the world. Americans' widespread dissatisfaction with the way things are going in the U.S. could also affect their level of satisfaction with the nation's world standing.
Bottom Line
At the beginning of Trump's presidency, Americans' perceptions of how the world views the U.S. and its new president are significantly worse than they were a year ago -- and are on the low end for the past decade. This has been fueled by a sharp decline among Democrats who hold highly negative views of Trump's character and opening job performance.
But even a year ago, when Americans thought the world viewed the U.S. and Obama positively, Americans were still largely unsatisfied with the nation's global standing. This trend has been steadily negative for the past decade. Americans may not put much weight on how the rest of the world perceives the president in assessing whether they are satisfied with the United States' standing in the world. In addition to concerns about international matters such as Syria and terrorism, those views may be influenced by how they think things are going in the U.S., their low confidence in public institutions and their low trust in government. Such factors appear to have a marked effect on how Americans feel when they look beyond their borders.

by Art Swift
Historical data are available in Gallup Analytics.
SURVEY METHODS
Results for this Gallup poll are based on telephone interviews conducted Feb. 1-5, 2017, with a random sample of 1,035 adults, aged 18 and older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. For results based on the total sample of national adults, the margin of sampling error is ±4 percentage points at the 95% confidence level. All reported margins of sampling error include computed design effects for weighting.
Each sample of national adults includes a minimum quota of 70% cellphone respondents and 30% landline respondents, with additional minimum quotas by time zone within region. Landline and cellular telephone numbers are selected using random-digit-dial methods.

February 10, 2017

In Iran Thousands March Against USA but Others Are Thankful


Its very interesting that in Iran an enemy of the US and being  a control society, still you find people that are listening not just to Washington nowadays but to Americans and to what americans are saying about immigration and racism. There are some crazy anti US *Mulas in Iran but so in the US. 

Hundreds of thousands of Iranians heeded the call of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei to demonstrate Friday against U.S. "threats" — but some had words of support for Americans.

There was a notable absence of burning U.S. flags during the march along Revolutionary Road that leads to Tehran's Azadi (Freedom) Square - particularly given the fact that Friday marked the 38th anniversary of the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

At similar rallies in years past, it would be typical to see a U.S. flag burning every 10-15 yards, but none were seen Friday. And only one effigy of President Donald Trump was witnessed, as opposed to dozens of former President Barack Obama at the same event last year.

Despite Trump threatening Iran on Twitter last week that it was "on notice," and calls by Khamenei and President Hassan Rouhani to rally, a social media movement to tone down the protests appeared to have had some impact in cosmopolitan Tehran. In addition, very few placards handed out by official state organizers mentioned Trump or had anti-American slogans.

Iranians used the hashtag #LoveBeyondFlags to urge an end to the U.S. flag-burning typically seen at the annual anniversary rally.

During the rally in Tehran, some people carried placards in support of the U.S. and thanked ordinary Americans for opposing Trump’s executive order banning entry to the United States to travelers from seven mainly Muslim countries, including Iran.

 

Image: Iranians mark the 38th anniversary of the 1979 Islamic revolution in Tehran, Friday.


Iranians mark the 38th anniversary of the 1979 Islamic revolution in Tehran, Friday. Abedin Taherkenareh / EPA
*In the smapnish language a *mula is a jack ass or donkey.

October 5, 2016

International Observers Getting Ready to Watch US Elections Closely







Amid charges from Donald Trump that the U.S. presidential election could be "rigged" and concerns of rights activists that black voters may face undue obstacles, the head of an international observer team pledged a full review ranging from voting machines to racial bias as it began work on Tuesday.
The team from the 57-nation Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) that will monitor the Nov. 8 presidential and Congressional elections is set to be the biggest the organization has sent to the United States, tasked with checking the vote meets international standards.
Republican candidate Trump's apparent suggestion that the vote might not be free and fair has drawn an angry response from his opponents, who say it is baseless.
Democrat Hillary Clinton has led Trump in national opinion polls in recent months. On Tuesday, an average of polls aggregated by RealClearPolitics website showed her with 48.1 percent of support compared to Trump’s 44.3 percent.

Civil rights advocates have also said voters are more likely to face racial bias at this election than they have in 50 years, because of voting laws that several states passed after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down part of the landmark anti-discrimination 1965 Voting Rights Act three years ago.
"We do have concerns about voter registration, voter identification and also electronic voting," the head of the OSCE mission, British lawyer and diplomat Audrey Glover said in a telephone interview, adding that the mission is impartial.
"We always let the facts speak for themselves, so let's see what happens," she said. Allegations such as Trump's, however, were for the U.S. authorities to follow up on while the OSCE observed, she added. "We're not policemen."
The Shelby County v Holder Supreme Court ruling in 2013 struck down a part of the Voting Rights Act that was used to determine which areas with a history of discrimination had to obtain special permission before changing their voting laws.
That has raised concerns among rights groups that laws on issues like voter identification have since been changed to make it more difficult for poor and minority voters to take part.
 The OSCE, which comprises much of Europe, Central Asia and North America, has also suggested that all electronic voting machines be required by law to leave a verifiable paper trail, though many states do not provide one.

Glover said her team would seek to clarify where it legally can and cannot go, adding that states' and counties' stance on international observers was often not clear. Texas also threatened OSCE observers with prosecution four years ago, which the organization called "unacceptable" at the time.
Glover, however, struck a conciliatory tone.
"If the law says international observers are not allowed, then obviously we won't try and go. We're not going to try and make any sort of a scene," she told Reuters.
But the biggest hindrance might be self-inflicted. The OSCE had hoped to deploy 100 so-called long-term observers in the coming week, but OSCE states - including Germany, France, Spain, Romania, Finland, Bosnia - have only provided 26.
Up to 400 short-term observers will begin work close to Election Day.
"We'll do what we can with what we've got," Glover said. “We will try and make a silk purse out of a pig's ear and we will try and cover the whole of the United States, or to the extent that is feasible."

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