Showing posts with label Homophobia in Schools. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Homophobia in Schools. Show all posts

March 12, 2020

BYU's Made U-turn On Gay Students Which Now Cannot Date On Campus Only Straight Ones



To the parents and schoolboard:
*How does gay dating in school offend you, didn't you date?-You have at least one kid! Should they date straight students and make gay straight marriages until the gay one comes out and have to leave and just visit the kids or sue for for custody?
*Why those parents feel their straight kids don't date and what good does it do their kids or the school to treat all students equally and with dignity(Is that christian enough?)
*Would it make you feel better if your kids become as homophobic as you?
* Did god call you to judge---I think not, if I remember the bible correctly and I do
                                       

We just want to stop being toyed with.



(See Savannah Skyler's other Tweets)


Students at Brigham Young University say they have "whiplash" after the school confirmed a ban on same-sex relationships, just two weeks after it changed its code of conduct to appear to permit them.

"Same-sex romantic behavior cannot lead to eternal marriage, and is therefore not compatible with the principles of the Honor Code," Elder Paul V. Johnson, commissioner of the Church Educational System, which oversees BYU, wrote in a statement to university students Wednesday.

The move appeared to be a policy U-turn after the private university in Provo, Utah — owned by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, widely known as the Mormon Church — updated its strict and mandatory code of conduct for students on Feb. 19 to remove a clause prohibiting "all forms of physical intimacy that give expression to homosexual feelings." 

Supreme Court adoption case could have broad nondiscrimination impact
Last month's update had been welcomed by the university's LGBTQ students, who saw it as an indication that BYU had further eased its restrictions on same-sex sexual behavior. While students have been allowed to openly identify as gay since 2007, they have long been banned from being in same-sex relationships.

Current and former BYU students told NBC News that they had spoken to university administrators after the code was updated and confirmed that as long as gay couples also followed the rule of chastity and didn't have sex outside a heterosexual marriage, they could openly date and show affection.

But in a Q&A with the director of the Honor Code Office, Kevin Utt, which was published Wednesday on the school's website, Utt emphasized that "any same-sex romantic behavior is a violation of the principles of the Honor Code" and was still prohibited. 

Students turned out late last week to protest the apparent return to the status quo, with two on-campus gatherings on Wednesday and Thursday in Provo and a larger rally Friday in front of the church's headquarters in Salt Lake City, where BYU students and community allies chanted "Let all students date!" and sang Mormon hymns. 

"It was whiplash — total, complete traumatic whiplash," Tiauna Lomax, 21, a junior who identifies as bisexual, said of Utt's interview.

Lomax said the change to the Honor Code last month had given her the courage to come out to her parents. She hadn't been comfortable dating women before that, because it was against school rules and meant risking being suspended or even expelled.

"I felt like I had an institution that supported me. ... The place I called home supported me, so I could come out to my parents," Lomax told NBC News.

She said the subsequent "clarification" to the rules two weeks later felt like a personal rejection.

"I sobbed for hours," she said. "It was awful to not feel wanted and betrayed like that."

Lomax hasn't ruled out transferring. She said that it's an option open to her financially but that she fears for other students who don't have the resources. The OUT Foundation, an organization for LGBTQ BYU alumni, is offering advice and financial support for students wanting to transfer. The group's fundraiser, which launched Wednesday, had raised over $34,000 by Monday afternoon. 
Summer Lee-Corry, 21, transferred from BYU to Utah Valley University last year. She identifies as queer and said BYU "was not a healthy place" for her. Lee-Corry said fear of being reported to the Honor Code Office and punished led her to avoid even platonic physical contact with women in public and in front of her roommates.

"I've had several friends die by suicide. If I had stayed at BYU, I would have been one of those statistics," she said.

Lee-Corry still attends church to serve as a role model for other young gay Mormons. She said BYU's attitude is at odds with her faith.

"They often call it 'the Lord's University' within the LDS Church," Lee-Corry said. "What I learned within the Christian religion was that Jesus sat with people who nobody else would sit with. How can we call BYU 'the Lord's University' when I know that Jesus would have been part of our protest, loving and accepting the queer students there?" 

In an email Monday, Carrie P. Jenkins, a BYU spokesperson, said, "The Honor Code was changed to create a single standard for all Church educational institutions that is consistent with the recently released General Handbook of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints."

Under a section titled "Same-Sex Attraction and Same-Sex Behavior," the General Handbook, which was also released Feb. 19, encourages "kindness, inclusiveness, love for others, and respect for all human beings."

The handbook allows gay men to serve in senior church roles, but it ultimately asks LGBTQ members to remain chaste, emphasizing that sex must be reserved for heterosexual marriage.

While BYU still asks students to "encourage" others to comply with the school's Honor Code, "encourage is not synonymous with 'turn someone in,'" Utt said in his Q&A on the school's website.

"We realize that emotions over the last two weeks cover the spectrum and that some have and will continue to feel isolation and pain," he said. "We encourage all members of our campus community to reach out to those who are personally affected with sensitivity, love and respect."

December 4, 2019

Teacher at Utah Public School Told The 11Yr Son of Gay Parents it Was Sinful, Gay is Wrong


When one of the students answered that he was “thankful for finally being adopted by my two dads,” the teacher retorted that “homosexuality is wrong,” one of the boy’s parents said in a video that has gotten widespread attention on social media. The teacher then told the student that it was sinful for two men to live together, the father said.
The substitute teacher was fired soon after, according to the staffing company that had placed the woman at the school, Deerfield Elementary in Cedar Hills, Utah.
Image result for substitute teacher at a Utah public school
 Van Amstel, an Amsterdam-born choreographer, former dance champion
                                       





 
 

A substitute teacher at a Utah public school asked students in a fifth-grade class what they were thankful for before they left for Thanksgiving break.

When one of the students answered that he was “thankful for finally being adopted by my two dads,” the teacher retorted that “homosexuality is wrong,” one of the boy’s parents said in a video that has gotten widespread attention on social media. The teacher then told the student that it was sinful for two men to live together, the father said. 

The substitute teacher has fired soon after, according to the staffing company that had placed the woman at the school, Deerfield Elementary in Cedar Hills, Utah. 

The father, Louis van Amstel, who is known for his role on “Dancing With the Stars,” wrote on Twitter and Facebook that his son, Daniel, 11, had been bullied by the teacher.

“It shouldn’t matter if you’re gay, straight, bisexual, black and white,” van Amstel said in an interview Sunday. “If you’re adopting a child and if that child goes to a public school, that teacher should not share her opinion about what she thinks we do in our private life.”

Van Amstel, 47, credited three girls in the class with alerting the principal about the teacher’s actions and with speaking up on behalf of his son, who he said did not want the teacher to get in trouble.

“The woman, even when the principal said, ‘Well, you’re fired,’ and escorted her out the door, tried to blame Daniel for what she said,’” van Amstel said.

The episode happened Nov. 21 in the Alpine School District, which is one of the largest in Utah and serves about 80,000 students in several communities south of Salt Lake City.

The district’s spokesman, David Stephenson, said in an email that “the school took appropriate action that day based upon their investigation,” but referred questions on the substitute teacher to Kelly Services, the staffing company used by the district. The district did not identify the teacher. 

Kelly Services said in a statement Sunday that the substitute teacher was no longer employed by the company.

“We are concerned about any reports of inappropriate conduct and take these matters very seriously,” the statement said. “We conducted an investigation and made the decision to end the employee’s relationship with Kelly Services.”

The company did not respond to questions about how long the substitute teacher had been placed in the school district or the vetting process it used for school instructors.

Van Amstel said he was proud of how swiftly and decisively the school had handled the situation but was troubled about the vetting of the teacher and about how she had tried to impose her personal beliefs on a group of children.

Van Amstel, an Amsterdam-born choreographer, former dance champion and creator of the dance fitness program LaBlast, said his neighbors in Utah had rallied around his family. He said some online commenters had jumped to unfair conclusions about what he described as a politically and socially conservative state.

Image result for substitute teacher at a Utah public school
 Gay dads
              

“It doesn’t mean that all of Utah is now bad,” he said. “This is one person.”

The episode came just a few weeks after the Trump administration proposed a rule change that would roll back Obama-era discrimination protections that were based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Advocates for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender families have said that the reversal could allow foster care and adoption agencies to deny their services to LGBTQ families on faith-based grounds.

In 2017, van Amstel wed Joshua Lancaster at the Sundance Mountain Resort in Utah, posting a photo of their marriage license on Instagram. He said his spouse took his surname so they and their children would have the same one. 

The couple started the adoption process in 2018 and met Daniel for the first time in March after seeing his photograph online, van Amstel said. Daniel’s placement with his would-be parents came on Father’s Day, according to van Amstel, who said the adoption would become final this month.

“This boy since we met him feels like our son,” van Amstel said. “Right now, it feels like I made him.”



August 27, 2019

Eight Grader In Indiana Beat at Locker room Because of Him Being Gay




Image result for gay boy attacked at locker room


An eighth-grader in Indiana says he was violently beaten by a classmate because he's gay.

"I was in the locker room after the third-period gym," the victim, a student at Alexandria-Monroe High School, told WISH Channel 8. "And the guy who attacked me was standing at my locker, being creepy. He asked, 'What are you doing?' I was like, 'I'm changing.'"

The eighth-grader, who requested anonymity identified his attacker as a 10th-grader. He said the two had gym together but were not friends and rarely interacted. 

"[He] started shoving me with his shoulder," the victim told WISH. "He hit me two times in the head and then hit my face against the mirror. And then [he hit me] a couple more times to my face—and then someone pulled him off." 

He believes the older student attacked him "because of my sexuality."

Two students recorded footage of the assault, authorities confirmed. The fact that they had their phones at the ready, says the victim, suggests it was a planned attacked.

On Friday Alexandria police confirmed they were investigating the incident but "[had] not uncovered any evidence" the victim's sexual orientation played a part, according to the network. "They're trying to say it's not a hate crime," the victim's mother told WISH. "Well, what else do you call it?"

She was on school grounds for a parent-teacher conference when the attack happened, was sent a clip of the assault by a friend.

"I thought I was going to throw up," she said. "In the video, you see my son is backed up against the wall, kind of like a corner of the concrete wall by the mirror. This kid's in front of him and there are kids on either side, blocking his escape. [The 10th-grader] just squats down and starts wailing on his face and head."

The video reportedly shows the student punching her son four times. "It all happened so fast," said the eighth-grader. "The whole thing lasted under a minute."

He reportedly suffered a broken nose, bruised eye, and scratches behind his ear. "I don't really feel anything yet," he said. "I'm kind of numb."

In a statement, Alexandria Community Schools superintendent Melissa Brisco said the district "was deeply troubled by Tuesday's assault."

"We want to assure our families and community that we will continue to work hard to provide a safe, caring and supportive learning environment for all our students," she added. As of Friday night, no charges had been filed. 


 An eighth grader in Indiana says he was violently beaten by a classmate because he's gay.

"I was in the locker room after third period gym," the victim, a student at Alexandria-Monroe High School, told WISH Channel 8. "And the guy who attacked me was standing at my locker, being creepy. He asked, 'What are you doing?' I was like, 'I'm changing.'"

The eighth grader, who requested anonymity identified his attacker as a 10th-grader. He said the two had gym together but were not friends and rarely interacted.

Classmates videoed the assault, violating the school's ban on phones, and texted it to others.
GETTY IMAGES
"[He] started shoving me with his shoulder," the victim told WISH. "He hit me two times in the head and then hit my face against the mirror. And then [he hit me] a couple more times to my face—and then someone pulled him off."


He believes the older student attacked him "because of my sexuality."

Two students recorded footage of the assault, authorities confirmed. The fact that they had their phones at the ready, says the victim, suggests it was a planned attacked.

On Friday Alexandria police confirmed they were investigating the incident but "[had] not uncovered any evidence" the victim's sexual orientation played a part, according to the network. "They're trying to say it's not a hate crime," the victim's mother told WISH. "Well, what else do you call it?"

She was on school grounds for a parent-teacher conference when the attack happened, was sent a clip of the assault by a friend.

"I thought I was going to throw up," she said. "In the video, you see my son is backed up against the wall, kind of like a corner of the concrete wall by the mirror. This kid's in front of him and there are kids on either side, blocking his escape. [The 10th-grader] just squats down and starts wailing on his face and head."

The video reportedly shows the student punching her son four times. "It all happened so fast," said the eighth-grader. "The whole thing lasted under a minute."

He reportedly suffered a broken nose, bruised eye and scratches behind his ear. "I don't really feel anything yet," he said. "I'm kind of numb."

In a statement Alexandria Community Schools superintendent Melissa Brisco said the district "was deeply troubled by Tuesday's assault."

"We want to assure our families and community that we will continue to work hard to provide a safe, caring and supportive learning environment for all our students," she added. As of Friday night, no charges had been filed.

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A hate-crimes law signed in April by Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb allows judges to impose harsher sentences for criminals who victimize others based on race, religion and sexual orientation, among other traits.
He believes the older student attacked him "because of my sexuality."
Two students recorded footage of the assault, authorities confirmed. The fact that they had their phones at the ready, says the victim, suggests it was a planned attacked.
On Friday Alexandria police confirmed they were investigating the incident but "[had] not uncovered any evidence" the victim's sexual orientation played a part, according to the network. "They're trying to say it's not a hate crime," the victim's mother told WISH. "Well, what else do you call it?"
She was on school grounds for a parent-teacher conference when the attack happened, was sent a clip of the assault by a friend.
"I thought I was going to throw up," she said. "In the video, you see my son is backed up against the wall, kind of like a corner of the concrete wall by the mirror. This kid's in front of him and there are kids on either side, blocking his escape. [The 10th-grader] just squats down and starts wailing on his face and head."
The video reportedly shows the student punching her son four times. "It all happened so fast," said the eighth-grader. "The whole thing lasted under a minute."
He reportedly suffered a broken nose, bruised eye and scratches behind his ear. "I don't really feel anything yet," he said. "I'm kind of numb."
In a statement Alexandria Community Schools superintendent Melissa Brisco said the district "was deeply troubled by Tuesday's assault."
"We want to assure our families and community that we will continue to work hard to provide a safe, caring and supportive learning environment for all our students," she added. As of Friday night, no charges had been filed.
A hate-crimes law signed in April by Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb allows judges to impose harsher sentences for criminals who victimize others based on race, religion and sexual orientation, among other traits.

May 27, 2019

Priest in Newark Church Pressed NJ School To Cover Gay Mural Painted by LGBT Students





Mural painted over by school
                           


Jane Clementi, co-founder of the Tyler Clementi Foundation, speaks about NJ’s conversion therapy ban, during an interview at her home in Ridgewood on April 18, 2019. She is the mother of Tyler 
Clementi, who died by suicide after being bullied because he was gay. North Jersey Record 
New Jersey's largest gay rights advocacy group is condemning a Bergen charter school for destroying part of a student's mural that supported the LGBT community.   

The Bergen Arts and Science Charter School in Hackensack, which leases its building from Holy Trinity Church, a Catholic church in Hackensack, painted over part of the mural that a 16-year-old student created because the church found it offensive.  

The group Garden State Equality was enraged by that act, and is asking the Archdiocese of Newark to have the school restore the mural.  

“It is offensive, unconscionable, and flatly unconstitutional for this church acting as a for-profit landlord to restrict a public school’s curriculum or censor student speech within those walls. This type of hate-fueled bigotry is precisely why New Jersey needs LGBTQ-inclusive curriculum to promote acceptance and understanding,” said Garden State Equality Executive Director Christian Fuscarino in a statement. 

A student at the Bergen Arts and Science Charter School painted a mural for an art project. The church, which owns the building, demanded the school paint over a rainbow heart signaling LGBTQ rights.

A student at the Bergen Arts and Science Charter School painted a mural for an art project. The church, which owns the building, demanded the school paint over a rainbow heart signaling LGBTQ rights. (Photo: Student)
Garden State Equality also said that the church has restricted education at Bergen Arts and Science before, including by forcing a school psychologist to remove a poster supportive of LGBT students.

The student who did the mural, a high school junior, told NorthJersey.com and The Record that the school was forced to paint over part of a mural that included a rainbow heart.

   Related image


I would like to ask this priest what in the picture did he find inmoral, ungodly or brought him bad memories of his past? Which one of those?    None? why do this?  I guess he forgot The  name Tyler Clementi, the young man that killed hmself after being bully in the school......Iam starting to think that this so called priest or one like him had something to do with the athmosphere of bullying in school that killed Tyler. I never met tyler but I know about him. If these students are being taught that a rainbow heart is bad because gays painted it, then it most be ok to make fun of them.
BRING THAT MURAL BACK!!  MUral and Moral are so close but I see no morality in those that took part in this. Lets say enough is enough!! 

Adam Gonzalez, Publisher

The Archdiocese of Newark, in a statement released on Thursday, asserted that there was no order to cover the rainbow heart, and that school officials must have made the decision to do so. But the mural did include "some symbols of sexuality that were inappropriate for the building," which is used by church parishioners as well as the school, the statement said.  


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Holy Trinity Church raised two concerns, according to the statement: "First that the school refrain from consistently painting on the building surfaces. Secondly that the school remove some content in a new painting, which included some symbols of sexuality that were inappropriate for the building, as the building is utilized by parishioners of the church as well as the school." 


The Rev. Paul Prevosto, pastor of Holy Trinity Church, told NorthJersey.com that parishioners brought the mural to his attention because of a depiction of male figures that looked "obscene." The mural included abstract figures with interlocking circle and arrow symbols that represent the male gender.

Prevosto also called the mural "offensive" and said he told the school to "take care of it."

The student, who did not want her name published, said her honors art class had painted murals inspired by great artists in the school cafeteria. She painted a piece featuring colorful silhouettes of people and a rainbow heart that was a replica of work by gay artist Keith Haring, whose colorful graffiti-style art gained popularity in the 1980s. 

Distraught by the incident, the student took to Twitter for support. 

"So ...my school's owned by a Catholic Church and they want me to take down my Keith Harring mural that supports the LGBT community," she said. "They think it's inappropriate...I'm heartbroken and I really never thought this could actually happen. Please help." 

The Catholic Church prohibits sexual activity between people of the same gender and its Catechism calls homosexual acts "intrinsically immoral and contrary to the natural law." 

But the church has also emphasized that homosexual people are not inherently sinful and should be welcomed in the faith community. 

Cardinal Joseph Tobin of the Newark Archdiocese has called for the church to be more inclusive, and he has celebrated Mass for openly gay Catholics. 

The school's lease agreement with the school includes a stipulation about Catholic values and states that "anything contrary to our Catholic sensitivity should not be displayed or seen."  

New Jersey this year became the second state in the nation to adopt a law that requires schools to teach about LGBT history, including the political, economic and social contributions of individuals who are gay and transgender. The law takes effect in the next school year.

Officials from Garden State Equality noted that charter schools like Bergen Arts and Science, which are public schools run by private organizations, will be required to comply with the law.

"Decades ago, the United State Supreme Court held that students ‘do not shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate,’” said Garden State Equality board member and former state bar president Thomas Prol. “It is sadly ironic that an educational institution is now delivering a lesson in censorship to these students during their tender years."

Hannan Adely contributed to this story.
North Jersey

, North Jersey Record

December 8, 2018

VP Pence's State of Indiana School's Being Sued for Not Allowing The Students To Use Gay Related language(LGBT,Gay,etc)


By


Fort Wayne LGBT Advocates Respond To ACLU Lawsuit
Rebecca Green/WBOI
The Indiana ACLU sued East Allen County Schools last week, after allegations Leo Jr./Sr. High School administrators restricted students’ use of LGBT language, among other issues. LGBT activists in the Fort Wayne Area say the language used to describe the club mattered.  
The lawsuit filed by the ACLU stated school administrators did not allow students to refer to the club as as 'GSA,' or Gay-Straight Alliance, but rather as Leo Pride, which is a school acronym that stands for, 'Professionalism, Respect, Integrity, Diligence, and Excellence.'
Executive Director of Fort Wayne Pride, Nikki Fultz said while the word 'pride' is often associated with LGBT identity, the decision on what a club like Leo’s calls itself should be left up to students.
"I think words mean quite a bit," Fultz said, "So to say that you can’t say those words, in trying to let students know what’s happening, is a way to make students feel ashamed of who they are."
Fultz said GSA’s have become prevalent in the last few years, creating a sense of inclusivity for those involved in the groups, especially LGBT youths, who are at a higher risk to attempt suicide.
No hearing has been set for the injunction.

August 29, 2018

Nine Yr Old Boy Kills Himself After Enduring Days of Homophobic Bullying


   Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255                                                                     

Jamel Myles killed himself after homophobic bullying at school, his mother said ( CBS )
                                                                         



A nine-year-old boy has taken his own life after enduring four days of homophobic bullying at school, his mother has said. 
Leia Pierce said her son, Jamel Myles, told her over the summer he was gay and wanted to tell his classmates at his school in Denver, Colorado because he was proud of his orientation.
She said Jamel had begun wearing fake fingernails on 20 August, the first day back following the school holiday. Four days later, she found his lifeless body at home. 
The Denver coroner’s office confirmed Jamel died by suicide.
"My child died because of bullying. My baby killed himself,” Mr Pierce told The Denver Post. “He didn’t deserve this. He wanted to make everybody happy even when he wasn’t. I want him back so bad.”
She said Jamel’s eldest sister revealed other children had told the boy to kill himself. 
BBC takes on 'bible bashers' in anti-homophobia video
Counsellors were made available to children, teachers and school staff at Joe Shoemaker Elementary School on Monday, the newspaper reported. 
In a letter sent to families, Denver Public Schools (DPS) said Jamel’s death was an "unexpected loss for our school community". 
The note said: "Our goal is to partner with you in sharing this news with your child in the most appropriate way possible, with as much support as may be needed, so please feel free to reach out about how you want to handle this."
Ms Pierce said that over the summer, Jamel told her he was gay while curled up in the back seat of the family car.
“He was scared because he is a boy and it’s harder on boys when they come out,” Ms Pierce said. “I smiled at him and said I still loved him. This world is missing out.”
She added: “I’m dead inside. He was beautiful. He was magic. I lost my greatest gift.”
For confidential support call Samaritans on 116 123.
In the US, you can contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline for free on 800-273-8255
You can also contact the following organisations for confidential support: https://www.mind.org.uk; https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk
More From Another Source:
DENVER – The mother of a 9-year-old Denver boy who committed suicide last week after being bulliedwent on Facebook to ask people to help stop bullying. She had recently learned her son was gay. 
Jamel Myles, died Thursday after being taken to the hospital, according to a report from the Denver Office of the Medical Examiner.
The manner of death was suicide and did not involve a firearm, the report said.
In her public Facebook post, Leia Pierce wrote, "Please we are all the different and thats what makes us the same because we all have 1 thing in common we're all different thats what makes this world beautiful .. i want justice for my son and every kid who is bullied.. i want bullying to end i never want to hear someone else go thru this pain."
In an interview with KUSA-TV in Denver, Pierce said her son had been bullied because he was gay.
According to KDVR-TV in Denver, Myles came out to his mother as gay over the summer. 
"And he looked so scared when he told me. He was like, 'Mom I’m gay.' And I thought he was playing, so I looked back because I was driving, and he was all curled up, so scared. And I said, I still love you," Pierce said, according to KDVR. 
Pierce said Myles wanted to tell his classmates. He was a fourth grade student at Joe Shoemaker School. Classes started Aug. 20, KDVR reported. Myles died Thursday. 
Pierce also wrote in a post: "My son died because of being bullied please tell ur kids to love everyone we all need to love each other."
Shoemaker Principal Christine Fleming sent a letter to parents Friday about Myles' death.
"It is with extreme sadness we share with you that one of our fourth-grade students, passed away yesterday. This is an unexpected loss for our school community," the letter said.
The letter also says Shoemaker staff had not informed students as of Friday afternoon and that, "We are leaving the decision on how this is communicated to your child to your discretion as you know your child best."
The Denver Public School District crisis team and a school social worker were available for students Monday.
"Our thoughts are with the student’s family at this time. We will continue to process this sad news as a school community," the letter says.
On Monday afternoon, the district sent out an updated statement. In it, a spokesperson specifically says all members of the "school community are treated with dignity and respect, regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity, or transgender status."
It continued with the following:
"It is critical that our students receive all the supports they need to learn and thrive in a safe and welcoming environment. Our formal policies and practices reflect this commitment to ensuring that our LGBTQ+ students can pursue their education with dignity – from policies and training to prevent and stop bullying to formal policies and guidance materials that fully respect gender identity (including use of preferred pronouns and restrooms).
"Our priority right now is to help all students and adults with the grief they are experiencing and to better understand all the facts surrounding this tragic loss."
Pierce wished she had known about the bullying Myles received.
"I lost a reason to breathe... my heart, my sunshine, my son... he was being bullied and i didnt know. Not till it was to late.. i wish i knew everything so i could've stopped this," Pierce wrote in a Facebook post.
Caitlin Hendee and Jordan Chavez, KUSA-TV, Denver
Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255

June 22, 2018

NJ School Gets Sued Over A Bullied Girl's Suicide

Photo of Mallory Grossman

The parents of a 12-year-old girl who took her own life are suing the school district in the US state of New Jersey, saying it failed to prevent bullying.
Dianne and Seth Grossman say the school ignored repeated complaints that their daughter was being targeted.
The legal action says Mallory was sent text and Snapchat messages calling her a "loser", making fun of her looks, and prompting her to end her life.
Rockaway Township school district declined to comment on the lawsuit.
Filed on Tuesday, nearly a year after Mallory's death on 14 June 2017, the lawsuit accuses Copeland Middle School of failing to take significant action to prevent bullying.
It alleges that the school's response was to force Mallory to hug one of her alleged bullies, in lieu of disciplinary action, and accuses the school district of discouraging her parents from making a formal complaint.
Photograph of Mallory and her mother

Administrators also suggested she avoid her harassers by eating in an office instead of the lunchroom, the lawsuit alleges.
The school district issued a statement in August of last year saying "the allegation that the Rockaway Township School District ignored the Grossman family and failed to address bullying in general, is categorically false".
The statement also said that school officials had been directed not to comment further on the case.
Speaking at a news conference on Tuesday, the Grossmans' attorney, Bruce Nagel, said complaints to the school had been "terribly ignored" and called smart phones "a lethal weapon in the hands of the wrong child".
"We are hopeful that the filing of this lawsuit will bring national awareness to the epidemic of cyber-bullying and that we do not have to attend any more funerals of students who have been the victims," Mr Nagel said.
Mrs Grossman told News 12 she wanted the school to "care less about test scores and care about the emotional intelligence" of children.
"Instead of removing Mallory from choir class," she said, "I wanted the girls that were tapping her chair every other day and calling her a [expletive] - I wanted those children removed from class. Not Mallory."
The lawsuit is the first cyber-bullying suicide case filed in New Jersey. The families of the group of girls accused of bullying Mallory have been notified that they could face legal action, Mr Nagel said.
School personnel and the township as a whole were also named in the lawsuit for failing to ensure children's safety in a local school.
In a letter posted on the school's website in April, the town's board of education said school superintendent Greg McGann, who is named as a defendant in the lawsuit, would be "commencing a leave of absence" through 30 June 2018.

How to get help
From Canada or US: If you're in an emergency, please call 911
You can contact the US National Suicide Prevention Lifeline on 1-800-273-8255 or the Crisis Test Line by texting HOME to 741741
Young people in need of help can call Kids Help Phone on 1-800-668-6868
If you are in the UK, you can call the Samaritans on 116123

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