Showing posts with label Fired. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Fired. Show all posts

March 16, 2018

Swampscott, MA. Principal Fired After Coming Out as Transgender

  
SWAMPSCOTT, MA (WHDH) - A Swampscott Elementary School principal has been let go after coming out as transgender.
Principal Shannon Daniels, formerly Tom, was put on paid administration leave for the remainder of the school year and then her contract was not renewed.
School officials say the decision was made before Daniels announced he would be transitioning to female.
The superintendent of the school says many parents made complaints about Daniels’ teaching methods prior to the announcement.

December 13, 2017

Reporter Who Got Scaramucchi Gets Fired by NYorker For Sexual Misconduct



 Ryan Lizza (Neilson Barnard / Getty Images)
 
 


Ryan Lizza, the prominent Washington correspondent for the New Yorker whose reporting earlier this year led to the ouster of President Trump's communications director, has been fired for sexual misconduct.
The New Yorker on Monday announced the firing of Lizza in a statement, saying it had recently learned Lizza "engaged in what we believe was improper sexual conduct."
"We have reviewed the matter and, as a result, have severed ties with Lizza," it continued.
Lizza also provided commentary for CNN, which issued a statement moments after the New Yorker announcement, saying the network was suspending Lizza "while we look into this matter."
In an email to BuzzFeed News, Lizza denied the accusations, saying he was "dismayed that the New Yorker has decided to characterize a respectful relationship with a woman I dated as somehow inappropriate."
"The New Yorker was unable to cite any company policy that was violated," he continued. "I am sorry to my friends, workplace colleagues, and loved ones for any embarrassment this episode may cause. I love the New Yorker, my home for the last decade, and I have the highest regard for the people who work there. But this decision, which was made hastily and without a full investigation of the relevant facts, was a terrible mistake."
Following the firing, law firm Wigdor LLP said it was representing an accuser and that "in no way did Mr. Lizza's misconduct constitute a 'respectful relationship' as he has now tried to characterize it."
Lizza has covered politics for years but gained particular prominence earlier this year when Anthony Scaramucci — who at the time was President Trump's communications director — called him to rant about leaks at the White House and other members of the administration. During the call, Scaramucci infamously said that he was not "trying to suck my own cock" like then–senior White House counselor Steve Bannon.
Scaramucci was ousted four days after the publication of Lizza's story about the phone call.
Lizza's firing comes amid a major reckoning within the media, politics, and entertainment industries over sexual harassment. Beginning with allegations against film mogul Harvey Weinstein in October, there has been a nearly continuous series of reports about powerful men accused of sexual assault, rape, and other forms of harassment. Other journalists fired or suspended over allegations of improper sexual behavior include Charlie Rose, Matt Lauer, and Glenn Thrush.
Media figures have also come under particular scrutiny thanks to the "shitty media men" list, which began as a privately circulated documented that included men's names along with anonymous accusations against them.
Jim Dalrymple II

November 17, 2017

Brand New Editor for Gay times Josh River Apologized-- Not Enough For His Offensive Tweets, He Was Fired




 Josh Rivers




The editor of the Gay Times has been fired just weeks after taking up the role after anti-Semitic and misogynistic tweets were uncovered. 
Josh Rivers sent a series of tweets between 2010 and 2015 which made offensive comments about women, Jewish people, Chinese people, lesbians, transgender people, and people he thought were overweight or ugly. 
The magazine said that all of his articles have now been removed from the website and he has been dismissed from his post.  
Among the offensive messages was one which said an actor cast as a Jewish person had a "f------- ridiculously larger honker of a nose" and another which tweeted approvingly a quote from US animation Family Guy:  “Jews are gross. It’s the only religion with ‘ew’ in it."Another said: "I’ve just seen a girl in the tightest white tank & lord help me if she’s not pregnant, she should be killed. #gross”
Another message read: "I hope that piece of machinery that asshole lesbian next door has been using since 8am cuts off her goddamn hand. 
Yet another message read:" I'm thankful for TFL (Transport for London) andrising bus fares. Let's keep homeless people on the streets  and off our buses" 

Mr. Rivers was appointed the editor of the magazine last month and would have been the UK's first non-white editor of a gay men's magazine. 
Announcing his appointment at the end of last month the magazine said choosing Mr. Rivers, a former marketing manager, was a “strategic move to best serve the magazine’s diverse and culturally inquisitive audience”.
The tweets were discovered by Buzzfeed News, which put them to Mr. Rivers in an interview to mark his appointment. 
In response, he apologized and said they showed "self-loathing, a complete unawareness of the world around me and a disregard for others that I find deeply upsetting". 
Mr. Rivers later posted a statement on the social network calling the tweets "abhorrent", "ugly" and "hateful". 
"I hope we can use this as an opportunity for growth, for healing, for moving forward," he added.

Gay Times announced on Wednesday that he had been suspended. In a statement, it said: "Josh Rivers' past tweets do not align with the values of Gay Times, or any of our employees, in any capacity. 
"Josh has been suspended with immediate effect while we investigate the facts. Appropriate action will be taken in due course."
On Thursday morning it said that "his employment has been suspended with immediate effect". 
"We sincerely apologize for the offense that has been caused, particularly to those members of our wider community to whom such inappropriate and unacceptable commentary was the focus," a spokesman said.
{Telegraph UK}

May 10, 2017

Trump Fires FBI Director Comey As He Investigated Trump’s Connect to Putin


Watergate memories


 President Trump on Tuesday fired the director of the F.B.I., James B. Comey, abruptly terminating the law enforcement official leading a wide-ranging criminal investigation into whether Mr. Trump’s advisers colluded with the Russian government to steer the outcome of the 2016 presidential election.

The stunning development in Mr. Trump’s presidency raised the specter of political interference by a sitting president into an existing investigation by the nation’s leading law enforcement agency. It immediately ignited Democratic calls for an independent prosecutor to lead the Russia inquiry.

Mr. Trump explained the firing by citing Mr. Comey’s handling of the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server, even though the president was widely seen to have benefited politically from that inquiry and had once praised Mr. Comey for having “guts” in his pursuit of Mrs. Clinton during the campaign.

But in his letter to Mr. Comey, released to reporters by the White House, the president betrayed his focus on the continuing inquiry into Russia and his aides.
“While I greatly appreciate you informing me, on three separate occasions, that I am not under investigation, I nevertheless concur with the judgment of the Department of Justice that you are not able to effectively lead the bureau,” Mr. Trump said in a letter to Mr. Comey dated Tuesday.

The White House said Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the deputy attorney general, Rod J. Rosenstein, pushed for Mr. Comey’s dismissal.

“I cannot defend the director’s handling of the conclusion of the investigation of Secretary Clinton’s emails,” Mr. Rosenstein wrote in a letter that was released by the White House, “and I do not understand his refusal to accept the nearly universal judgment that he was mistaken.”

Reaction in Washington was swift and fierce. In a call with Mr. Trump, Senator Chuck Schumer, the Democratic leader, told the president he was making a big mistake; publicly, Mr. Schumer said the firing could make Americans suspect a cover-up. Many Republicans assailed the president for making a rash decision that could have deep implications for their party. 

Most of the F.B.I., learned from news reports that he had been fired while addressing bureau employees in Los Angeles. While Mr. Comey spoke, television screens in the background began flashing the news. In response to the reports, Mr. Comey laughed, saying that he thought it was a fairly funny prank.

But shortly after, Mr. Trump’s letter was delivered to F.B.I. Headquarters in Washington.

The sudden dismissal of one of Washington’s most prominent officials added to the sense of chaos in a White House that has been roiled by controversy, dogged by scandal and engaged in a furious fight with adversaries.

Mr. Trump had already fired his acting attorney general for insubordination and his national security adviser for lying to the vice president about contacts with Russians. But firing Mr. Comey raises much deeper questions about the independence of the F.B.I. and the future of its investigations under Mr. Trump.

F.B.I. officers were enraged by the firing and worried openly that Mr. Trump would appoint someone seen as a White House ally. Mr. Comey was widely liked in the F.B.I., even by those who criticized his handling of the Clinton investigation, and officers regarded him as a good manager and an independent leader.

Mr. Comey was on Capitol Hill last week when he offered his first public explanation of his handling of the Clinton email case. He said he had no regrets about the decisions he made, but said he felt “mildly nauseous” that his actions might have tipped the election to Mr. Trump.

Last July, Mr. Comey broke with longstanding tradition and policies by publicly discussing the Clinton case and chastising her “careless” handling of classified information. Then, in the campaign’s final days, Mr. Comey announced that the F.B.I. was reopening the investigation, a move that earned him widespread criticism.

Yet many of the facts cited as evidence for Mr. Comey’s dismissal were well known when Mr. Trump kept him on the job: Mr. Comey was three years in to a 10-year term. And both Mr. Trump and his attorney general, Jeff Sessions, had praised Mr. Comey back then for reopening the Clinton investigation by saying his public announcement “took guts.” On Tuesday, that action was at the heart of Mr. Comey’s firing.

“It is essential that we find new leadership for the F.B.I. that restores public trust and confidence in its vital law enforcement mission,” Mr. Trump wrote.

Officials at the F.B.I. said they learned through news reports of Mr. Comey’s dismissal, which Mr. Trump described as effective immediately. The president has the authority to fire the F.B.I. director for any reason.

Comey Tried to Shield the F.B.I. From Politics. Then He Shaped an Election.

As the F.B.I. investigated Hillary Clinton and the Trump campaign, James B. Comey tried to keep the bureau out of politics but plunged it into the center of a bitter election.
Under the F.B.I.’s normal rules of succession, Mr. Comey’s deputy, Andrew G. McCabe, a career F.B.I. officer, becomes acting director. The White House said the search for a director will begin immediately.

The firing puts Democrats in a difficult position. Many had hoped that Mrs. Clinton would fire Mr. Comey soon after taking office, and blamed him for costing her the election. But under Mr. Trump, the outspoken and independent-minded Mr. Comey was seen as an important check on the new administration.

“Any attempt to stop or undermine this F.B.I. investigation would raise grave constitutional issues,” said Senator Richard J. Durbin, Democrat of Illinois. “We await clarification by the White House as soon as possible as to whether this investigation will continue and whether it will have a credible lead so that we know that it’ll have a just outcome.”

Senator Roy Blunt, Republican of Missouri, praised Mr. Comey’s service but said new leadership at the F.B.I. “will restore confidence in the organization.”

“Many, including myself, have questioned his actions more than once over the last year,” Mr. Blunt, who sits on the Senate Intelligence Committee, said in a statement.

Mr. Trump’s decision to fire Mr. Comey marks the second time since taking office that the president has fired a top law enforcement official. In early February, Mr. Trump fired Sally Q. Yates, who had worked in the Obama administration but was serving as acting attorney general.

But the president’s firing of Mr. Comey was far more consequential. Ms. Yates was a holdover, and would have served in the Trump administration for only a matter of days or weeks.

A longtime prosecutor who served as the deputy attorney general during the George W. Bush administration, Mr. Comey came into office in 2013 with widespread bipartisan support. He has essentially been in a public feud with Mr. Trump since long before the presidential election.

In a Twitter message this week, Mr. Trump accused Mr. Comey of being “the best thing that ever happened to Hillary Clinton,” accusing him of giving her “a free pass for many bad deeds.” 

Senator Ron Wyden, Democrat of Oregon and a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said in a post on Twitter that Mr. Comey “should be immediately called to testify in an open hearing about the status of Russia/Trump investigation at the time he was fired.”

Sean Spicer, the White House press secretary, offered a veiled hint of the bombshell earlier in the day on Tuesday, though no reporters picked up on it.

During his daily briefing, Mr. Spicer was asked — as he frequently is — whether Mr. Comey still has the confidence of the president. Instead of saying yes, Mr. Spicer danced around the question.

“I have no reason to believe — I haven’t asked him,” Mr. Spicer said. “I have not asked the president since the last time we spoke about this.”

A reporter noted that Mr. Spicer had previously indicated that the president did have confidence in Mr. Comey, but asked whether recent revelations about Mr. Comey’s misstatement during testimony on Capitol Hill would change that.

“In light of what you’re telling me, I don’t want to start speaking on behalf of the president without speaking to him first,” Mr. Spicer said.

The president’s decision to fire Mr. Comey appeared to be the culmination of the bad will between the men that intensified in early March, when the president posted Twitter messages accusing former President Barack Obama of wiretapping his office.

The next morning, word spread quickly that Mr. Comey wanted the Justice Department to issue a statement saying that he had no evidence to support the president’s accusation. The department did not issue such a statement.




The Watergate of the 21st Century!

 The Bloody Saturday.  Nixon did all this to protect himself but this precipitated his resignation before he was impeached.


 In dramatically casting aside James B. Comey, President Trump fired the man who may have helped make him president — and the man who potentially most threatened the future of his presidency.

Not since Watergate has a president dismissed the person leading an investigation bearing on him, and Mr. Trump’s decision late Tuesday afternoon drew instant comparisons to the “Saturday Night Massacre” in October 1973, when President Richard M. Nixon ordered the firing of Archibald Cox, the special prosecutor looking into the so-called third-rate burglary that would eventually bring Nixon down.

In his letter firing Mr. Comey, the F.B.I. director, Mr. Trump made a point of noting that Mr. Comey had three times told the president that he was not under investigation, Mr. Trump’s way of pre-emptively denying that his action was self-interested. But in fact, he had plenty at stake, given that Mr. Comey had said publicly that the bureau was investigating Russia’s meddling in last year’s presidential election and whether any associates of Mr. Trump’s campaign were coordinating with Moscow.

The decision stunned members of both parties, who saw it as a brazen act sure to inflame an already politically explosive investigation. For all his unconventional actions in his nearly four months as president, Mr. Trump still has the capacity to shock, and the notion of firing an F.B.I. director in the middle of such an investigation crossed all the normal lines.

Deputy Attorney General’s Memo Breaks Down Case Against Comey MAY 9, 2017
Mr. Trump may have assumed that Democrats so loathed Mr. Comey because of his actions last year in the investigation of Hillary Clinton’s private email server that they would support or at least acquiesce to the dismissal. But if so, he miscalculated, as Democrats rushed to condemn the move and demand that a special counsel be appointed to ensure that the Russia investigation be independent of the president.

The move exposed Mr. Trump to the suspicion that he has something to hide and could strain his relations with fellow Republicans who may be wary of defending him when they do not have all the facts. Many Republicans issued cautious statements on Tuesday, but a few expressed misgivings about Mr. Comey’s dismissal and called for a special congressional investigation or independent commission to take over from the House and Senate Intelligence Committees now looking into the Russia episode.

The appointment of a successor to Mr. Comey could touch off a furious fight since anyone Mr. Trump would choose would automatically come under suspicion. A confirmation fight could easily distract Mr. Trump’s White House at a time when it wants the Senate to focus on passing legislation to repeal former President Barack Obama’s health care law.

Mr. Trump did little to help his case by arguing that he was dismissing Mr. Comey over his handling of the investigation into Mrs. Clinton’s email, given that he vowed as a candidate to throw her in prison if he won. Few found it plausible that the president was truly bothered by Mr. Comey’s decision to publicly announce days before the election that he was reopening the case, a move Mrs. Clinton and other Democrats have said tilted the election toward Mr. Trump.

“It’s beyond credulity to think that Donald Trump fired Jim Comey because of the way he handled Hillary Clinton’s emails,” John D. Podesta, who was Mrs. Clinton’s campaign chairman, said in an interview. “Now more than ever, it’s time for an independent investigation.”


Mr. Podesta noted that Attorney General Jeff Sessions had recommended the dismissal. “The attorney general who said he recused himself on all the Russia matters recommended the firing of the F.B.I. director in charge of investigating the Russia matters,” he said.

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