Showing posts with label Gay Politics. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Gay Politics. Show all posts

September 6, 2018

Politics Upside Down: LGBTQ Support Used As A Wedge Against Anti Gay Pols in Red States



                                                                         

 


, USA TODAY

When Indiana Sen. Joe Donnelly was elected to the Senate in 2012, he asserted that marriage is between a man and a woman. But as the endangered Democrat campaigns for re-election, Donnelly is touting his support for gay rights.
“Joe is proud to stand with LGBTQ Hoosiers,” his campaign said in a fundraising appeal in June that led with a photo of Donnelly marching in the Cadillac Barbie Indiana Pride Parade.
Donnelly is not the only red-state Democrat who went from opposing same-sex marriage in 2012 to viewing it as an issue that could help boost him over the finish line this year.
Others include North Dakota’s Heidi Heitkamp, Missouri’s Claire McCaskill and Montana’s Jon Tester. They represent the unity the party now has on gay rights, which still divide Republicans.
"We must end discrimination in any form," Heitkamp said in June in a  tweet that included a photo of her with the message "NO H8" written on her cheek.  
In a midterm election in which Democrats have more Senate seats to defend – including several in “Trump states” – vulnerable Democrats like Heitkamp could benefit from the growing political power of the LGBTQ movement. A record number of LGBTQ candidates are running for office. And the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) has significantly expanded its grassroots activity in an effort to “pull the emergency brake on the Trump-Pence administration’s hate-fueled agenda.”
Top-priority states are Arizona, Michigan, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin –mostly swing states that play a big role in presidential elections as well as having Senate, gubernatorial or other important races this year.
But even red-state Democrats could benefit from HRC’s effort to identify – and target – millions of “equality” voters across the country who are more likely than others to support “pro-LGBTQ policies” and to oppose candidates who don’t.
The group has identified more than 500,000 sympathetic voters in Indiana and Missouri, for example, and nearly 100,000 in Montana.
“LGBTQ people do not just live in New York and L.A.,” said JoDee Winterhof, HRC’s senior vice president for policy and political affairs. “We live all over this beautiful country.” 
Donnelly, Heitkamp, Tester and other Democratic senators switched their positions on same-sex marriage in 2013 as the Supreme Court began considering the question.
“I’m proud to support marriage equality because no one should be able to tell a Montanan or any American who they can love and who they can marry,” Tester wrote on Facebook in March 2013. In the 2012 campaign, Tester had said that while he backed civil unions for committed same-sex couples, “in Montana, marriage is between one man and one woman.”
“This is an issue that in the last 20 years has seen such a shift legally, a shift politically, and just a shift in public opinion,” said Paul Helmke, an Indiana University civics professor and former GOP officeholder. “The politicians were trying to catch up with the courts as much as anything.”
Only 37 percent of the public supported allowing gays and lesbians to marry legally in 2007, compared with 62 percent who did in 2017, after the Supreme Court ruled in 2015 that same-sex couples have a fundamental right to marry, according to the Pew Research Center.
Among Republicans, however, opinion is still nearly evenly divided. The reasons are a combination of age and religion, said Geoffrey Layman, a political science professor at the University of Notre Dame who has written a book about religious and cultural conflicts in party politics.
“Older people and more religious people tend to be less supportive of same-sex marriage, and the Republican coalition is both older and more religious,” Layman said.

In fact, as Donnelly marched in the Indianapolis gay pride parade this summer, Indiana Republicans were fighting over whether the party should continue to back marriage as a union “between a man and a woman.”
Mike Braun, the Republican hoping to knock off Donnelly this fall, joined social conservatives in fending off a change to the language included in the party's platform when Vice President Mike Pence was governor.
“There was an overwhelming part of the party that wanted to stick with traditional marriage,” Braun said in an interview recently.
Around the same time, Log Cabin Republicans in Texas succeeded in removing from the state GOP platform language calling homosexuality a “chosen behavior that ... must not be presented as an acceptable alternative lifestyle.” But the party continues to define marriage as a “God-ordained, legal, and moral commitment only between one natural man and one natural woman.”
Still, Gregory Angelo, the national president of Log Cabin Republicans, said that while there remains a difference of opinion in the party, there is a consensus that opposition to same-sex marriage as the centerpiece of someone’s campaign is no longer a winning strategy.
The larger problem for Republicans, he said, is that even if the issue is not front-and-center in elections, voters – especially younger ones – still look to a candidate's positions on equality  as a “cultural litmus test that can provide greater insight into where a candidate’s heart and conscience really lies.”
“What you’re seeing in 2018 is Democratic candidates who are using their support for the LGBT community as a wedge issue to drive supporters to the voting booth,” he said, “and to vilify Republicans who oppose them.”

May 15, 2018

Every Lesbian, Bisexual, Queer And/Or Trans Woman Running for US Office in 2018



                                                                      🦊




April 13, 2018

In Iowa A GOP Gov Wanted an Anti LGBT BD OF Med. Candidate But The Dem Senate Rejected it


This is happens twice in the span of the year and twice is been put down with candidates that seem qualify except in Social Issues. You can't have some one for the Board of Medicine who beleive some of the people he'she is going to serve are sick or religious unfit. The person needs to have respect for all and the law. Last year it was an anti abortion candidate.  These reinforces things we know, that if we have a legislature/congress froma party that beleie in scial justice even a wild card on a Governnor can be restrained to do the right thing. If this was so natioanlly we would a different world right now!  🦊

Gov. Reynolds’ nominee for a position on the Iowa Board of Medicine went down to defeat in a  confirmation vote in  the Iowa Senate today.  
Nevada resident Katherine Asjes is the wife of a NATO flight officer with a background in public relations who has lived all over the world, but settled in Iowa in 2005.     
The Senate voted 30 to 18 for confirmation, short of the two-thirds majority required. 
Senate Democrats objected to a post on a Catholic blog in which Asjes agreed with negative views about the LGBT community.    
“Our caucus is interested in making sure that anyone appointed to the Board of Medicine will protect the health of all Iowans,” said Senate Minority Leader Janet Petersen.   “After doing some research there were some concerns, red flags, caused pause in moving that confirmation forward.”
An entry on The Catholic World Report criticized a movement in the Catholic Church to accept gays and lesbians.  The entry goes on to say that when the Church began to focus on the unitive rather than procreative aspects of sex, that led to the acceptance of homosexuality.     
“I completely agree with all you have said here,” Katherine Asjes wrote on the blog. 
Urbandale Republican Brad Zaun called Asjes more than qualified for a position on the Board of Medicine.  He called it “disgusting” that Asjes was opposed  for one comment on a blog.
“So we bring her down, her whole family down,” Zaun said. “Freedom of speech only works on this side of the aisle.” 
Petersen said she advised Gov. Reynolds that the confirmation was in  trouble, but the governor did not take Asjes out of consideration.  
In a statement, the governor’s spokeswoman Brenna Smith called the vote disappointing. 
“Senate Democrats voted down a well-qualified nominee who wanted to give her time and talents to the State of Iowa,” Smith said.   
Last year,  Senate Democrats defeated Gov. Branstad’s nominees Diane Clark and Hamid Tewfik for additional terms on the Board of Medicine because of their votes against telemed abortions.     
“This is the Board of Medicine,” Peterson said last year.  “This is not Gov. Branstad and Kim Reynolds' board that they politically stack with people who won't back a woman's constitutional right for a legal medical procedure.”   
It is adamfoxie's 10th🦊Anniversay. 10 years witnessing the world and bringing you a pieace whcih is ussually not getting its due coverage. 4.9 Million Reads

March 15, 2018

Fort Lauderdale Elects its First Gay Mayor



 Dean Trantalis Celebrates his win



FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Voters in Fort Lauderdale elected the city's first openly gay mayor Tuesday.
{{By Peter Burke - Local10.com Managing Editor}}

Dean Trantalis defeated Bruce Roberts in a runoff election to replace longtime Mayor Jack Seiler.

Trantalis received more than 5,800 votes than Roberts.

Fort Lauderdale Mayor
100% of Precincts Reporting (69/69)
Dean Trantalis 
12,906 VOTES
64% » Winner
Bruce Roberts 
7,082 VOTES
35%

Trantalis, 64, has been serving as a city commissioner since 2009 and is a longtime champion of equal rights.

Roberts, a former Fort Lauderdale police chief, is the current vice mayor. The 70-year-old was first elected commissioner in 2009 but is facing term limits.

Democratic gubernatorial candidates Gwen Graham and Philip Levine took to Twitter to congratulate Trantalis, as did U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Florida.

A decade ago, then-Fort Lauderdale Mayor Jim Naugle made headlines after he said the city needed to buy single-occupancy public toilets on the beach to "reduce homosexual sex in bathrooms." He also opposed a plan to put a collection of gay and lesbian literature in a public library. It was ultimately approved.

Naugle's comments drew the ire of gay residents, including Trantalis, who became the city's first openly gay elected official in 2003. Trantalis decided not to seek re-election in 2006, but he was an outspoken opponent of Naugle's anti-gay message.

Trantalis previously ran for mayor in 2009 but lost to Seiler.

Steven Glassman, who is also openly gay, handily defeated opponent Tim Smith for one of the city's two open commission seats.

From Miami Herald:

In Fort Lauderdale, Dean Trantalis, 64, a Wilton Manors attorney, defeated Bruce Roberts, 70, the city’s former police chief, to replace longtime mayor Jack Seiler, who could not run because of term limits. Trantalis will be the city’s first openly gay mayor.
Trantalis, who served on the commission from 2002 to 2006 and was elected again in 2013, garnered about 65 percent of the votes. Roberts received about 35 percent.
In Hallandale Beach, five people vied to fill a seat left vacant by Anthony Sanders, who resigned in August after the Broward Inspector General’s Office accused him of funneling nearly $1 million into his non-profit organization. 
The candidates included Mike Butler, Ann “Annie” Henigson ,William “Bill” Julian, Thomas W. Sands and John Stassi.
Butler, a political newcomer, received 61 percent of the vote. Julian was the second closest with about 23 percent of the vote.
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Mike Butler won a seat on the Hallandale Beach City Commission, Tuesday, March 13, 2108.

Butler will join a Hallandale Beach commission embroiled in controversy. In January, Mayor Joy Cooper was arrested on felony charges including money laundering and campaign finance violations. After she was removed from office, Vice Mayor Keith London became the city’s mayor, leaving his seat open.
Tuesday’s vote means Butler will serve until November, when Sanders’ term would have ended.
Meanwhile, Coral Springs and Pompano Beach asked residents for millions of dollars to fund infrastructure improvements. In Coral Springs, voters rejected all three of the ballot questions, totaling $77.8 million. In Pompano Beach, voters approved all three projects totaling $181 million.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/broward/article205013604.html#storylink=cpy
It is adamfoxie's 10th🦊Anniversay. 10 years witnessing the world and bringing you a pieace whcih is ussually not getting its due coverage.



July 19, 2017

A Politican Member of The HRC in Cincinnati Spouses Don't ask Don't Tell About Being Gay





Steve Newsome is a Walnut Hills resident and a member of the Human Rights Campaign's board of governors.
Recently, the GOP in Hamilton County endorsed an openly gay man for Cincinnati City Council. For many of us who have been working to advance LGBTQ equality, this was to be a full-circle moment. The potential of a Republican who could represent our issues to a constituency that has traditionally been averse to LGBTQ equality, to put it mild terms, is big.
Instead, this candidate, through hubris or inexperience, proclaimed a “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” approach going as far to say his sexuality, implying anyone’s sexuality, doesn’t matter to their particular job. There are three main problems with this glib statement.
First, in Ohio and twelve other states, people can be fired, discriminated against and denied housing because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. While one’s orientation or gender identity may not affect one’s ability to perform the tasks of a job necessarily, it absolutely affects one’s ability to work a job. That may be as simple as answering a question from a co-worker about what they did the previous weekend or speaking to photos they saw on Facebook.

We need politicians who understand that workers bring their identity to work. As businesses who understand can attest, when an employee brings their full self to work, they are a happier, more productive employee. Furthermore, we need politicians with the emotional intelligence to understand their own personal experiences influence their decisions and thus influence the lives of those they represent. As an LGBTQ candidate, official or leader, we do not simply speak for ourselves. We speak for those among us, our friends, our neighbors, and those most without a voice in our community.
The second problem related to denying identity matters in politics and life, is that the entire civil rights movement is based on our personal stories. Any politician would tell you it is easy to say no to an issue, but it is much harder to say no to a person. It was not long ago in Cincinnati that the LGBTQ community was not welcome. Article XII not only was discriminatory, but it was economically damaging to our city, costing us billions in revenue from conventions, business and citizens. 
The effort put forward to repeal such a discriminatory and damaging law, was not complex. Nor was the road to marriage equality, frankly. These efforts, the efforts of the LGBTQ movement, are to explain to people that while we may live our lives with a person of the same gender, or identify as a gender not assigned to us at birth, our outwardly by society, that we are people with rights and dreams nonetheless. We do not want to, nor should we, hide the fact that we are now engaged, married, having children or simply living our truth in a free society. Stories like friends who were booted from the military, gay-bashed on the street, or a love story where a spouse simply wanted to be listed as a spouse on a death certificate brought us to where we are today. Anyone who denies that these stories matter is sorely mistaken and has not been with our community doing the work.
Finally, the most perplexing problem in this story is the messenger himself. Here was a golden opportunity to truly be a leader, not only in the LGBTQ community, but in the Republican Party. Someone on the inside, who could champion conservative values within the lens of supporting equality along the way would no doubt impact creating a more diverse and inclusive city in a monumental way. The LGBTQ community needs support from Republicans. On the national level we have some great partners in the GOP from Sen. Susan Collins to Sen. Lisa Murkowski and locally there are Republicans like Judge Lisa Allen who have been endorsed by LGBTQ groups. Framing our community’s issues, however, in a conservative lens does not include forsaking our identity or boiling it down to being inconsequential.
It would seem the GOP’s own LGBT candidate for City Council is perpetuating the bigoted lie that our issues are about what happens in the privacy of our own lives. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Steve Newsome
Cincinnati.com



June 22, 2017

Sir Ian Mckellan Says It's un-American for Trump Not to Defend Gay Rights









During an interview at the Variety Studio in Cannes Lions, the actor Ian McKellen had harsh words for President Donald Trump if he fails to follow through — as seems to be the case — on a campaign promise to protect the rights of the LGBT community.
Asked about the administration’s attempts to roll back gay and transgender protections, McKellen said, “If what you’re saying is true, it’s appalling and quite unnecessary and very un-American. The gay rights movement began in America. It began in San Francisco, it began in Stonewall, the city where Donald Trump was born and thrived.”
The White House has refused to acknowledge June as Pride Month. In March, Trump quietly rolled back an Obama-era rule, Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Executive Order. Many argue that the move leaves female and LGBT employees of federal contractors venerable to discrimination. 

McKellen, the most recent openly gay actor to be nominated for an Oscar, admitted he’s not sure what Trump believes. “I can’t follow Mr. Trump,” McKellen said. “I don’t always understand what he says and when I do, I have to admit later that I got it wrong because he changed his mind or changed his mind about what he said. He’s a very bad communicator, at least to me. Get more straightforward, Donald. And then we can take you seriously.”

McKellen arrived at the annual advertising conference in the South of France with an initiative, co-sponsored by the European branding company the Brooklyn Brothers and TV production house Brown Eyed Boy, to solicit short films that re-imagine iconic characters as gay (winners will be broadcast on Facebook).
The actor known for playing Magneto in the “X-Men” franchise spoke about the lack of gay characters in major Hollywood tentpoles. “I wouldn’t say the films coming out of the mainstream are quite as related to what’s going on in the real world as I would like them to be,” McKellen told Variety. “One indication of that is LGBT people don’t really get quite a big enough say. If you’re one of those initials yourself, you do notice that actually, these movies are not about me at all.”
Hollywood has yet to greenlight a comic-book movie anchored by a gay superhero. “Frankly looking at the images of some of these superheroes it’s a surprise to me they aren’t gay,” joked McKellen.
He expressed disappointment that his costume for Magneto isn’t quite as flamboyant as it was in the comics. “I wasn’t allowed to wear that outfit,” McKellen said. “I don’t look like Magneto in the comics — always shot from the crotch level.”
McKellen had a suggestion for rebooting the James Bond franchise with a gay 007. “I do have an idea,” McKellen said. “I think Ian Fleming, who wrote the original books, knew all about [it]. I’m not sure subsequent actors have quite understood the joke, which is the same as Superman. James Bond is a wimp! He’s a silly Englishman that wants his martinis stirred. He changes his underwear, like Superman, and he can save the world. They all play it the same — he’s heroic all the way through. No, he’s not.”
“If you play James Bond as an outwardly camp, silly gay man that no one took seriously and then he turned out as many gay men are underneath their clothes — buff and strong and as hetero as any hetero — we might have a more truthful story than the one that has been told,” McKellen said.
Would he want to play this new Bond? “I’m not volunteering,” he said. “I’m insisting. No, I’m too old to play it. I can be on the periphery of this new version.”
With all the recent talk of diversity at the Oscars, one statistic still goes unnoticed. There hasn’t been an openly gay actor nominated for an Oscar in 15 years — since McKellen was recognized for his work in “Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring” as the wizard Gandalf.
“It’s hard isn’t it?” McKellen said. “It’s probably because there are few remaining very talented actors who aren’t quite out of the closet in the way one would like for them to be for their own health and good. I don’t think there’s anything sinister about it. I was only the second openly gay man to receive a knighthood. Records are being broken day by day.”

May 27, 2017

Gay Prime Minister of Ireland in the Works






Ireland appears set to elect its first openly gay prime minister (or Taoiseach) on June 2. Leo Varadkar has built a wide lead in the race to succeed Enda Kenny, who announced his departure after serving as the country's premier for more than six years.
Varadkar is currently the Minister for Social Protection and is the favorite to replace Kenny as both the Fine Gael party leader and the head of government. If elected, he would also become the country's first leader of Asian immigrant descent and, at 38, the youngest person to hold the office.
“Having a government minister who is openly gay was a welcome development, and it’s a really positive sign of how attitudes have changed that a gay man is now in the running for Taoiseach,” said Paula Fagan, national coordinator for Ireland’s LGBT Helpline, a group that provides support to the country's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.
If elected, Varadkar would only be the fourth openly gay world leader in modern history. The others include Luxembourg Prime Minister Xavier Bettel, former Belgian Prime Minister Elio Di Rupo and former Icelandic Prime Minister Jóhanna Sigurõardóttir.
A picture of political spouses taken earlier this week -- including Bettel’s partner, Gauthier Destenay, as the only male -- recently went viral.
Two years ago, Ireland legalized same-sex marriage when 62 percent of voters in a nationwide referendum cast their ballots in favor of defining marriage as a legal union between two people, regardless of gender. Ireland became the first country in the world to approve same-sex marriage by popular vote.
“During the referendum campaign, Minister Leo Varadkar gave a groundbreaking interview on national radio, in which he publicly came out as a gay man,” Fagan said. “As such, he is the first openly gay government minister in Ireland, and he has demonstrated courage in speaking publicly about his sexuality and about public attitudes to the LGBT community.”
In a speech to Parliament to convince undecided colleagues to vote "yes" in the 2015 referendum, Varadkar stressed, “This is not a bill about ‘gay marriage,’ it is about ‘equal marriage.’”
"Having an openly gay member of parliament reach the office of Taoiseach not only shows how far Ireland has come in such a short period of time on LGBT+ understanding and acceptance but also sends out an important message to young LGBT+ Irish people that your sexuality, gender or any aspect of your identity should not be a preventative factor in achieving your aspirations and dreams in life -- be that politics, business, the arts or any other aspect of Irish society,” Adam Shanley, director of Gay Switchboard Ireland, told NBC Out.
Follow NIreland appears set to elect its first openly gay prime minister (or Taoiseach) on June 2. Leo Varadkar has built a wide lead in the race to succeed Enda Kenny, who announced his departure after serving as the country's premier for more than six years.
Varadkar is currently the Minister for Social Protection and is the favorite to replace Kenny as both the Fine Gael party leader and the head of government. If elected, he would also become the country's first leader of Asian immigrant descent and, at 38, the youngest person to hold the office.
“Having a government minister who is openly gay was a welcome development, and it’s a really positive sign of how attitudes have changed that a gay man is now in the running for Taoiseach,” said Paula Fagan, national coordinator for Ireland’s LGBT Helpline, a group that provides support to the country's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.
If elected, Varadkar would only be the fourth openly gay world leader in modern history. The others include Luxembourg Prime Minister Xavier Bettel, former Belgian Prime Minister Elio Di Rupo and former Icelandic Prime Minister Jóhanna Sigurõardóttir.
A picture of political spouses taken earlier this week -- including Bettel’s partner, Gauthier Destenay, as the only male -- recently went viral.
Two years ago, Ireland legalized same-sex marriage when 62 percent of voters in a nationwide referendum cast their ballots in favor of defining marriage as a legal union between two people, regardless of gender. Ireland became the first country in the world to approve same-sex marriage by popular vote.
“During the referendum campaign, Minister Leo Varadkar gave a groundbreaking interview on national radio, in which he publicly came out as a gay man,” Fagan said. “As such, he is the first openly gay government minister in Ireland, and he has demonstrated courage in speaking publicly about his sexuality and about public attitudes to the LGBT community.”
In a speech to Parliament to convince undecided colleagues to vote "yes" in the 2015 referendum, Varadkar stressed, “This is not a bill about ‘gay marriage,’ it is about ‘equal marriage.’”
"Having an openly gay member of parliament reach the office of Taoiseach not only shows how far Ireland has come in such a short period of time on LGBT+ understanding and acceptance but also sends out an important message to young LGBT+ Irish people that your sexuality, gender or any aspect of your identity should not be a preventative factor in achieving your aspirations and dreams in life -- be that politics, business, the arts or any other aspect of Irish society,” Adam Shanley, director of Gay Switchboard Ireland, told NBC Out.
Follow NBC Out on Twitter, Facebook and InstagramBC Out on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram

December 13, 2016

Increased Anxiety on Younger LGBT Since Trump’s Election






Giovanni Guerrero says he has been "staying in more and more lately."
The third-year aerospace engineering student at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo is both a member of the LGBT community and Mexican-American, and he feels especially vulnerable after a highly divisive election campaign that was accompanied by a rise in various types of hate crimes.
"I mean, [living] in California is a lot safer and I'm grateful for that … [but] anti-LGBT people are very pumped now," he said.
Guerrero's anxiety is shared by many lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Americans, as evidenced by the Trevor Project, a nonprofit group that works to prevent suicides among LGBT youth. The project's national suicide hotline for LGBT youth received more than twice its normal call volume in the two days after the presidential election.
Trevor Project spokesman Steve Mendelsohn told VOA the crisis center received an average of 150 to 175 calls, texts or online messages a day last December. In the week following the November election this year, the number of contacts was up to 230 a day.
"There's a lot of fear out there … [and] the anxiety was heightened after the election. … They're worried they will lose their rights," Mendelsohn said.
Mendelsohn said people who contacted the hotline disclosed anxiety about their personal safety as well as fears they would be forced into conversion therapy or that laws establishing marriage equality would be reversed after Donald Trump assumes the presidency in January.
A person holds up a "Gays for Trump" sign as then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump holds a campaign event in Orlando, Fla., Nov. 2, 2016.
A person holds up a "Gays for Trump" sign as then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump holds a campaign event in Orlando, Fla., Nov. 2, 2016.
Trump's LGBT position
During his campaign, Trump vowed to appoint justices to the Supreme Court who would reverse a ruling making same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states, though he later said the current law was "settled" and he was comfortable with it. Vice President-elect Mike Pence has long been suspected by the LGBT community of supporting conversion therapy, the practice of trying to change someone's sexual orientation. In a recent New York Times interview, Pence's spokesman denied this.
The former Indiana governor supported the state's religious freedom law in 2015, which lets people and companies assert that their exercise of religion has been or is likely to be substantially burdened as a defense in legal proceedings. Critics say this permits discrimination against the LGBT community.
Gregory Angelo, president of Log Cabin Republicans — a leading group of conservatives fighting for LGBT inclusion in the Republican Party — said a lot of the fear people are experiencing stems from myths that were perpetuated by Democrats during the campaign. He said Trump was the "most pro-LGBT" Republican nominee ever.
Trump, he said, is "someone who has reached out directly to the LGBT community during his campaign and who said, and I quote, 'I will be a real friend to the LGBT community.' "
But to Guerrero, the current environment favors those who have a "dark" attitude, exemplified by a man who yelled "faggot" recently at some of his friends who were holding hands.
"It's obvious that a lot of people are more comfortable in showing their opinions, which come off as racist and homophobic," he said.
Heightened anxiety
In an online survey of primary and secondary school educators across the country, the Southern Poverty Law Center's Teaching Tolerance project contacted more than 10,000 teachers, counselors, administrators and others working with youth in schools.
Ninety percent reported that the climate in their schools had been negatively affected since the election, and most of them said they thought the impact would be long-lasting.
"There's certainly a lot of anti-LGBT harassment reported," said Maureen Costello, director of Teaching Tolerance and the study's author.
Eight in 10 educators reported heightened anxiety on the part of marginalized students, including LGBT students, immigrants, Muslims and African-Americans.
"LGBT kids, immigrants or kids perceived as immigrants are very anxious about the future and they have now suffered this harassment, and that doesn't go away," Costello said.
Then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump holds up a rainbow flag with "LGBTs for TRUMP" written on it at a campaign rally in Greeley, Colo., Oct. 30, 2016.
Then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump holds up a rainbow flag with "LGBTs for TRUMP" written on it at a campaign rally in Greeley, Colo., Oct. 30, 2016.
Angelo said he would not discredit anyone's personal experience, but that he thought the anxiety about the LGBT community's future under Trump was ill-founded.
"This notion that conversion therapy is going to be forced upon LGBT Americans or whether marriage equality is going to go away are not statements that Mr. Trump made during the course of his campaign and certainly are not of any policy agenda for the Trump administration," he said.
In July, Angelo described himself as "mad as hell" at the Republican Party's platform, which was drawn up during the campaign. The platform opposed marriage equality and included language affirming conversion therapy, supporting adoption agencies that deny gay couples the right to adopt, and endorsing Pence's religious freedom bill. Angelo described it as the "most anti-LGBT platform in the party's history."
But now, he said he's keeping an open mind, giving Trump and Pence a chance to lead.
"[Trump] has already condemned anyone who is bullying or harassing other people and using his election as a justification," he said.
Meanwhile, Guerrero said anxiety and fear were taking him and his friends back in time.
“I don't want to feel that I have to get used to this type of life where I'm always hiding from my personal identity," Guerrero said.

October 11, 2016

Raining Men Politicly but Not to the Democrats Camp






Interactive- mover cursor over the graphs to get numbers. You will notice that as a voting block LGBTQ is voting united but when you break it down some are more united than others. Also there is nothing to suggest that the trend that you see as of 2012 has change in any major way.





September 5, 2016

NYT: There is a Big LGBT Political Sway Going On




On a sweltering afternoon in late August, Stephanie Murphy, a Democrat running for Congress against a longtime Republican incumbent, stole a half-hour from a crammed schedule for something that grieving residents of this metropolitan area still routinely do: She visited Pulse nightclub, where a gunman ended 49 lives in June.

The club itself has been closed since then, but a patch of the property in front brims with flowers, photographs and rainbow flags, which signal that Pulse was a place where many gay people gathered and many gay people died. It’s an eye-catching, heart-stopping memorial.

Could it also be an omen of political change?

Prominent among the issues that Murphy, 37, is campaigning on is her 73-year-old opponent’s dismal record on L.G.B.T. rights. And some Democrats are convinced that this could work powerfully in her favor, especially at this time, in this place. Her district includes much of Orlando, though not Pulse itself, and is home to victims’ relatives and friends.




Murphy was at Pulse on this day to show it to United States Representative Barbara Lee, a California Democrat who belongs to a quickly swelling army of party leaders who have traveled to Florida to stump for Murphy or help her raise money, reflecting the party’s identification of her contest as one that might flip a House seat from red to blue and help to erode the Republican majority.
Stephanie Murphy, candidate for Congress from Florida. Credit Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call, via Associated Press
“This is a very winnable race,” Lee told me as we approached Pulse, adding that what happened there — and its exposure of the hatred that L.G.B.T. Americans still confront — is part of the equation. “I think people will see that as a defining moment and say: ‘No more. My vote is going to be for human rights.’ ”

Across many decades and hundreds of campaigns at every level of government, L.G.B.T. rights have been a point of bitter debate, often benefiting Republican politicians in conservative areas where voters pushed back at social change. In recent years, though, Democrats have increasingly sought to turn their advocacy for L.G.B.T. people into an advantage.

Public opinion polls leave no doubt that a significant majority of Americans support laws protecting L.G.B.T. people from discrimination and approve of same-sex marriage. But that doesn’t mean that they prioritize the issue and punish politicians with contrary views. The results of many elections suggest that they don’t. 
I think that’s changing, and 2016 could be the proof of it. In several closely fought races around the country, candidates’ actions and comments regarding gay people have come to the fore and come to define them. Murphy’s contest against John Mica, now in his 12th term, is only one of them.

The outcomes of two of the most competitive gubernatorial contests — in Indiana and North Carolina — could be affected by voters’ feelings about how the candidates have handled L.G.B.T. rights. That’s especially true in North Carolina, where Gov. Pat McCrory is being hammered for a shockingly regressive measure that he signed into law last March.

It hallucinated some grave public danger in transgender people’s using public restrooms that correspond to their gender identity, banned them from doing so, and then went even further, nullifying local ordinances that outlawed employment and housing discrimination against gay and lesbian people.

“I believe that he started this in order to stir up his right wing and to win this election,” said his Democratic challenger, Roy Cooper, the state’s attorney general, when I spoke with him last week. “But it’s backfired on him because it’s backfired on the state.”

In protest of the law, PayPal nixed plans to build a major new operations center in Charlotte. The National Basketball Association relocated an all-star game from North Carolina to another state. Business groups moved conventions. Performers canceled concerts.

“It has cost us thousands of jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars,” Cooper told me. And it has tarnished McCrory’s carefully tended image as a common-sense, pro-business governor.

Cooper presses the issue all the time, including in a recent debate against McCrory. Polls in August showed him ahead by one to nine points.
Roy Cooper, North Carolina Democratic gubernatorial candidate. Credit Chuck Burton/Associated Press
“That really is a new day,” JoDee Winterhof, the senior vice president for policy and political affairs at the Human Rights Campaign, told me.

As more business leaders stand up for L.G.B.T. rights, which they deem important to assembling the best work force and burnishing their brands, more politicians find that their own positions can have a serious impact on their relationship with the corporate community. Being against L.G.B.T. rights can complicate any claims they make to being champions of economic growth. It can also depress financial contributions to their campaigns.

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Just look at the congressional race in northern New Jersey between Scott Garrett, the Republican incumbent, and Josh Gottheimer, a Democrat.

A little over a year ago, Politico revealed that Garrett was refusing to give what is generally a pro forma donation to the National Republican Congressional Committee because it backed openly gay candidates.

Although Garrett had always had close ties with Wall Street, several big financial institutions stopped donating to his campaign, and that could put Gottheimer, a fund-raising whirlwind, on a more equal footing with him than Democratic challengers in previous election cycles. Partly for that reason, political handicappers envision a potentially close contest between him and Garrett, who got at least 55 percent of the vote in 2010 and 2012.

Gottheimer said that news coverage of Garrett’s tussle with his fellow Republicans over gay candidates brought into the light a host of extremely conservative positions — on everything from equal pay and abortion rights to the Confederate flag and global warming — that many of his constituents weren’t wholly aware of.

It has also become a yardstick of Garrett’s humanity. That’s how I increasingly notice L.G.B.T. rights playing out among many voters in the center. It’s a marker. A metaphor.

It has power on its own, too. In a recent interview in Paramus, N.J., Gottheimer told me that when his campaign did a poll testing which of Garrett’s conservative positions bothered the largely suburban district’s voters the most, “This issue was above everything else.”

“I would have guessed that this would do well with more Democratic-leaning voters,” he said. But, he added, “The whole middle and middle-right were equally offended by this.”

Karen Gerbatsch, 64, a registered Republican who has voted repeatedly for Garrett, told me that when she heard about his disapproval of gay candidates, she thought, “That’s not me.”

“It bothered me a lot,” she added. She said that she’ll vote for Gottheimer, but cited additional reasons, chief among them her concern about the current crop of Washington Republicans amassing too much power, especially if Donald Trump happens to win the presidency.
Josh Gottheimer, candidate for Congress in New Jersey's 5th District. Credit Danielle Parhizkaran/The Record of Bergen County, via Associated Press
It’s impossible to isolate the impact of L.G.B.T. rights from other factors in these races. Gottheimer, who worked as a speechwriter for President Bill Clinton, is connected to an extensive network of powerful Democrats who have rallied to his cause, and he’s an astute, poised first-time candidate who, at 41, promises a freshness that Garrett, 57, cannot.

Murphy, another first-time candidate, is competing in a district that the Florida Supreme Court recently redrew so that it’s younger and more Democratic than it was in past elections. Odds makers still give Mica the advantage.

She has an inspiring family story: Her parents fled the Communists in Vietnam by boat when she was just 6 months old. After the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, she abandoned a lucrative consulting career in the private sector to work for the Department of Defense. She now teaches at Rollins College in Winter Park, which abuts Orlando. She has two young children. And she presents herself — eloquently — as an alternative to Congress’s entrenched ways.

When Trump visited Orlando last month to speak to a conference of leaders who adamantly oppose L.G.B.T. rights, she blasted her opponent, Mica, for having endorsed him and presented a litany of Mica’s anti-gay positions and remarks across the years.

Two weeks later, she was the first candidate to be endorsed by a new political action committee called the Pride Fund to End Gun Violence, which will raise money for politicians supportive of both L.G.B.T. rights and gun control.

Jason Lindsay, the founder and executive director of the Pride Fund, told me that in several visits to Orlando, he has been struck by “the sheer determination” of gays and lesbians there. “The Pulse attack was incredibly personal,” he said.

Murphy cited Pulse to me when she noted that Mica had opposed the inclusion of any reference to sexual orientation in federal hate-crimes legislation. “How can you have that position given what has happened?” she said.

“His positions,” she said, “have been extreme and exclusionary.”

At Pulse, I was struck by something that hadn’t been clear to me in news coverage right after the shooting. This gay nightclub shared its stretch of a prominent thoroughfare with a Dunkin’ Donuts, a Radio Shack and, directly across the street, a Wendy’s, with its logo of a pigtailed, red-haired, freckled girl.

It wasn’t off in the shadows but right in the mix — which is where L.G.B.T. people are today, and where L.G.B.T. rights are in the 2016 election.




June 28, 2016

Little Marco Could Make Hillary President {Up to Young Dem, Ind., LGBT}




                                                                       


Marco Rubio says he decided to run for re-election because it will be imperative to have people like him in the U.S. Senate if Hillary Clinton is elected president.

“There’s [a] role for the Senate that could end up being its most important in the years to come: the Constitutional power to act as a check and balance on the excesses of a president.”

But it is worth asking: Does Rubio’s decision to run make it more likely Clinton will become president?

It’s easy to envision a scenario in which it does. Eagerness to drive a political stake through Rubio’s heart could increase Democratic turnout in Florida, throwing the most important swing state — and therefore the election — to Clinton.

Think about it. Democrats hardly would be whipped into a frenzy by a desire to defeat, say, Carlos Lopez-Cantera. Most voters probably still are fuzzy at best on who, exactly, Lopez-Cantera is. But Rubio? He’s become a high-profile target.

The wish to stick it to Rubio also plausibly would be a better election-day mobilizer than any positive feeling toward either Rep. Patrick Murphy or Rep. Alan Grayson, who are battling it out to be the Democratic senatorial nominee.

Rubio’s insinuation that the Orlando massacre influenced his decision to seek re-election only heightens Democratic anger toward him. Before, the biggest knock on Rubio was that he was a slacker who couldn’t be bothered to show up to work in the Senate. Damaging, yes, but not something to make Democrats get out and vote.

Now, though, Rubio is the hypocrite who steadfastly has opposed LGBT equality and commonsense gun control yet has the gall to imply he’s running in response to the assault-weapon massacre perpetrated at a gay night club?

How epically self-serving.

Rubio’s anti-LGBT record is exactly the kind of issue that could motivate young Democrats and independents who otherwise might have stayed home to make the effort to vote. As a group, they might not even have been that enamored of Clinton. But if they take the trouble to vote against Rubio in remembrance of Orlando, they might just vote for Clinton while they’re at it.

For Clinton to win in November, she’ll need a big turnout of Democrats in the Orlando area — precisely the area that ought to be most offended by Rubio’s decision to use the Pulse horror as his excuse to run. Democratic turnout in South Florida also is a key, and that’s also an LGBT-friendly venue.

Plus, Rubio’s flip-flop on immigration is a double-whammy in those two regions. Not only does it anger Hispanics who feel he stabbed them in the back by abandoning immigration reform, it angers those who remember that gay Hispanics were targeted in the Pulse attack.

Current polls show Rubio beating either Murphy or Grayson. But if Democrats exploit Rubio’s Pulse hypocrisy with skill, Rubio might just help them beat Trump.

By Jac Wilder VerSteeg who is a columnist for the South Florida Sun Sentinel and former deputy editorial page editor for The Palm Beach Post.  

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