Showing posts with label Nature. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Nature. Show all posts

February 9, 2019

A Story For a Weekend As Cold Temperatures Buried Many Places in Snow Including the House Cat






There's a cat under all that ice. This is Fluffy, pre-thaw, on Jan. 31. (Courtesy of Animal Clinic of Kalispell)
There’s a saying in medicine: You’re not dead until you’re warm and dead. Turns out it applies to cats, too.
The polar vortex was raging in the Upper Midwest last week, and temperatures had dropped below zero on the morning of Jan. 31 in the city of Kalispell, Mont., near Glacier National Park. Fluffy — a northwest Montana native and usually confident outdoor cat — got into some trouble.
Fluffy’s owners, who did not want to be identified, found her covered in thick chunks of ice and snow near their home last week. They scooped her up and immediately drove her to the vet, which is probably what saved her life.
“She was frozen,” said Andrea Dutter, executive director of the Animal Clinic of Kalispell. It wasn’t a rock-solid kind of frozen. But her body temperature was below what the clinic’s thermometers could read — 90 degrees. A cat’s normal internal body temperature is 101 degrees.
“We immediately began to warm her up,” Dutter said. “Warm water, heating pads, hot towels . . . within an hour she started grumbling at us.”

Fluffy immediately after her thaw. (Courtesy of Animal Clinic of Kalispell)

Fluffy, fully reanimated. (Courtesy of Animal Clinic of Kalispell)
Fluffy is an indoor-outdoor cat who knows her surroundings well, Dutter said. Once she was thawed, the veterinarians discovered that the cat had suffered an injury that prevented her from getting back to the house, although by the time Fluffy reached the clinic, being frozen was her main problem.
Exactly one week later, Fluffy is warm and thriving, and she isn’t planning any more outdoor adventures.

Fluffy at home Thursday. (Courtesy of Animal Clinic of Kalispell)

June 13, 2018

Beneath The Forest. [by Video]













🦊ꃕ

April 9, 2018

Two Goats Up High Under a Bridge, Would They jump? Would Trump? [Your Monday Morning Story]




  wrote this piece and post it on NPR.org. It made me stop, look and think. How many things something makes us stop and think on any particular day? Particularly on a Monday morning? I hope this natural by chance pictures of the situation of two goats that is really between life or death. The goats on the first pictures are keeping their cool. One might say it was pretty stupid for the goats to be dimwitted to get into that situation. Have anybody ever said that about one of your (and mine)situations? It is not dimwitted of the goats to get into that situation and if you have ever own a goat you know goats live to explore and get into bad situations. To get a pair of goats like I did for pets just because I had space and time to take care of them was dimwitted and stupid of me. But like goats, we all love to explore and I learn mountains, not just about goat behavior but mine. In answer the tittle question of this feature story, Yes He would jump.....just watch him. Would the goats jump?
No one knows why the goats climbed up on the pedestal of a Mahoning River bridge and set out along a narrow beam.
They're not talking. But goats do love to climb and explore, notes goat specialist Susan Schoenian of the University of Maryland College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. So these two goats, who are probably pals (because goats are social animals), escaped from the nearby yard where they lived and went on an adventure.
They deftly walked along the beam with their very small feet. They proceeded about 200 feet. But it turns out they couldn't just keep on walking ahead — there was an obstacle that kept them from moving forward. So they had to turn around and head back the way they came. 
The brown goat managed the trick. "He walked out to a concrete pier and somehow got himself turned around," says Todd Tilson, operations manager in the maintenance department of the Pennsylvania Turnpike.
The white goat did not manage to turn around.
That's why, in the photo, you'll see the two goats facing each other.
Tilson reports that the brown goat "kept hitting the white one with its head" to make it walk backward. "It would take one step, two steps back, then stop," he says.
And really, can you blame it? Would you want to walk backward on a beam that is about 8 inches wide and 100 feet above the ground?
Yeah, me neither.

The goats weren't likely to leap off, conjectures Schoenian: "They're not going to jump. That's not part of their behavior to jump off of something. Their desire is to climb."
In their predicament, she sees similarities to human behavior: "Think of a child who climbs out there to explore and gets stuck and is too scared to go any further. And you just kind of shut down even if you could keep going."
The call about the stranded goats came into the Pennsylvania Turnpike at roughly 10 a.m. Tuesday. The son of the owner of the goats said they had been out there 18 hours already.
Clearly, a crane was needed. But the turnpike crane was in use, so the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation stepped in. Steve McCarthy, a civil engineer for bridge inspection with the department, was drafted for the rescue effort. "It was my first goat extraction," he says.
He and a colleague got in the bucket at the end of the long arm of the crane.
Pennsylvania Turnpike spokeswoman Rosanne Placey called the operation "Goat Watch" and remembers "dozens upon dozens" of status reports from turnpike maintenance folks coming in on her phone.
A happy ending wasn't guaranteed. "If they fall off the beam while we're trying to rescue them, it would feel like we did harm to them," Tilson says.
"The initial plan was to try and separate the goats so we could could grab the goat facing the wrong way and turn it around," McCarthy says. But the white goat wasn't cooperating.
"I said, 'I'm going for it,' " he recalls. "I grabbed the goat as tight as I could." And he lifted it into the bucket.
The white goat was deposited on the bridge and handed over to its owner's son. McCarthy then tapped the beam with a pole to encourage the brown goat to make its way back.
Asked about the possible cost of the rescue, Tilson says, "We didn't even calculate it. We were just trying to be a good neighbor and get the goats back safely."
McCarthy is a happy man. "In this day and age, when things can go terribly wrong," he says, "it was great to see things go right."
His success is a testimony to a value that is sometimes lost in our quick-attention-span age: persistence.
"There was no way," he says, "I was letting go of that goat."
Meanwhile, no word on how the goats are faring, but I'm sure they would agree with a classic proverb from Rabbi Nachman of Bratslav: "The whole world is a very narrow bridge; the important thing is not to be afraid."
[pics by npr.org]


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August 11, 2017

Uncle Fatty Released Back to The Jungle After Diet, No Tumor Just Fat


(There is a moral here for adults but also you might want to show uncle to your kids..adamfoxie*)


Uncle Fatty the fat monkey released into wild after dramatic weight loss
Poor Uncle Fatty was too fat (Picture: Viral Press)


Remember Uncle Fatty, the obese monkey who was sent to a weight loss boot camp?
Well, after putting in loads of hard work and sticking to an intensive diet and exercise regimen, Uncle is finally going to be released into the wild.

The chubby macaque used to lounge around the beach-side Bang Khun Thian district in Bangkok, where visitors would constantly give him fattening food.
Thai conservation officials got involved after photos of his humongous protruding belly were shared on social media.
They tracked him down and found him hanging out with tourists in the resort, gorging on the unhealthy food he was being given.

Uncle Fatty the fat monkey released into wild after dramatic weight loss
Uncle Fatty just couldn’t say no to food (Picture: Viral Press)

At the time he weighed a hefty 27kg – while a normal macaque should only weigh around eight to 10 kilograms.

After confirming that he didn’t have a tumor, officials immediately put Uncle Fatty into rehabilitation.
Uncle was put on a strict diet of healthy fruits and vegetables – a big dietary change from the jellies, sugary yogurt drinks, watermelons and fizzy drinks he was given by tourists.

And this is what he looks like now!


Uncle Fatty the fat monkey released into wild after dramatic weight loss
Uncle Fatty after his dramatic (er) transformation (Picture: Thai PBS)


Natanon Panpetch, a vet at the Wildlife Conservation Office, told local site Coconuts: ‘His tummy no longer drags on the ground. He is in perfect health and ready to be released. He has grown accustomed to the natural foods.’
Uncle now weighs 24.72kg – which is still big for a macaque, but it means that he’s lost around 8% of his body weight.

Officials are now discussing how they can stop people feeding the monkeys, who can easily find their own food in the mangrove.
‘A macaque is supposed to eat crabs or clams in the mangrove,’ Natanon added. ‘We do not recommend people feed the monkeys at all.
‘(Uncle Fatty) does not know what food he should not eat. He eats whatever he finds delicious.’


 METRO UK


March 21, 2017

Delays on Trump Administration Lands The Patched Bumble Bee on Endangered List







The immediate fate of the rusty patched bumble bee no longer hangs in the balance. 
The prodigious pollinator officially landed on America's endangered species list Tuesday, the Department of the Interior said — the first time in the history of the continental United States that a bee species is under federal protection. 

Image: This 2012 photo provided by The Xerces Society shows a rusty patched bumblebee in Minnesota.

This 2012 photo provided by The Xerces Society shows a rusty patched bumblebee in Minnesota. Sarina Jepsen / The Xerces Society via AP

The humble bee's new special status comes after the Trump administration delayed branding the insect as an endangered species last month — a move made under the outgoing Obama administration that had yet to go into effect. The new administration said it needed time to review a flurry of forthcoming regulatory changes. 
Environmental groups blasted the nearly six-week delay as unwise, but the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service denied it would have any lasting impact because the agency must still develop a recovery plan to bring this species back to a "healthy and secure condition." 
With the rusty patched bumble bee's inclusion as an endangered species — alongside the Florida panther, whooping crane and 700 other species — the federal government is now tasked with ensuring it flourishes. It is also a now federal crime to harm or kill the bees, which were once abundant along the East Coast and through South Dakota and parts of Canada, but has seen its numbers plummet by 87 percent in recent decades, according to experts. 
Rebecca Riley, senior attorney with the nonprofit Natural Resources Defense Council, said the Trump administration reversed course "just in the nick of time." 
“Federal protections may be the only thing standing between the bumble bee and extinction,” said Riley, whose environmental advocacy group filed a federal lawsuit against the government over the delay.

November 9, 2016

We Don’t Understand Human Intelligence Compared to Animals





The guests lining up outside a Brisbane gallery were not your typical culture vultures; in fact, until recently they’d never seen a painting in their life. But with just a little training, they developed their own artistic taste, showing a clear preference for Picasso’s crystalline constructions or Monet’s dreamy soft focus as they wandered lazily through the different rooms.
It’s little wonder that their talents created such a buzz, considering that they were working with a brain smaller than a pin head: these bona fide art critics were your common or garden honey bees, trained to find a syrupy surprise behind one or other of the artists' work.
(Credit: Getty Images)
 We have around 100 billion neurons, giving us a huge brain compared to our relatively puny bodies (Credit: Getty Images)
In fact, the ability to recognize artistic style was just the latest in a long list of achievements. Honey bees can count up to four, read complex signs, learn from observation and talk to each other in a secret code (the famous ‘waggle dance’). When foraging, they can weigh up the distance to different flowers, planning complex routes to collect the most nectar with the least effort. And within the hive, their individual responsibilities can include cleaning, undertaking (as they tend to the dead) and even air-conditioning, as they collect water to drop on the honey comb during hot weather.



The human brain has nearly 100,000 times as many neurons as the bee brain, yet the rudiments of many of our most valued behaviours can be seen in the teeming activity of the hive. So what’s the point of all that grey matter we hold in our skulls? And how does it set us apart from other animals? These are some of the questions that will be discussed at the BBC Future’s World-Changing Ideas Summit in Sydney on 15 November.
ARE BIG BRAINS A WASTE OF SPACE?
About one-fifth of all you eat is used to power the electrical chit-chat between your 100 billion little grey cells. If a big brain didn’t give us any advantage, that would be an enormous waste.
And there are some clear benefits. If nothing else, it makes us more efficient at what we do. If honey bees are searching a scene, for instance, they will consider each object one by one, whereas larger animals have the extra brainpower to process it all at once. We can multi-task, in other words.
A bigger brain also boosts the amount we can remember: a honey bee can grasp just a handful of associations between signs signaling the presence of food, before it starts getting confused, whereas even a pigeon can learn to recognise more than 1,800 pictures, and that’s nothing compared to human knowledge. For a comparison, consider that a memory champions can remember the sequence of Pi to literally thousands of decimal places.
OK, SO WE CAN REMEMBER A LOT. WHAT ELSE?
(Credit: Getty Images)
Magpies are known to be among some of the most cognitively advanced birds (Credit: Getty Images)
Darwin described these kinds of distinctions as “differences of degree, not kind” – a conclusion that some might find frustrating. If you look at human civilization and all we have achieved, surely we must have some particularly special ability that is completely lacking in all other animals?
Culture, technology, altruism and many other traits have all been touted as signs of human greatness – but the more you look, the narrower that list becomes.

Macaques, for instance, have long been known to pick up stones to crack nuts while New Caledonian crows can craft hooks from a broken stick to help them pick up food - both rudimentary forms of tool use. Even invertebrates are getting in on the act. Veined octopuses, for instance, appear to collect coconut shells, dragging them along the sea floor for later use as a shelter. 
A chimp in Zambia, meanwhile, has been caught wearing a fetching tuft of grass in her ear – apparently for no other reason than that she thought it looked nice. Soon, many of the other chimps in her group copied her fashion statement, a form of adornment that some researchers have interpreted as a form of cultural expression. 
Many creatures also seem to have an innate sense of fairness, and may even feel empathy for others – as our colleagues at BBC Earth recently explored – again suggesting a kind of rich emotional life that was once thought to be our specie's domain. Consider the case of a humpback whale, which was recently seen saving a seal’s life, protecting it from a killer whale attack – evidence that we are not the only animal to behave altruistically.
HOW ABOUT CONSCIOUS THOUGHT?
Perhaps the answer instead lies in a “sense of self”, a creature’s ability to recognise itself as an individual. This navel gazing would be a rudimentary
(Credit: Getty Images)
Elephants can recognise their own reflection (Credit: Getty Images)








 form of consciousness. Of all the different qualities that might make us unique, self-awareness is the toughest to measure with any certainty – but one common test involved daubing a spot of paint on the animal, and putting it in front of a mirror. If the animal notices the mark and tries to rub it off, we can assume that the animal recognises its reflection, suggesting it has formed some kind of concept about itself.
Humans don’t develop this capacity until they are around 18-months-old, but a handful of other animals appear to demonstrated this kind of awareness, including bonobos, chimps, orang-utans, gorillas, magpies, dolphins and orca whales.
 SO WE’RE NOTHING SPECIAL AFTER ALL?

Not so fast. A couple of mental capacities may be purely our own, and they are perhaps best understood by considering a family’s conversation around the dinner table.
The first astonishing fact is that we can speak at all, of course. No matter what you’ve been thinking and feeling throughout the day, you will be able to find words to express the experience and describe it to those around you. 
No other creature can communicate with such freedom. The honey bee’s waggle dance, for instance, can relay the location of a flower bed, and it can even warn the other bees about the presence of a dangerous insect, but it can’t express everything the bee has experienced: it is limited to a few facts about the immediate circumstances. Human language, in contrast, is open-ended. With infinite combinations of words to choose from, we can articulate our deepest feelings or lay down the rules of physics – and if we can’t quite find the right term, we can just invent a new one.
(Credit: Getty Images)
Bees may be stuck in the present, with no concept of future or past (Credit: Getty Images)
What’s even more remarkable though, is the fact that most of our conversation is not rooted in the present, but revolves around the past and the future, which brings us to one of the other traits that may define us. We’ve already explored how we may be able to recall more facts than most animals. This is ‘semantic’ memory. But as Thomas Suddendorf at the University of Queensland will point out at the World-Changing Ideas Summit, we also have ‘episodic’ recall – the ability to mentally relive past events, picturing them in multi-sensory detail. It’s the difference between knowing that Paris is the capital of France, and being able to bring back the sights and sounds of your first trip to the Louvre.

Crucially, the ability to think back to the past also allows us to imagine the future, too, as we use previous experiences to predict future scenarios. You might imagine your next holiday by recalling all your past trips, for instance, allowing you to picture what kind of hotel you like, plan the sights you want to visit and build a menu of food you want to eat.
No other animal appears to have such elaborate personal memories, combined with the ability to plan whole chains of actions in advance. Even bees, with their complicated housekeeping in the hive, are probably only responding to their present circumstances; their thoughts don’t go beyond the next flower they would like to visit or the danger of an intruder. They are not going to reminisce about what it felt like to be a larva. 
Together with language, mental ‘time travel’ allows us to share our experiences and our hopes with many other people, building networks of combined knowledge that are continually growing with each generation. Science, architecture, technology, writing – in short, everything that allows you to read this article – would be impossible without it.  
— http://www.bbc.com/
  • David Robson
David Robson is BBC Future’s feature writer. He is @d_a_robson on Twitter.

September 28, 2016

The Worse Killer in Nature Because It Kills It’s Own




Researchers compiled a list of more than 1,000 mammals based on how many deaths were caused by members of the same species.

The meerkat had the highest rate with 19.4 per cent of all deaths the result of an attack by another meerkat, the academics reported in the journal Nature.

The carnivore, which lives in mobs of up to 50 mostly in the Kalahari and Namib deserts in southern Africa, is known for infanticide in particular.

It was closely followed by Schmidt's guenon, a type of monkey, (18.2 per cent) and the red-fronted lemur (16.7 per cent). Some of their close relations also had similarly high figures.

Others in the top 10 include the New Zealand sea lion (15.3 per cent), long-tailed marmot (14.5 per cent), lion (13.3 per cent), banded mongoose (13 per cent), grey wolf (12.8 per cent) and Chacma baboon (12.3 per cent) with the diademed sifaka and long-tailed chinchilla tied in 10th place on 12 per cent. 
There were a number of unexpected findings. For example, the Dama gazelle is responsible for 11.8 per cent and the California ground squirrel accounts for 11.9 per cent of the respective species’ deaths – more than the jaguar (11.1 per cent) or cougar (11.7 per cent).

The lead author of the paper, Dr José María Gómez, of Granada University in Spain, told The Independent in an email: "It is surprising that a priori cute and pacific animals, like meerkats, marmots and ground squirrels, have high levels of mortality to conspecifics [members of the same species]."

The research was done to help scientists estimate the rate of intentional killing among humans when Homo sapiens first evolved and they put this at about two per cent. That was more than six times higher than the average among the 1,024 mammal species of just 0.3 per cent.
“Many primates exhibit high levels of intergroup aggression and infanticide,” the researchers wrote in Nature.

“Social carnivores sometimes kill members of other groups and commit infanticide when supplanting older members of the same group.  Even seemingly peaceful mammals such as hamsters and horses sometimes kill individuals of their own species.”

Primates seemed to have a greater tendency towards violence, something that was associated with living in social groups and maintaining a territory. Chimpanzees cause nearly 4.5 per cent of deaths of other chimps, while eastern gorillas account for five per cent of their species.

But other primates are extremely peaceful. The figure for the famously pacific bonobo was just 0.7 per cent but the western gorilla was even less likely to resort to deadly violence with a rate of just 0.14 per cent.

Indian rhinocerous (1.01 per cent), tigers (0.88 per cent), the African forest elephant (0.29 per cent) and vampire bats (0.1 per cent) also had low rates, at least relative to early humans.

Some animals did kill each other at all. Among more than 10,000 deaths of zebras, there was not a single example of a same-species killing. 

Thomson’s gazelle (zero out of 410,000 deaths), the margay, a cat native to South and Central America (zero out of 1000,000) and multiple species of bats (zero out of hundreds of thousands) also appeared not to kill each other.

September 3, 2016

Millions of Dead Bees in a Nuked Looking Area After Zika Spraying





On Sunday morning, the South Carolina honey bees began to die in massive numbers.
Death came suddenly to Dorchester County, S.C. Stressed insects tried to flee their nests, only to surrender in little clumps at hive entrances. The dead worker bees littering the farms suggested that colony collapse disorder was not the culprit — in that odd phenomenon, workers vanish as though raptured, leaving a living queen and young bees behind.
Instead, the dead heaps signaled the killer was less mysterious, but no less devastating. The pattern matched acute pesticide poisoning. By one estimate, at a single apiary — Flowertown Bee Farm and Supply, in Summerville — 46 hives died on the spot, totaling about 2.5 million bees.
Walking through the farm, one Summerville woman wrote on Facebook, was “like visiting a cemetery, pure sadness.” 
A Clemson University scientist collected soil samples from Flowertown on Tuesday, according to WCBD-TV, to further investigate the cause of death. But to the bee farmers, the reason is already clear. Their bees had been poisoned by Dorchester’s own insecticide efforts, casualties in the war on disease-carrying mosquitoes.
On Sunday morning, parts of Dorchester County were sprayed with Naled, a common insecticide that kills mosquitoes on contact. The United States began using Naled in 1959, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, which notes that the chemical dissipates so quickly it is not a hazard to people. That said, human exposure to Naled during spraying “should not occur.”
In parts of South Carolina, trucks trailing pesticide clouds are not an unusual sight, thanks to a mosquito-control program that also includes destroying larvae. Given the current concerns of West Nile virus and Zika — there are several dozen cases of travel-related Zika in South Carolina, though the state health department reports no one has yet acquired the disease from a local mosquito bite — Dorchester decided to try something different Sunday.

The Zika virus, explained

Play Video3:07
Everything you ever wanted to know about the Zika virus and its spread across North and South America. (Daron Taylor, Claritza Jimenez/The Washington Post)
It marked a departure from Dorchester County’s usual ground-based efforts. For the first time, an airplane dispensed Naled in a fine mist, raining insect death from above between 6:30 a.m. and 8:30 a.m. Sunday. The county says it provided plenty of warning, spreading word about the pesticide plane via a newspaper announcement Friday and a Facebook post Saturday. Local beekeepers felt differently. 
“Had I known, I would have been camping on the steps doing whatever I had to do screaming, ‘No you can’t do this,'” beekeeper Juanita Stanley said in an interview with Charleston’s WCSC-TV. Stanley told the Charleston Post and Courier that the bees are her income, but she is more devastated by the loss of the bees than her honey.
The county acknowledged the bee deaths Tuesday. “Dorchester County is aware that some beekeepers in the area that was sprayed on Sunday lost their beehives,” Jason Ward, county administrator, said in a news release. He added, according to the Charleston Post and Courier, “I am not pleased that so many bees were killed.”

Planes spray pesticides aimed at mosquitos carrying Zika in Florida

Play Video1:02
Officials in Miami are hoping pesticides sprayed from the skies will be enough to kill the mosquitoes carrying the Zika virus there. Florida health officials have identified 15 Zika cases spread by local mosquitoes. (Reuters)
Spraying Naled from the air is not unprecedented, particularly when covering areas that cannot be reached by truck. In a single year in Florida, more than 6 million acres were fumigated with the chemical, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The agency argued in January that the technique should be used to curb Zika in Puerto Rico. 
But the insect neurotoxin cannot discriminate between honey bees and bloodsuckers. A profile of the chemical in Cornell University’s pesticide database warned that “Naled is highly toxic to bees.”
Although the insecticide was known to kill bees, to South Carolina beekeepers spraying had not been as significant a concern as parasites, disease and other hive threats. As South Carolina Beekeepers Association President Larry Haigh told the Post and Courier in June 2015, many counties will spray at night, when honey bees do not forage for pollen. Plus, given sufficient warning, beekeepers will shield their hives and protect the bees’ food and water from contamination.
Sunday was different. Summerville resident Andrew Macke, who keeps bees as a hobby, wrote on Facebook that the hot weather left bees particularly exposed. Once temperatures exceed 90 degrees, bees may exit the nest to cool down in what is called a beard, clustering on the outside of the hive in a ball. Neither Macke nor Stanley had covered their hives.
And then came the plane. 
“They passed right over the trees three times,” Stanley said to ABC 4 News. After the plane left, the familiar buzzing stopped. The silence in its wake was like a morgue, she said.
As for the dead bees, as Stanley told the AP, her farm “looks like it’s been nuked.”
A Summerville resident started a Change.org petition calling for Dorchester County to halt aerial Naled spraying. It is unclear whether those who lost bees are pursuing other recourse. 
Update: Dorchester County administrator Jason Ward wrote to The Washington Post in a statement on Thursday, clarifying that the county sent out a press release at 9:15 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 26.
“The beekeepers that were on the county’s contact list that were in the zone to be sprayed were called with one exception. Mr. Scott Gaskins, who runs the Mosquito Control program, failed to call Mitch Yawn, Ms. Juanita Stanley’s business partner,” Ward said in the email.
“The second issue regarding beekeepers like Mr. Andrew Macke revolves around the fact that the county did not have these locations on its list. However, we have reached out to the Lowcountry Beekeepers Association and they provided us with the names and locations for other beekeepers in Dorchester County.” 
“They passed right over the trees three times,” Stanley said to ABC 4 News. After the plane left, the familiar buzzing stopped. The silence in its wake was like a morgue, she said.
As for the dead bees, as Stanley told the AP, her farm “looks like it’s been nuked.”
A Summerville resident started a Change.org petition calling for Dorchester County to halt aerial Naled spraying. It is unclear whether those who lost bees are pursuing other recourse.
Update: Dorchester County administrator Jason Ward wrote to The Washington Post in a statement on Thursday, clarifying that the county sent out a press release at 9:15 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 26.
“The beekeepers that were on the county’s contact list that were in the zone to be sprayed were called with one exception. Mr. Scott Gaskins, who runs the Mosquito Control program, failed to call Mitch Yawn, Ms. Juanita Stanley’s business partner,” Ward said in the email.
“The second issue regarding beekeepers like Mr. Andrew Macke revolves around the fact that the county did not have these locations on its list. However, we have reached out to the Lowcountry Beekeepers Association and they provided us with the names and locations for other beekeepers in Dorchester County.”

How the Zika virus affects an infant's brain

Play Video1:38
Doctors confirmed the link between the Zika virus and microcephaly in April. While the most visible sign of microcephaly is the small size of the head, its actually inside the brain where the most damage occurs.
 (Whitney Leaming, Julio Negron/The Washington Post) 

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