Showing posts with label Nature. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Nature. Show all posts

November 9, 2019

Her Name is Sandra and Its Been Rule She is Neither an Orangutan Nor Human




   
orangutan
 Orangutans share about 97 percent of their DNA with humans.ROMEO GACAD/GETTY



The Buenos Aires Zoo's head of biology, Adrian Sestelo, said in 2015 that he thought it inappropriate to compare the animal with a human.

"When you don't know the biology of a species, to unjustifiably claim it suffers abuse, is stressed or depressed, is to make one of man's most common mistakes, which is to humanize animal behaviour," Sestelo said.

Experts said the verdict would open the floodgates to thousands of similar cases but that doesn't appear to have happened.

Once the Buenos Aires Zoo closed in 2016, Sandra traveled to the United States, where she was quarantined for a month at the Sedgwick County Zoo in Kansas before moving to Florida.

Orangutans are part of the family Hominidae—or great apes—along with gorillas, chimpanzees and humans. Their name translates from Malay as "man of the forest."
Sandra, 33, was born in Germany and spent 25 years at the Buenos Aires Zoo before arriving at her new home on November 5.

Patti Ragan, director of the center in Wauchula, Florida, said Sandra is adjusting to the center, joining 21 orangutans and 31 chimpanzees who have been rescued or retired from circuses, stage shows and the exotic pet trade.

"She was shy when she first arrived, but once she saw the swings, toys, and grassy areas in her new home, she went out to explore," Ragan said.

Ragan also said Sandra met her caregivers and has adjusted well to the new climate, calling her "sweet and inquisitive."

"This is the first time in over a decade that Sandra has had the opportunity to meet other orangutans, and she will meet them when she chooses. It is a new freedom for her, and one we are grateful to provide," she said.

The Buenos Aires Zoo's head of biology, Adrian Sestelo, said in 2015 that he thought it inappropriate to compare the animal with a human.

"When you don't know the biology of a species, to unjustifiably claim it suffers abuse, is stressed or depressed, is to make one of man's most common mistakes, which is to humanize animal behaviour," Sestelo said.

Experts said the verdict would open the floodgates to thousands of similar cases but that doesn't appear to have happened.

Once the Buenos Aires Zoo closed in 2016, Sandra traveled to the United States, where she was quarantined for a month at the Sedgwick County Zoo in Kansas before moving to Florida.

Orangutans are part of the family Hominidae—or great apes—along with gorillas, chimpanzees and humans. Their name translates from Malay as "man of the forest."


August 24, 2019

For The First Time Giraffes Are Being Protected From Being Slaughtered




                       Image result for giraffes



Giraffes have been given protection against trade in their body parts for the first time as the countries that make up the regulator added them to an endangered animals list.
Delegates from countries around the world are currently attending the  Conference of the Parties to the UN Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) convention in Geneva, where they are voting on international wildlife trade law.
Previously, there was no international protection for giraffe body parts as they were not listed on a CITES appendix, which is the lists of animals one has to procure a license to trade.
The species is now listed on Appendix II, which means international trade in giraffe parts, such as hides, bones, and meat will be regulated.
Although it is not a ban, it will be much more difficult to trade in giraffe body parts.
Adam Peyman, the Humane Society International’s wildlife programs and operations manager, said: “Securing CITES Appendix II protection for the giraffe throws a vital lifeline to this majestic species, which has been going quietly extinct for years. "This listing could not come soon enough. CITES listing will ensure that giraffe parts in international trade were legally acquired and not detrimental to the survival of the species."
Defra minister Zac Goldsmith welcomed the news, tweeting: "Good news. Well done to the Defra team for making the case so forcefully."
A cross-party coalition of MPs wrote to Michael Gove earlier this year when he was the environment secretary, urging him to protect giraffes.
The MPs, including Mr Goldsmith, Simon Clarke, Alex Chalk and Richard Benyon, as well as Labour MP John Mann and independent MP Frank Field  urged: "Whilst there are several reasons for this huge decline in giraffe numbers, including habitat destruction and human-animal conflict, there are alarming reports of an increase in giraffe hunting trophies and products being sold and traded. Greater protection under CITES would regulate this trade and make sure that it does not threaten the worldwide population.
"We urge you to build on the UK’s record in helping to conserve elephants and rhinos, by taking a stand at the next CITES meeting in May and joining African nations in making sure that giraffes are better protected. This meeting needs to be a turning point in reversing the decline in giraffe numbers, and the UK is well placed to lead on this."

July 21, 2019

If Trump Does Not Care About Kids in Cages No AC, Water nor Toothbrushes Why Would He CareAbout Plastic Straws Killing Sea-Turtles?



                 Image result for straws killing sea turtles
GIMME MY PLastic Straws!! No Paper FTT (F*The Turtles)

President Trump appears to have identified his newest American enemy — paper straws. 
His reelection campaign is now selling reusable and recycled straws in their 2020 online store, and Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale blasted out the slurping non-soggy alternative in an email titled "Make Straws Great Again," a play on the president's famed slogan. 
"I'm so over paper straws, and I'm sure you are too. Much like most liberal ideas, paper straws don't work and they fall apart instantly. That's why we just launched our latest product - Official Trump Straws," Parscale wrote late Friday. "Now you can finally be free from liberal paper straws that fall apart within minutes and ruin your drink."
Journalist Yashar Ali appears to have been the first to notice the new merchandise in Trump's campaign store. A pack of 10, which are red and emblazoned with "TRUMP" in silver, is available for $15. However, they currently take almost two weeks for shipping. 
Parscale had registered his frustrations with the newest eco-friendly fad earlier this week on Twitter. 
And earlier on Friday, Trump himself weighed in on the issue during a gaggle with reporters, saying "I do think we have bigger problems than plastic straws, arguing that plates and wrappers are also made of plastic but aren't receiving as much attention or disdain. 


"Everybody focuses on the straws. There's a lot of other things to focus [on]," he said. 
Many environmental groups have been pushing for alternatives to plastic disposable straws, which gained traction in the wake of a video showing a sea turtle with a plastic straw stuck up its nose. However, the paper alternatives many restaurants have begun using often quickly become mushy and unusable as the liquid permeates them. There are other non-paper, non-plastic alternatives which are slowly gaining steam, including hay straws, bamboo straws, reusable metal straws, glass straws, or encouraging patrons not to use straws, as Starbucks has with new lids.  
This is hardly the first time Trump has tried transform such an issue into a partisan wedge and has especially taken glee time and time again in mocking environmental initiatives, such as the Green New Deal, or has cast doubt on the reality of climate change. And it could also be his way of trying to distract from yet another rough week politically in the wake of his racist attacks on four Democratic freshmen congresswomen of color. 
The scourge of paper straws, however, isn't just a conservative issue, as Trump's campaign wants to frame it. Earlier this week, Sacha Haworth of the liberal opposition research group American Bridge tweeted her own frustrations with paper straws. 
(Full disclosure: This journalist, and many others, have also often tweeted about paper straw grievances). 
This also isn't the first time that efforts to make disposable dinnerware greener have been used as a political cudgel. After Democrats flipped the House in 2006, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi pushed to phase out styrofoam in the Capitol cafeterias, bringing in "corn-based, compostable dishes and utensils," according to The Hill. But when Republicans won back the House in 2010, they brought back the non-recyclable styrofoam.

February 9, 2019

A Story For a Weekend As Cold Temperatures Buried Many Places in Snow Including the House Cat






There's a cat under all that ice. This is Fluffy, pre-thaw, on Jan. 31. (Courtesy of Animal Clinic of Kalispell)
There’s a saying in medicine: You’re not dead until you’re warm and dead. Turns out it applies to cats, too.
The polar vortex was raging in the Upper Midwest last week, and temperatures had dropped below zero on the morning of Jan. 31 in the city of Kalispell, Mont., near Glacier National Park. Fluffy — a northwest Montana native and usually confident outdoor cat — got into some trouble.
Fluffy’s owners, who did not want to be identified, found her covered in thick chunks of ice and snow near their home last week. They scooped her up and immediately drove her to the vet, which is probably what saved her life.
“She was frozen,” said Andrea Dutter, executive director of the Animal Clinic of Kalispell. It wasn’t a rock-solid kind of frozen. But her body temperature was below what the clinic’s thermometers could read — 90 degrees. A cat’s normal internal body temperature is 101 degrees.
“We immediately began to warm her up,” Dutter said. “Warm water, heating pads, hot towels . . . within an hour she started grumbling at us.”

Fluffy immediately after her thaw. (Courtesy of Animal Clinic of Kalispell)

Fluffy, fully reanimated. (Courtesy of Animal Clinic of Kalispell)
Fluffy is an indoor-outdoor cat who knows her surroundings well, Dutter said. Once she was thawed, the veterinarians discovered that the cat had suffered an injury that prevented her from getting back to the house, although by the time Fluffy reached the clinic, being frozen was her main problem.
Exactly one week later, Fluffy is warm and thriving, and she isn’t planning any more outdoor adventures.

Fluffy at home Thursday. (Courtesy of Animal Clinic of Kalispell)

June 13, 2018

Beneath The Forest. [by Video]













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April 9, 2018

Two Goats Up High Under a Bridge, Would They jump? Would Trump? [Your Monday Morning Story]




  wrote this piece and post it on NPR.org. It made me stop, look and think. How many things something makes us stop and think on any particular day? Particularly on a Monday morning? I hope this natural by chance pictures of the situation of two goats that is really between life or death. The goats on the first pictures are keeping their cool. One might say it was pretty stupid for the goats to be dimwitted to get into that situation. Have anybody ever said that about one of your (and mine)situations? It is not dimwitted of the goats to get into that situation and if you have ever own a goat you know goats live to explore and get into bad situations. To get a pair of goats like I did for pets just because I had space and time to take care of them was dimwitted and stupid of me. But like goats, we all love to explore and I learn mountains, not just about goat behavior but mine. In answer the tittle question of this feature story, Yes He would jump.....just watch him. Would the goats jump?
No one knows why the goats climbed up on the pedestal of a Mahoning River bridge and set out along a narrow beam.
They're not talking. But goats do love to climb and explore, notes goat specialist Susan Schoenian of the University of Maryland College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. So these two goats, who are probably pals (because goats are social animals), escaped from the nearby yard where they lived and went on an adventure.
They deftly walked along the beam with their very small feet. They proceeded about 200 feet. But it turns out they couldn't just keep on walking ahead — there was an obstacle that kept them from moving forward. So they had to turn around and head back the way they came. 
The brown goat managed the trick. "He walked out to a concrete pier and somehow got himself turned around," says Todd Tilson, operations manager in the maintenance department of the Pennsylvania Turnpike.
The white goat did not manage to turn around.
That's why, in the photo, you'll see the two goats facing each other.
Tilson reports that the brown goat "kept hitting the white one with its head" to make it walk backward. "It would take one step, two steps back, then stop," he says.
And really, can you blame it? Would you want to walk backward on a beam that is about 8 inches wide and 100 feet above the ground?
Yeah, me neither.

The goats weren't likely to leap off, conjectures Schoenian: "They're not going to jump. That's not part of their behavior to jump off of something. Their desire is to climb."
In their predicament, she sees similarities to human behavior: "Think of a child who climbs out there to explore and gets stuck and is too scared to go any further. And you just kind of shut down even if you could keep going."
The call about the stranded goats came into the Pennsylvania Turnpike at roughly 10 a.m. Tuesday. The son of the owner of the goats said they had been out there 18 hours already.
Clearly, a crane was needed. But the turnpike crane was in use, so the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation stepped in. Steve McCarthy, a civil engineer for bridge inspection with the department, was drafted for the rescue effort. "It was my first goat extraction," he says.
He and a colleague got in the bucket at the end of the long arm of the crane.
Pennsylvania Turnpike spokeswoman Rosanne Placey called the operation "Goat Watch" and remembers "dozens upon dozens" of status reports from turnpike maintenance folks coming in on her phone.
A happy ending wasn't guaranteed. "If they fall off the beam while we're trying to rescue them, it would feel like we did harm to them," Tilson says.
"The initial plan was to try and separate the goats so we could could grab the goat facing the wrong way and turn it around," McCarthy says. But the white goat wasn't cooperating.
"I said, 'I'm going for it,' " he recalls. "I grabbed the goat as tight as I could." And he lifted it into the bucket.
The white goat was deposited on the bridge and handed over to its owner's son. McCarthy then tapped the beam with a pole to encourage the brown goat to make its way back.
Asked about the possible cost of the rescue, Tilson says, "We didn't even calculate it. We were just trying to be a good neighbor and get the goats back safely."
McCarthy is a happy man. "In this day and age, when things can go terribly wrong," he says, "it was great to see things go right."
His success is a testimony to a value that is sometimes lost in our quick-attention-span age: persistence.
"There was no way," he says, "I was letting go of that goat."
Meanwhile, no word on how the goats are faring, but I'm sure they would agree with a classic proverb from Rabbi Nachman of Bratslav: "The whole world is a very narrow bridge; the important thing is not to be afraid."
[pics by npr.org]


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