Showing posts with label Conservative. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Conservative. Show all posts

April 11, 2018

Sinclair TV Host is Fired After Tweeting to Violently Do Harm to David Hogg






Jamie Allman, who hosted a nightly show at a Sinclair-owned ABC affiliate in St. Louis, had tweeted that he was "getting ready to ram a hot poker up David Hogg's ass," sparking widespread outrage and an advertiser boycott.
When you say Sinclair TV Networks you can substitute Sinclair for Fox. They serve the news as they want it to be not as it happens but there is a limit when one of their people is talking about violence act about someone they don't like or agree with. These talking head went too far but losing his job is what he should get but also an arrest warrant should also go as a prescription for his foot in mouth disease.🦊
A conservative commentator in St. Louis has resigned and his show with a Sinclair-owned ABC affiliate was canceled amid widespread outrage over a violent, vulgar tweet he sent about Florida school shooting survivor David Hogg.
Last month, Jamie Allman, who hosted a nightly news show called The Allman Report on KDNL, as well as a morning radio talk show, tweeted, "When we kick their ass they all like to claim we're drunk. I've been hanging out getting ready to ram a hot poker up David Hogg's ass tomorrow. Busy working. Preparing."

Although Allman tweeted the crude remark on March 26 and later deleted it before making his account private, screenshots recently spread across Twitter, sparking a backlash online and prompting several companies to pull advertisements from his show.
On Monday night, Sinclair Broadcast Group, which owns the St. Louis ABC station, confirmed that Allman had resigned and that his program had been terminated.
"Yes, his show is canceled and he is off the air immediately," Ronn Torossian, a PR representative for Sinclair, told BuzzFeed News.
Allman is the latest example of the growing feud between conservative personalities and teen activists that has spread across cable news and social media platforms since Valentine's Day school massacre in Parkland, Florida, launched a national, student-led movement for gun control.
His tweet came just two days before Fox News commentator Laura Ingraham mocked Hoggfor not getting into college, igniting a similar media firestorm and advertiser boycott.
Ingraham later apologized after dozens of advertisers ditched her and she subsequently took a week-long break from her show. She returned to the air Monday night and spent much of her show attacking "the bullies on the left aiming to silence conservatives."
She did not directly address the controversy over her remarks about Hogg, and did not repeat her tweeted apology.
Though Allman had criticized Hogg before, his violent tweet caught the attention of Missouri Democratic state Rep. Stacey Newman, who called on advertisers to boycott Allman's show. The Riverfront Times, which first drew attention to the tweet, reported that Allman had previously accused the teenage gun control activist of not being a "grown-up" when it came to handling criticism.
As his tweet gained national attention, several companies, including Ruth’s Chris Steak House, announced that they would pull their ads from his show.
Allman has not yet publicly addressed the backlash to his tweet. As of Monday night, it was not clear whether he would continue to host his radio show. Jeff Allen, the program director for FM NewsTalk 97.1, did not respond to request for comment.
Sinclair, a sprawling, conservative media conglomerate, owns and operates about 200 TV stations across the US — the largest in the country — and is trying to take over more markets.
The company recently came under fire for forcing its news anchors to read promos about "one-sided news stories plaguing our country."
Sinclair's ongoing attempt to purchase the Tribune Media Company has also come under intense scrutiny because the deal would, critics argue, enable the broadcaster to influence dozens more local news stations with conservative-leaning coverage. The deal still requires the approval of federal regulators.
Buzzfeed
Brianna Sacks
Brianna Sacks

Time:
A conservative commentator for a St. Louis television station owned by the Sinclair Broadcast Group has resigned after backlash over a tweet in which he threatened to violently assault 17-year-old Parkland shooting survivor and gun control advocate David Hogg.
Jamie Allman, who hosted a nightly show on Sinclair’s ABC-affiliate station KDNL, tweeted on March 26 that he was “preparing” to assault Hogg with “a hot poker,” the Washington Post reports. Allman also hosts a conservative talk radio show.
“We have accepted Mr. Allman’s resignation, and his show has been canceled,” Ronn Torossian, a PR representative acting as Sinclair’s spokesperson, told the Post.
The since-deleted tweet rapidly drew criticism, prompting several advertisers to withdraw their support for the show, The Allman Report.

It is adamfoxie's 10th🦊Anniversay. 10 years witnessing the world and bringing you a pieace whcih is ussually not getting its due coverage. 4.9 Million Reads



June 6, 2017

How The Alt. Right is Using Sex, Campiness to Attract Gays to Fascism








At the National Policy Institute’s 2015 conference, alt-right star Richard Spencer's annual Nazi-fest, a speaker named Jack Donovan exhorted the crowd "to leave the world the way you entered it, kicking and screaming and covered in somebody else's blood." The same year, in the pages of the The Occidental Observer, one of the most prominent white nationalist webzines, another alt-righter, James J. O'Meara, held forth about how "behind the Negro, hidden away, as always, is the darker, more sinister figure of the Judeo. The Negro is the shock troop. The Jew is the ultimate beneficiary.” Aside from being open fascists and “white racialists,” Donovan and O’Meara have another thing in common: They’re both out gay men.
In his book The Homo and the Negro, O'Meara says that gay white men represent the best of what Western culture has to offer because of their "intelligence" and "beauty," and that "Negroes" represent the worst, being incapable of "achievement." Donovan calls women "whores" and "bitches," and, when a questioner on Reddit asked him his views of the Holocaust, responded, "What is this Holocaust thing? I'm drawing a blank."                                                    



Both have become influential figures in the alt-right; horribly, they are not the only gay men to respond to an olive branch lately offered by white nationalism. The opening of this movement to cisgender gay men is a radical change, "one of the biggest changes I've seen on the right in 40 years," says Chip Berlet, co-author of Right-Wing Populism in America. In the United States, unlike in Europe, out gay men have never been welcome in white supremacist groups. The Klan and neo-Nazi groups, the main previous incarnations of white hate in this country, were and still are violently anti-queer. And while a subset of openly gay men has always been conservative (or, as in all populations, casually racist), they never sought to join the racist right.
That was before groups like NPI, Counter-Currents Publishing, and American Renaissance started putting out the welcome mat. Since around 2010, some (though by no means all) groups in the leadership of the white nationalist movement have been inviting out cis gay men to speak at their conferences, write for their magazines, and be interviewed in their journals. Donovan and O'Meara, far to the right of disgraced provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos, are the white nationalist movement's actual queer stars. But there are others in the ranks, like Douglas Pearce of the popular neofolk band Death in June. And there are many more gay men (and some trans women) who have been profoundly influenced by two white nationalist ideas: the "threat" posed by Islam and the "danger" posed by immigrants.
Donovan tries to sugarcoat his own racist beliefs when speaking to his main fan base, gay men who like his macho looks and straight men from the "pickup artist" culture and the manosphere who are desperately trying to learn from him how to be manly. Instead, reverting to the other half of the Nazi playbook, he prefers to highlight his hatred for "effeminacy," feminism, and "weakness." A beautifully muscular man of 42 who has perfected a masculine scowl in the many photographs of himself he releases on his website and Facebook page, he functions as beefcake for the neofascist cause. He’s parlayed his butch allure into a brand, earning money from a line of T-shirts and wrist guards that say things like BARBARIAN and a series of books that seek to instruct both straight and gay men in how to become more masculine and in particular, more "violent." 
One of my Facebook friends, a politically liberal gay man I'll call Frank, is a fan of Donovan's Facebook page "because of the visuals. I like his looks—I mean, he's bald with tattoos. He really exudes a lot of sex." Frank also likes that Donovan "trashes that whole gay club scene," which Frank finds conformist and alienating.
But when Donovan says violence, he means violence. This is not BDSM. "The ability to use violence effectively is the highest value of masters," Donovan said in a 2017 speech at a fascist think tank in Germany. "It is the primary value of those who create order, who create worlds. Violence is a golden value. Violence rules. Violence is not evil–it is elemental." Though Donovan tries to mine the latent sexiness in violence for all it’s worth, he is, in fact, against consensual BDSM, condemning it in a 2010 essay as part of a long list of evils that he feels has been perpetuated by gay culture: the "extreme promiscuity, sadomasochism, transvestism, transsexuality, and flamboyant effeminacy" promoted by "the pink-haired, punk rock stepchildren of feminism," gay activists. No, it's straight-up people hurting and killing other people he's endorsing.
And what is all this violence for? Creating small, decentralized "homelands" in this country separated by—surprise!—race. He enthusiastically embraces an idea the alt-right calls "pan-secessionism," under which, as Donovan says in his book A Sky Without Eagles, "gangs" of white men would form "autonomous zones" for themselves and white women, where women "would not be permitted to rule or take part in … political life." The gangs would enforce racial boundary lines, because, as Donovan puts it, whites have "radically different values [and] cultures" than other people, and "loyalty requires preference. It requires discrimination.
In a 2011 essay, “Mighty White,” Donovan says, “race is not my favorite issue to write about”  because “I know too well that it distracts people from the bulk of my work" on the sexiness of violent masculinity. (If people associated him more with white nationalism than machismo, it could impede sales of his clothing line, books, patches, and the tattoos he sells out of a Portland-area gym.) And indeed, at the end of May, Donovan wrote a long, rambling post on his website trying to dissociate himself from white nationalism. The post may have been a response to the enormous public anger in Portland, Oregon (where Donovan lives), following white nationalist Jeremy Christian's murder of two men for defending women of color on a commuter train on May 26. In the essay, Donovan claimed he doesn't want to organize anyone politically, rather "I just want to hang out in the woods with … the people who I am oathed to, my tribe, the Wolves of Vinland"—a white, "neopagan" quasi-military brotherhood recognized as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center. (Wolves of Vinland member Maurice Michaely recently spent two years in prison for burning down a black church in Virginia.)
But Donovan’s recent hand-wringing does not erase the fact that on his website he’s repeatedly said real men want to "control our borders," decried the “black-on-white crime rate,” denounced “the deeply entrenched anti-white bias” of our culture, and said, "I support White Nationalists," who "I call … 'The Mighty Whites.' " Recently, he admiringly interviewed the two young men who lead Germany's anti-African, anti-Arab identitarian movement. On his podcast, the men, one of whom used to belong to a neo-Nazi group in Austria, boast about attacking a mosque and disrupting refugee theater. He also has begun whispering praise for Julius Evola, the Italian anti-Semite and fascist who joined Hitler's SS.
If Donovan is a caricature of the gay Nazi strongman—almost a personification of the phrase "body fascism" (which was originally used by gay men to critique other gay men's obsession with perfect gym bodies)—his counterpart, James O'Meara, is an embodiment of something that could barely be imagined until now: Nazi camp. I hesitate to write that phrase, because it's almost painful to acknowledge that camp—that subversive, gay "turning" of seriousness into playfulness and straight narratives into gay ones—could be deployed by a Nazi. But of course it can: If the emergence of out gay white nationalists shows anything, it's that LGBTQ people truly are everywhere, for good and for ill. And that we no longer have the luxury of assuming that queer tropes are inherently, and trans-historically, progressive.



Far femmier than Donovan in both looks and tone, O'Meara writes alternately smirking and playful essays for Counter-Currents about men's clothing, the closeted Cardinal Spellman, the "homoromanticism" of the Boy Scouts, and the political economy of The Gilmore Girls. O'Meara openly loves Hitler, but he also grooves to the socialist Oscar Wilde, andin an interview with the webzine Alternative Right, admiringly quotes "Bunny" Roger, the gay British dandy and World War II heroas saying: "Now that I've killed so many Nazis Daddy will haveto buy me a sable coat." But his "fun" paragraphs always end up at the same un-playful conclusion: "the Judaic is always there, blocking the way" and spreading "rot" throughout American culture. "The Jew" is deliberately destroying the country by building up "Negroes" and promoting "the alien, dissolute, demonic culture of the Africans." In a podcast, O'Meara said, "The blacks get their chicks pregnant as soon as they turn 15, and have 30 different children with 10 different women" because of Jewish scheming: "the poison that the Jewish mentality introduces" promotes heterosexual sex and "girl-craziness" instead of the glorious gayness that would dominate "if the Jews hadn't taken over Hollywood."
Of course, neither O’Meara nor Donovan actually support gay rights. This is partly because they don't believe in "civil rights." Although O'Meara wants to be part of an imagined elite band of men who love each other and rule society—his version of an Aryan fantasy called the Männerbund—he doesn't want to support, as he put it in the interview with Alternative Right, "some sniveling queen demanding 'my rights!' … 'The plight of the homosexual' … is a Leftist myth." Donovan says explicitly that straight people should be given more power and privileges than gay folks, because their "reproductive sexuality" is superior to ours. Both men openly detest lesbians and trans and genderqueer people: Donovan calls the trans movement "men who want to cut their dicks off and women who want to cut their tits off." And of course, no white nationalist organization anywhere supports LGBTQ rights on a social or legislative level. Their new "support" is limited to allowing cis gay men who are white racists to join them.



So why are white nationalists smiling in our direction? Most importantly, because it worked in Europe. In Holland, France, Germany, and Sweden, white nationalists have deliberately used LGBTQ people and Muslims as a wedge against one another. Polls show that over one third of French gay men supported Le Pen in the recent election despite her promise to end same-sex marriage, and in Germany, the far-right AfD recently tapped an out lesbian banker to run for chancellor. (The AfD is even more hostile to actual pro-gay policies than France's National Front is.) Sweden's fascist party organized an LGBTQ pride parade through Muslim neighborhoods, and of course, in Holland, Pim Fortuyn and later Geert Wilders tried to make "Islam" synonymous with "hatred of gays." Their ultimate goal was to make hatred of immigrants "progressive."
Bringing queer people in, in both Europe and America, is a way to grow the neo-fascist movement. It is also a way to court millennials, who are consistently supportive of gay rights even when they swing conservative on other issues. It's a testament to the fact that, in some ways, the queer movement has already won the battle for public opinion. The far right could not beat us, so they decided to join us—in the most superficial way possible. Ultimately, it's a form of pinkwashing, which YourDictionary defines as “the practice of representing something … as gay-friendly in order to soften or downplay aspects of its reputation considered negative.” How could Le Pen, or Wilders, or other open racists be so bad when they like queer people?
There is another potential benefit: If white supremacists can equate "Muslims" with attacks on LGBTQ people—and women—they might be able to attract liberals and moderates into a kind of anti-immigrant "big tent." This would complement their effort to portray racism as “pro-worker.” It’s hardly incidental that both Donovan and O’Meara see themselves as anti-capitalist. Like the many gay men who joined Hitler’s SA (the unit led by the out Ernst Röhm), they see a Nazi-like movement as somehow offering salvation from both antigay and economic oppression. (Of course, Hitler ultimately slaughtered Röhm and other SA gay men in the Night of the Long Knives.


The far right is attempting to seduce gay men in some of the same ways the early Nazi movement reached out to them, before mowing queers down in the name of fascist ideals. Only two days after the massacre at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando last year, white-nationalist meme producer (and proud homophobe)Butch Leghorn wrote on the alt-right website The Right Stuff, "This shooting [is] a very valuable wedge issue. … We simply need to hammer this issue … Spread this meeting. Drive this wedge. Smash their coalition. Make it cool to be anti-Muslim because Liberalism." Butch and his co-activists put out a plethora of memes for the occasion with, for example, a rainbow flag and the words FUCK ISLAM, and the phrases, "To be pro-Islam is to be anti-Gay … Daddy's gonna build a wall and keep you safe." Said Leghorn on The Right Stuff: "We are currently driving this wedge as deeply as possible to break off the Pro-Gay coalition into the Trump camp."
One of the many gay people who received, and began avidly sending out, such memes was Peter Boykin, a 39-year-old, married, white Virginian who had eight years earlier been suspicious of Obama because, as he told me in a phone interview, "His name is like Osama bin Laden. We don't have his birth certificate, and he came out of nowhere." Boykin, who grew up with conservative Catholic parents who had campaigned for Ronald Reagan, founded an organization called "Gays for Trump" after he attended a party of the same name at the Republican convention last July. After the Pulse shooting, he says, "People came pouring into the group. It was like Boom!" Boykin said he isn't afraid of attorney general Jeff Sessions' antigay record: "When I met him, he shook my hand, and he put my business card in his actual jacket. He was very nice to me. I don't think he's antigay at all." But Boykin is profoundly worried about Muslim immigrants (who, according to a recent Pew poll, are actually more likely to believe in tolerance of homosexuality than evangelical Christians) wanting to hurt him: "I keep seeing videos people send me where they're beheading these 13-year-old boys and throwing people off of roofs."
Longtime LGBTQ organizer Scot Nakagawa has been fighting white nationalist movements for over 30 years, now as a senior partner at ChangeLab, a think tank on racial justice. Says Nakagawa, "We have to remember that even racist white gay men are still very vulnerable to discrimination" because they're gay. "When one is under attack"—not by phantom Muslims, but by real, neighborhood gaybashers—"one picks up whatever shields one can," even shields like racism that will not fight the true threat. In Donovan's writing, it's clear that what he's terrified of most is "weakness," especially male weakness. (He notes that he feels "disgusting" if he doesn't train in a gym "for more than a few days.") It doesn't take a psychoanalyst to guess that, at bottom, he feels profoundly weak and vulnerable. O'Meara, for his part, fears that he will be destroyed by African-American and Jewish "rot" and pollution. It doesn't take a psychoanalyst to guess that he feels dirty, and at risk of decaying from within.
 Rather than simply writing off the gay men who may be attracted to white nationalism, Nakagawa says: "It is really important to think about who those people are, and to try to reach out to them. Which means having compassion for them, as difficult as that may be." Nakagawa feels that the left has too often behaved as though racism and sexism are primarily matters of personal character, rather than deep social structures that elites—the 1 percent—use to consolidate their power.
“It’s a bad choice to imagine that all these men are incredibly rich,” he adds. Rather than demonizing men who may long for a strong brotherhood to protect them in a society that is increasingly unsafe and un-nourishing for all of us, we should counter-organize among them and have the searching and committed conversations about racism and sexism that have too often eluded the gay community. In this time of great danger for both LGBTQ people and the entire country, the only real way to fight fascism is to offer a competing vision, for a society that will meet everyone’s needs rather than, as Donovan would have it, the needs of “the wolves” who seek to assert “dominance and control.” For at the end of the day, none of us is a wolf—or to say it another way, even wolves are vulnerable.   Originally posted on    SLATE





By Donna Minkowitz an American writer and journalist. She became known for her coverage of gay and lesbian politics and culture in The Village Voice from the late 1980s through the mid-1990s, for which she won a GLAAD Media Award.

February 13, 2017

“You Can’t Be Accepted Coming Out”-an AuntMary Gay Conservative





 

The day after the American election, my ex-boyfriend messaged me to confess that he had voted for Trump. Hillary Clinton, he thought, just wasn’t trustworthy enough, so instead he opted for a compulsive liar and megalomaniac. As a gay man, I was repulsed by the idea that someone I’d once shared a bed with could now be in bed with our oppressors.

Now, another gay man has decided to “come out” (his words) as a conservative, this time in a piece for the New York Post. Chadwick Moore is a 33-year-old journalist who wrote a fawning profile of the out alt-right troll Milo Yiannopoulos for Out, one of America’s premier gay men’s magazines.

Yiannopoulos’ Islamophobia, transphobia, racism, and sexism are well documented, and that an LGBT publication would give him “neutral” (as Moore claims) coverage rightfully angered many in the community. It was met with swift condemnation from within the community, with dozens of prominent LGBT journalists signing an open letter condemning the article and Out’s decision to publish. 

Moore himself took a lot of flack for writing such a flattering piece of someone who has campaigned against gay marriage and is otherwise an equally deplorable human being. He was attacked on Twitter, but to his surprise, it did not end there. “Personal friends of mine — men in their 60s who had been my long time mentors — were coming at me. They wrote on Facebook that the story was ‘irresponsible’ and ‘dangerous’. A dozen or so people unfriended me,” he whinges.  He lost his best friend. People in gay bars wouldn’t talk to him. A guy he chatted up called him a Nazi.

Delicate little snowflake can’t take the heat, it seems.

All of this has led Moore to realise he’s not a liberal after all, but is actually a conservative. Anyone who read his piece on Yiannopoulos could’ve told you that, but apparently it took being criticised for fawning over fascists for Moore to realise his own political predilections. Now he’s standing for far-right gadfly Ann Coulter and hoping that “New Yorkers can be as open-minded and accepting of my new status as a conservative man as they’ve been about my sexual orientation.”

Girl, goodnight.

Conservatism in America has literally killed gay people. Thousands lost their lives because of Reagan’s homophobic inaction on Aids. The Vice President of the United States only two years ago signed a license-to-discriminate as governor of Indiana. The right uses religion to deny marriage equality, housing protections, job protections, and even trans peoples’ right to use a public toilet. Conservative Americans are so homophobic and transphobic that the Foreign and Commonwealth Office had to issue a travel alert to LGBT Britons going to North Carolina. And unlike the British Conservative Party, the Republican Party has made no overtures towards LGBT people, no apologies for past injustices, and no attempt at including us in their vision for the country.
 
Donald Trump did say LGBT like he was trying to sound out a Welsh place name though, so these Aunt Marys (a term used to describe gay people who side with the oppressor) suddenly want all of this forgiven.

Gay conservatives aren’t welcome in gay spaces because the people they support are an existential threat to our rights and our community. After all, queer spaces (such as bars, bathhouses, community centres, and even bookstores) were founded and instrumental in radical sexual politics and political engagement. You can’t divorce that from the social aspect, because doing so would deny the history of our community and the present reality of so many vulnerable LGBT people.

Asking that the gay community embrace you and your politics is like one turkey asking another to be okay that he voted for the farmer and Thanksgiving. I don’t care if this hurts someone’s feelings; I’m more concerned with the harm their vote causes. So until American conservatism welcomes queer people, queer people shouldn’t welcome American conservatives. Even if they’re queer themselves.

Sorry, Chad. Maybe Milo will buy you a drink. 

June 10, 2015

Conservatives think Gay Marriage Fight is Over, this is Why


                                                                             



The incredibly swift public opinion battle on same-sex marriage appears to be over -- even moreso than you might think.
new Pew Research Center survey released this week reinforced what we already know: That a clear and growing majority of Americans support same-sex marriage.
But here's something perhaps even more telling: Even those who don't support same-sex marriage (mainly, religious conservatives) also think it's inevitable same-sex marriage will soon be legal across America.

When you consider the overwhelming odds for those who oppose same-sex marriage, this seems reasonable. A recap:
  • Support for legalizing gay marriage is at the nation's highest in 20 years
  • Same-sex marriage is legal in 36 states and the District of Columbia
  • The federal government, including the military, by and large recognizes same sex couples
  • The president of the United States has embraced same-sex marriage
  • A Supreme Court decision expected any day now could expand gay marriage nationwide but almost certainly wouldn't do the opposite
The empathy factor also plays in gay marriage supporters' favor. A majority of Americans now think gays are born that way, according to a recent Gallup Poll. That helps supporters shift the debate to a civil rights issue.
Perhaps most importantly, this week's Pew survey found that nine in 10 Americans know someone who is gay. And simply knowing someone who's gay is a major indicator when it comes to whether people opposed to gay marriage will change their minds, according to the 14 percent of Americans (a large number for such a partisan entrenched issue) who told Pew in 2013 that they changed their mind in support of gay marriage.
"Once Americans became comfortable with gays on a personal level, it became easier to reconcile their opinions toward gays, and shift on gay marriage," Glen Bolger of the Republican polling firm Public Opinion Strategies told our own Chris Cillizza last month.
In the face of all this, social conservatives seem to have moved on to other priorities. A scan of 10  prominent social conservative groups' websites finds only two have mentions of the same-sex marriage debate, and only one on its home page. The upcoming Supreme Court decision on Obamacare subsidies dominates the conservative base's digital ink.
Meanwhile, conservative supporters of same-sex marriage are arguably doing more than opponents. Alex Roarty in National Journal attended one such event recently:
"Even foes such as the Family Research Council's Tony Perkins acknowledge that Young Conservatives for the Freedom to Marry and its allies this year are better organized in this fight than his side."
Republicans, whose official platform is that marriage is between a man and a woman, aren't blasting gay marriage the way they do the president's nuclear deal with Iran or Hillary Clinton's e-mail scandal. GOP presidential candidates like Sen. Marco Rubio and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker say they support constitutional amendments that let states define marriage as between one man and one woman, but also say they'd attend or have attended a gay friend or relative's wedding.
All this may not change the minds of social conservatives. But it seems to have convinced them to at least give up the fight.

Amber Phillips writes about politics for The Fix. She was previously the one-woman D.C. bureau for the Las Vegas Sun and has reported from Boston and Taiwan.
washingtonpost.com

April 20, 2014

CNN: Right Wingers in US More Dangerous than Jihadists


                                                                           


On Sunday, a man shot and killed a 14-year-old boy and his grandfather at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City and then drove to a nearby Jewish retirement community where he shot and killed a third person. Police arrested a suspect, Frazier Glenn Cross, who shouted “Heil Hitler" after he was taken into custody.

Cross, who also goes by Frazier Glenn Miller, is a well-known right wing extremist who founded the Carolina Knights of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Patriot Party, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Now let's do the thought experiment in which instead of shouting "Heil Hitler" after he was arrested, the suspect had shouted "Allahu Akbar." Only two days before the first anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings, this simple switch of words would surely have greatly increased the extent and type of coverage the incident received.
 
Yet the death toll in the shootings in Kansas is similar to that of last year's Boston Marathon bombings, where three people were killed and the suspects later killed a police officer as they tried to evade capture. (Many more, of course, were also wounded in the Boston attacks; 16 men, women and children lost limbs.)

In fact, since 9/11 extremists affiliated with a variety of far-right wing ideologies, including white supremacists, anti-abortion extremists and anti-government militants, have killed more people in the United States than have extremists motivated by al Qaeda's ideology. According to a count by the New America Foundation, right wing extremists have killed 34 people in the United States for political reasons since 9/11. (The total includes the latest shootings in Kansas, which are being classified as a hate crime).

"Since 9/11 extremists affiliated with a variety of far-right wing ideologies...have killed more people in the United States than have extremists motivated by al Qaeda's ideology."
By contrast, terrorists motivated by al Qaeda’s ideology have killed 21 people in the United States since 9/11.

(Although a variety of left wing militants and environmental extremists have carried out violent attacks for political reasons against property and individuals since 9/11, none have been linked to a lethal attack, according to research by the New America Foundation.)
Moreover, since 9/11 none of the more than 200 individuals indicted or convicted in the United States of some act of jihadist terrorism have acquired or used chemical or biological weapons or their precursor materials, while 13 individuals motivated by right wing extremist ideology, one individual motivated by left-wing extremist ideology, and two with idiosyncratic beliefs, used or acquired such weapons or their precursors.

Opinion: Why do racists and anti-Semites kill?

A similar attack to the one that Frazier Glenn Cross is accused of in Kansas occurred in August 2012 when Wade Michael Page killed six people in a shooting at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin. Page was a member of a white supremacist band and associated with the Hammerskins, a white supremacist group. Page committed suicide during the attack.

Page is not, of course, the only right wing extremist to have used lethal violence to achieve political ends. In 2009, for instance, Shawna Forde, Albert Gaxiola, and Jason Bush raided a house in Arizona, killing Raul Flores and his daughter Brisenia. The three attackers sought to use the burglary to finance their anti-immigration vigilante group, Minutemen American Defense. Forde and Bush were convicted and sentenced to death. Gaxiola was sentenced to life in prison.

Also in 2009, Scott Roeder murdered Dr. George Tiller, who ran an abortion clinic in Wichita, Kansas. In 2010 Roeder was convicted of first-degree murder. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, Roeder not only had ties to the extreme anti-abortion movement, but he also had been pulled over while driving with a fake license plate bearing the markings of the Sovereign Citizens, a movement of individuals who deny that the government has authority over them.

 Kansas shooting victim loved to sing Expert: Suspect hated by supremacists Son of shooting victim speaks to CNN
Of course, the deadliest terrorist attack on American soil prior to 9/11 was the Oklahoma City bombing, which was masterminded by Timothy McVeigh, a man with deep ties to far-right militant circles. McVeigh killed 168 people when he bombed the Alfred P. Murrah federal building on April 19, 1995.

Despite this history of deadly violence by individuals motivated by political ideologies other than al Qaeda, it is jihadist violence that continues to dominate the news and the attention of policy makers.
Some of this is quite understandable. After all, on 9/11 al Qaeda's 19 terrorists killed almost 3,000 people in the space of a morning. Since then al Qaeda's branch in Yemen tried to bring down with a bomb secreted on a passenger an American commercial jet flying over Detroit on Christmas Day 2009 and al Qaeda's branch in Pakistan tried to launch bombings on the New York subway system a few months earlier. Luckily those plots didn’t succeed, but certainly if they had the death toll would have been on a large scale.

Yet the disparity in media coverage between even failed jihadist terrorist attacks and this latest incident in Kansas is emblematic of a flawed division in the public’s mind between killing that is purportedly committed in the name of Allah and killing that is committed for other political ends, such as neo-Nazi beliefs about the need to kill Jews.

Part of the reason for this disconnect might be that when a Department of Homeland Security report warning of violent right wing extremism was leaked in 2009, it generated a substantial political controversy.

In a 2011 interview with the Southern Poverty Law Center, Daryl Johnson, the leader of the team that produced the report, argued that following the controversy, DHS's examination of such threats suffered, stating "Since our report was leaked, DHS has not released a single report of its own on this topic. Not anything dealing with non-Islamic domestic extremism—whether it’s anti-abortion extremists, white supremacists, 'sovereign citizens,' eco-terrorists, the whole gamut."

The threat from al Qaeda and its associated forces has changed significantly since 9/11. Today, almost 13 years after 9/11, al Qaeda has not successfully conducted another attack inside the United States. And since 2011, no individual charged with plotting to conduct an al Qaeda-inspired terrorist attack inside the United States has acted with more than one accomplice. This demonstrates the difficulties today of forming a jihadist group sufficiently large enough to conduct a complex attack anything on the scale of 9/11, and is a tribute to the success of law enforcement agencies in detecting and deterring jihadist terrorist activity.

Today in the United States, al Qaeda-type terrorism is the province of individuals with no real connection to foreign terrorists, aside from reading their propaganda online. Given this, it becomes harder to explain, in terms of American national security, why violence by homegrown right wing extremists receives substantially less attention than does violence by homegrown jihadist militants.

Peter Bergen is CNN's national security analyst, a director at the New America Foundation and the author of "Manhunt: The Ten-Year Search for bin Laden -- From 9/11 to Abbottabad." David Sterman is a research assistant at the New America Foundation.

Tyler Hite contributed research support for this article.

August 7, 2013

Strange Bedfellows American Conservatives and Gay Bashers in Russia



(This posting comes from Russian Newspaper RIA Novosti)

Politics, it has been said, makes strange bedfellows. 

Now, as US gay rights groups protest against Russia’s new laws on homosexuality, conservatives across America have quietly begun to align themselves with the Russian government in a rare union that defies a long history of animosity.
“Russia could be a great ally for conservatives, on issues like defending the family, abortions, even strengthening marriage and promoting more children,” said Larry Jacobs, managing director the World Congress of Families, an Illinois-based organization that promotes traditional family values in the US and abroad, in an interview with RIA Novosti.
Next year the group plans to hold its eighth annual International Congress in Moscow, a move Jacobs said was “absolutely” an indication of support for Russia’s growing conservative stance on a number of social issues. 
Other conservative groups are also joining what might seem to be an odd alliance.
"We fully support the widespread notion in Russia that homosexuality has no place in the teaching of children. We also welcome the leading role Russia is taking on this issue at the United Nations,” said Austin Ruse, president of theCatholic Family & Human Rights Institute, a US-based non-profit research group that works to defend life and family values around the world, in a statement to RIA Novosti.
“Russians do not want to follow America’s reckless and decadent promotion of gender confusion, sexual perversion, and anti-biblical ideologies to youth,” said Peter LaBarbera, president of Americans For Truth About Homosexuality (AFTAH), a group “dedicated to exposing the homosexual activist agenda,” in a statement on the organization’s website. 
US conservatives have long opposed communist ideology and limitations of freedoms that were once the law of the land in the Soviet Union, a state the late US President Ronald Reagan once called an “evil empire.” 
“For 70 years we fought the communists, and some conservatives still associate Russia with a far left communist country, when the reality is, among the more powerful nations, Russia is one of the most conservative countries in the world,” Jacobs said.
In June, the group endorsed Russia’s ban on the promotion among minors of “non-traditional relationships.” Proponents both in Russia and in the United States argue that it shields children from harmful influences.
But the new law has outraged the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) community and its supporters in the United States and elsewhere. They claim it potentially criminalizes everything from wearing a rainbow lapel pin to gay couples holding hands in public and effectively encourages persecution of homosexuals.
“A few marginal figures on the American anti-gay right, having lost the battle to criminalize and stigmatize homosexuality in the US, are now turning to foreign markets which they perceive as more receptive to their agenda,” said Jonathan Rauch, Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institute and author of “Gay Marriage: Why It Is Good for Gays, Good for Straights, and Good for America.”
“The good news is that they don't have much of a constituency in the US… The not-so-good news is that they're capable of encouraging and legitimizing human-rights violators abroad,” Rauch added in a statement to RIA Novosti.
Conservatives say while they reject homosexuality, they also oppose violence.
"We deplore and condemn all forms of violence visited upon anyone including lesbians, gays, bi-sexuals and the transgendered,” said Ruse. 
It is “a strange twist of historical fate” for conservative groups to look to Russia “as the world's foremost defender of traditional values,” said James Kirchick, an international journalist and fellow at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, a Washington-based non-profit policy institute.
“After all, Russia today under the heel of President Vladimir Putin is arguably less free than it was in the late stages of the Soviet Union under Mikhail Gorbachev,” Kirchick wrote in an article in The Daily Beast
Really, he wrote, the conservative’s new enthusiasm for men inside the Kremlin, “has everything to do with the Russian government’s anti-gay crackdown, a crackdown they relish seeing take place here in America.”
Not so, said Jacobs, the head of the World Congress of Families.
“Russians, a lot of those in the Orthodox Church and pro-family groups, they want to see Russia return to some stability and that only comes thru strong values and a return to morality,” he said, something he would welcome in America.
“But if you’ve ever seen what happens at a gay pride, there is pornography, they mimic sexual acts, there’s nudity. It is not just people wearing rainbow colors. If all they did was wave flags, that’d be great, I just haven’t seen one where that’s the case,” he added. 
  (By Maria Young for RIA Novosti) –


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