Showing posts with label Alternate Truth (Lies). Show all posts
Showing posts with label Alternate Truth (Lies). Show all posts

December 14, 2017

Undercover Agent for One Year On The Alt-Right in The UK and US



 Patrik Hermasson. Undercover in the UK and USA on Communities of the Alt. Right

Imagine spending a year undercover among the alt-right in the United Kingdom and the United States. That's just what Patrik Hermansson ( a young gay Swedish activist who used the pseudonym Erik Hellberg ) did for HOPE not hate.One of the places Hermansson found himself was at the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia this past summer where Heather Heyer was killed.

"I think witnessing an attack on defenseless people can only be traumatic," said Hermansson. "What I saw after Heather and the others were attacked was probably the best humanity has to offer. Everyone came together to help with some using their banners to give shade to the ambulance personnel and while others took care of those who were psychologically traumatized. That gave me hope."
Hermansson, who grew up in Stockholm, recently got his Master's degree in political science and currently works for HOPE not hate as a researcher. His boss is senior researcher Dr. Joe Mulhall.

HOPE not hate was founded in the UK 14 years ago by its Chief Executive Nick Lowles to fight against fascists and extremists that were becoming an electoral threat there.
Prior to moving to the United Kingdom, Hermansson volunteered for Expo, the Swedish anti-racism group, as their newspaper photographer and researcher.

"I am quite left-wing, and the alt-right belief system is the opposite of that—including being anti-egalitarian, anti-feminist, anti-LGBT and anti-Democratic," said Hermansson. "When I was in Sweden, I did HIV and LGBTQ activism at first and then moved on to anti-racist and anti-fascist activism and that's how I got involved with Expo."

Hermansson noted that right-wing extremists of all stripes are fixated on Scandinavia and Sweden specifically for different reasons. He said they are obsessed with Scandinavia because of the pagan gods Thor and Odin and what they represent, which is white supremacy.

"Sweden internationally, especially on the far-right, has come to epitomize left-wing society including high taxes for social programs which they are against," said Hermansson. "The Pride March in Stockholm and other Swedish cities have gotten attacked by far-right groups who stand at the side of the road with anti-LGBTQ banners with some trying to provoke the marchers in recent years and people have come to expect that this will happen. In 2015/2016 Sweden had a lot of refugees from places like Syria so now the far-right sees the country as failing due to our socialist policies and open immigration policy."

Hermansson explained that he was asked to do this assignment because he was trusted and fit the profile in terms of his demographic makeup and credentials ( a university education ) that are desirable among far-right leaders. He noted that these groups are always looking to grow and renew themselves with new members. The goal, Hermansson said, was to show the public what they were doing at the local level, where they were campaigning and their future plans.
"People underestimate them and we need all the tools possible to mobilize our campaign team on the grassroots level to counteract their message," said Hermansson.

"We don't take sending people undercover lightly because of the risk it involves," said Mulhall. "Many groups on the far-right try to portray a false or more moderate image to the public. By going undercover we can reveal how extreme and dangerous they really are. Patrik was incredibly brave and did amazing work that will really damage the far-right."
Using a hidden camera, Hermansson documented everything and the footage, along with other information, was turned into a documentary HOPE not hate will be releasing soon.
Hermansson started out by telling these groups he wanted to be a part of their movement. Over time, Hermansson needed to gather more information so he told them he was writing a master's thesis about the suppression of right-wing speech. This allowed him to expand his network without anyone getting suspicious and gave him access to leaders such as reclusive Counter-Currents Publishing Editor-in-Chief Greg Johnson and AltRight Corporation Co-Founder Jason Reza Jorjani ( American white nationalist Richard Spencer is another co-founder ), among others.

"After all those months with them, I became desensitized," said Hermansson. "I learned to listen for hours without raising an eyebrow to ideas that I initially reacted to viscerally. Bit-by-bit it became normal to me and even if you are fundamentally against these ideas you learn to live with them. I was told that bringing acceptance of far-right ideas in the mainstream is an explicit strategy by some of the leaders of these groups. That is what is so frightening.

"I learned that these groups are getting more confident in their ideas and expressing them in public. They are less concerned with how they are perceived by people, especially in the U.S. The key takeaway for me is to challenge them and their hateful messages everywhere we can to show these types of ideas are unacceptable and will come with a social cost. It might not stop those who are already convinced but those that are on the edges might be deterred."

Hermansson said the groups he infiltrated are very hostile toward anyone who is not a white, straight, cisgender person and traditional binary gender roles are a core component of how they see the world. He explained that they also talked about white people being under attack which they call "white genocide." One of their messages, Hermansson noted, was to have as many white kids as possible to ensure white majority status in the Western world.

"They blame LGBTQ people because we supposedly cannot have children and due to this are contributing to the downfall of western civilization," said Hermansson. "There were times when I wanted to argue with them but of course I could not do that because I had a bigger project to accomplish."

Mulhall noted that they have a preoccupation with hierarchy and male-only spaces and that has created a complicated relationship with sexuality. The alt-light ( the moderate wing of the alternative right ), Mulhall explained, has embraced white gay people such as Milo Yiannopolous and Lucian Wintrich ( Twinks4Trump photo series creator ) among others to prove they are better than Muslims when it comes to LGBTQ rights.

"Deep-rooted angst at their own masculine ranking, exacerbated by the homoeroticism found in some male spaces, has led to a virulent homophobia in the alt-right, with gay men placed at the very bottom of the male hierarchy," said Mulhall.

Lowles said Hermansson going undercover gave them invaluable information about "the structure of the alt-right, it's funding, its aims, how it recruited new people and the methods it employed to 'get under the radar' in terms of mainstreaming its opinions.

"Patrik being on the inside allowed us to capture the true face and beliefs of this movement. Simply put, a camera or a notepad would have changed the person in front of it. Many of their views are published online, however, certain topics are discussed only behind closed doors and can only truly be captured when you are on the 'inside'."

Mulhall noted that HOPE not hate is in the process of establishing a presence in the US, setting up a research operation to monitor these international links among far-right groups and will be launching on the ground political campaigns in the coming year.

HOPE not hate recently released a report, "The International Alternative Right: From Charlottesville to the White House" ( ALTERNATIVERIGHT.HOPENOTHATE.COM/ ) that outlines what it learned over the past year, including the information Hermansson provided to the organization.

"Our message is that those who foment and stoke the flames of ethnic and sectarian hatred must be opposed and exposed, in the interests of peaceful co-existence," said Lowles.
Hermansson's plans for the future include continuing to work for HOPE not hate as a researcher "looking at the far-right but with a little bit of distance."

Gay activist details undercover journey inside alt-right
by Carrie Maxwell, Windy City Times
2017-12-13 
See hopenothate.com/ for more information .

August 19, 2017

The Alt. Right is Driven Right Out of Boston by Counter Protestors(on Video)











June 6, 2017

How The Alt. Right is Using Sex, Campiness to Attract Gays to Fascism








At the National Policy Institute’s 2015 conference, alt-right star Richard Spencer's annual Nazi-fest, a speaker named Jack Donovan exhorted the crowd "to leave the world the way you entered it, kicking and screaming and covered in somebody else's blood." The same year, in the pages of the The Occidental Observer, one of the most prominent white nationalist webzines, another alt-righter, James J. O'Meara, held forth about how "behind the Negro, hidden away, as always, is the darker, more sinister figure of the Judeo. The Negro is the shock troop. The Jew is the ultimate beneficiary.” Aside from being open fascists and “white racialists,” Donovan and O’Meara have another thing in common: They’re both out gay men.
In his book The Homo and the Negro, O'Meara says that gay white men represent the best of what Western culture has to offer because of their "intelligence" and "beauty," and that "Negroes" represent the worst, being incapable of "achievement." Donovan calls women "whores" and "bitches," and, when a questioner on Reddit asked him his views of the Holocaust, responded, "What is this Holocaust thing? I'm drawing a blank."                                                    



Both have become influential figures in the alt-right; horribly, they are not the only gay men to respond to an olive branch lately offered by white nationalism. The opening of this movement to cisgender gay men is a radical change, "one of the biggest changes I've seen on the right in 40 years," says Chip Berlet, co-author of Right-Wing Populism in America. In the United States, unlike in Europe, out gay men have never been welcome in white supremacist groups. The Klan and neo-Nazi groups, the main previous incarnations of white hate in this country, were and still are violently anti-queer. And while a subset of openly gay men has always been conservative (or, as in all populations, casually racist), they never sought to join the racist right.
That was before groups like NPI, Counter-Currents Publishing, and American Renaissance started putting out the welcome mat. Since around 2010, some (though by no means all) groups in the leadership of the white nationalist movement have been inviting out cis gay men to speak at their conferences, write for their magazines, and be interviewed in their journals. Donovan and O'Meara, far to the right of disgraced provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos, are the white nationalist movement's actual queer stars. But there are others in the ranks, like Douglas Pearce of the popular neofolk band Death in June. And there are many more gay men (and some trans women) who have been profoundly influenced by two white nationalist ideas: the "threat" posed by Islam and the "danger" posed by immigrants.
Donovan tries to sugarcoat his own racist beliefs when speaking to his main fan base, gay men who like his macho looks and straight men from the "pickup artist" culture and the manosphere who are desperately trying to learn from him how to be manly. Instead, reverting to the other half of the Nazi playbook, he prefers to highlight his hatred for "effeminacy," feminism, and "weakness." A beautifully muscular man of 42 who has perfected a masculine scowl in the many photographs of himself he releases on his website and Facebook page, he functions as beefcake for the neofascist cause. He’s parlayed his butch allure into a brand, earning money from a line of T-shirts and wrist guards that say things like BARBARIAN and a series of books that seek to instruct both straight and gay men in how to become more masculine and in particular, more "violent." 
One of my Facebook friends, a politically liberal gay man I'll call Frank, is a fan of Donovan's Facebook page "because of the visuals. I like his looks—I mean, he's bald with tattoos. He really exudes a lot of sex." Frank also likes that Donovan "trashes that whole gay club scene," which Frank finds conformist and alienating.
But when Donovan says violence, he means violence. This is not BDSM. "The ability to use violence effectively is the highest value of masters," Donovan said in a 2017 speech at a fascist think tank in Germany. "It is the primary value of those who create order, who create worlds. Violence is a golden value. Violence rules. Violence is not evil–it is elemental." Though Donovan tries to mine the latent sexiness in violence for all it’s worth, he is, in fact, against consensual BDSM, condemning it in a 2010 essay as part of a long list of evils that he feels has been perpetuated by gay culture: the "extreme promiscuity, sadomasochism, transvestism, transsexuality, and flamboyant effeminacy" promoted by "the pink-haired, punk rock stepchildren of feminism," gay activists. No, it's straight-up people hurting and killing other people he's endorsing.
And what is all this violence for? Creating small, decentralized "homelands" in this country separated by—surprise!—race. He enthusiastically embraces an idea the alt-right calls "pan-secessionism," under which, as Donovan says in his book A Sky Without Eagles, "gangs" of white men would form "autonomous zones" for themselves and white women, where women "would not be permitted to rule or take part in … political life." The gangs would enforce racial boundary lines, because, as Donovan puts it, whites have "radically different values [and] cultures" than other people, and "loyalty requires preference. It requires discrimination.
In a 2011 essay, “Mighty White,” Donovan says, “race is not my favorite issue to write about”  because “I know too well that it distracts people from the bulk of my work" on the sexiness of violent masculinity. (If people associated him more with white nationalism than machismo, it could impede sales of his clothing line, books, patches, and the tattoos he sells out of a Portland-area gym.) And indeed, at the end of May, Donovan wrote a long, rambling post on his website trying to dissociate himself from white nationalism. The post may have been a response to the enormous public anger in Portland, Oregon (where Donovan lives), following white nationalist Jeremy Christian's murder of two men for defending women of color on a commuter train on May 26. In the essay, Donovan claimed he doesn't want to organize anyone politically, rather "I just want to hang out in the woods with … the people who I am oathed to, my tribe, the Wolves of Vinland"—a white, "neopagan" quasi-military brotherhood recognized as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center. (Wolves of Vinland member Maurice Michaely recently spent two years in prison for burning down a black church in Virginia.)
But Donovan’s recent hand-wringing does not erase the fact that on his website he’s repeatedly said real men want to "control our borders," decried the “black-on-white crime rate,” denounced “the deeply entrenched anti-white bias” of our culture, and said, "I support White Nationalists," who "I call … 'The Mighty Whites.' " Recently, he admiringly interviewed the two young men who lead Germany's anti-African, anti-Arab identitarian movement. On his podcast, the men, one of whom used to belong to a neo-Nazi group in Austria, boast about attacking a mosque and disrupting refugee theater. He also has begun whispering praise for Julius Evola, the Italian anti-Semite and fascist who joined Hitler's SS.
If Donovan is a caricature of the gay Nazi strongman—almost a personification of the phrase "body fascism" (which was originally used by gay men to critique other gay men's obsession with perfect gym bodies)—his counterpart, James O'Meara, is an embodiment of something that could barely be imagined until now: Nazi camp. I hesitate to write that phrase, because it's almost painful to acknowledge that camp—that subversive, gay "turning" of seriousness into playfulness and straight narratives into gay ones—could be deployed by a Nazi. But of course it can: If the emergence of out gay white nationalists shows anything, it's that LGBTQ people truly are everywhere, for good and for ill. And that we no longer have the luxury of assuming that queer tropes are inherently, and trans-historically, progressive.



Far femmier than Donovan in both looks and tone, O'Meara writes alternately smirking and playful essays for Counter-Currents about men's clothing, the closeted Cardinal Spellman, the "homoromanticism" of the Boy Scouts, and the political economy of The Gilmore Girls. O'Meara openly loves Hitler, but he also grooves to the socialist Oscar Wilde, andin an interview with the webzine Alternative Right, admiringly quotes "Bunny" Roger, the gay British dandy and World War II heroas saying: "Now that I've killed so many Nazis Daddy will haveto buy me a sable coat." But his "fun" paragraphs always end up at the same un-playful conclusion: "the Judaic is always there, blocking the way" and spreading "rot" throughout American culture. "The Jew" is deliberately destroying the country by building up "Negroes" and promoting "the alien, dissolute, demonic culture of the Africans." In a podcast, O'Meara said, "The blacks get their chicks pregnant as soon as they turn 15, and have 30 different children with 10 different women" because of Jewish scheming: "the poison that the Jewish mentality introduces" promotes heterosexual sex and "girl-craziness" instead of the glorious gayness that would dominate "if the Jews hadn't taken over Hollywood."
Of course, neither O’Meara nor Donovan actually support gay rights. This is partly because they don't believe in "civil rights." Although O'Meara wants to be part of an imagined elite band of men who love each other and rule society—his version of an Aryan fantasy called the Männerbund—he doesn't want to support, as he put it in the interview with Alternative Right, "some sniveling queen demanding 'my rights!' … 'The plight of the homosexual' … is a Leftist myth." Donovan says explicitly that straight people should be given more power and privileges than gay folks, because their "reproductive sexuality" is superior to ours. Both men openly detest lesbians and trans and genderqueer people: Donovan calls the trans movement "men who want to cut their dicks off and women who want to cut their tits off." And of course, no white nationalist organization anywhere supports LGBTQ rights on a social or legislative level. Their new "support" is limited to allowing cis gay men who are white racists to join them.



So why are white nationalists smiling in our direction? Most importantly, because it worked in Europe. In Holland, France, Germany, and Sweden, white nationalists have deliberately used LGBTQ people and Muslims as a wedge against one another. Polls show that over one third of French gay men supported Le Pen in the recent election despite her promise to end same-sex marriage, and in Germany, the far-right AfD recently tapped an out lesbian banker to run for chancellor. (The AfD is even more hostile to actual pro-gay policies than France's National Front is.) Sweden's fascist party organized an LGBTQ pride parade through Muslim neighborhoods, and of course, in Holland, Pim Fortuyn and later Geert Wilders tried to make "Islam" synonymous with "hatred of gays." Their ultimate goal was to make hatred of immigrants "progressive."
Bringing queer people in, in both Europe and America, is a way to grow the neo-fascist movement. It is also a way to court millennials, who are consistently supportive of gay rights even when they swing conservative on other issues. It's a testament to the fact that, in some ways, the queer movement has already won the battle for public opinion. The far right could not beat us, so they decided to join us—in the most superficial way possible. Ultimately, it's a form of pinkwashing, which YourDictionary defines as “the practice of representing something … as gay-friendly in order to soften or downplay aspects of its reputation considered negative.” How could Le Pen, or Wilders, or other open racists be so bad when they like queer people?
There is another potential benefit: If white supremacists can equate "Muslims" with attacks on LGBTQ people—and women—they might be able to attract liberals and moderates into a kind of anti-immigrant "big tent." This would complement their effort to portray racism as “pro-worker.” It’s hardly incidental that both Donovan and O’Meara see themselves as anti-capitalist. Like the many gay men who joined Hitler’s SA (the unit led by the out Ernst Röhm), they see a Nazi-like movement as somehow offering salvation from both antigay and economic oppression. (Of course, Hitler ultimately slaughtered Röhm and other SA gay men in the Night of the Long Knives.


The far right is attempting to seduce gay men in some of the same ways the early Nazi movement reached out to them, before mowing queers down in the name of fascist ideals. Only two days after the massacre at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando last year, white-nationalist meme producer (and proud homophobe)Butch Leghorn wrote on the alt-right website The Right Stuff, "This shooting [is] a very valuable wedge issue. … We simply need to hammer this issue … Spread this meeting. Drive this wedge. Smash their coalition. Make it cool to be anti-Muslim because Liberalism." Butch and his co-activists put out a plethora of memes for the occasion with, for example, a rainbow flag and the words FUCK ISLAM, and the phrases, "To be pro-Islam is to be anti-Gay … Daddy's gonna build a wall and keep you safe." Said Leghorn on The Right Stuff: "We are currently driving this wedge as deeply as possible to break off the Pro-Gay coalition into the Trump camp."
One of the many gay people who received, and began avidly sending out, such memes was Peter Boykin, a 39-year-old, married, white Virginian who had eight years earlier been suspicious of Obama because, as he told me in a phone interview, "His name is like Osama bin Laden. We don't have his birth certificate, and he came out of nowhere." Boykin, who grew up with conservative Catholic parents who had campaigned for Ronald Reagan, founded an organization called "Gays for Trump" after he attended a party of the same name at the Republican convention last July. After the Pulse shooting, he says, "People came pouring into the group. It was like Boom!" Boykin said he isn't afraid of attorney general Jeff Sessions' antigay record: "When I met him, he shook my hand, and he put my business card in his actual jacket. He was very nice to me. I don't think he's antigay at all." But Boykin is profoundly worried about Muslim immigrants (who, according to a recent Pew poll, are actually more likely to believe in tolerance of homosexuality than evangelical Christians) wanting to hurt him: "I keep seeing videos people send me where they're beheading these 13-year-old boys and throwing people off of roofs."
Longtime LGBTQ organizer Scot Nakagawa has been fighting white nationalist movements for over 30 years, now as a senior partner at ChangeLab, a think tank on racial justice. Says Nakagawa, "We have to remember that even racist white gay men are still very vulnerable to discrimination" because they're gay. "When one is under attack"—not by phantom Muslims, but by real, neighborhood gaybashers—"one picks up whatever shields one can," even shields like racism that will not fight the true threat. In Donovan's writing, it's clear that what he's terrified of most is "weakness," especially male weakness. (He notes that he feels "disgusting" if he doesn't train in a gym "for more than a few days.") It doesn't take a psychoanalyst to guess that, at bottom, he feels profoundly weak and vulnerable. O'Meara, for his part, fears that he will be destroyed by African-American and Jewish "rot" and pollution. It doesn't take a psychoanalyst to guess that he feels dirty, and at risk of decaying from within.
 Rather than simply writing off the gay men who may be attracted to white nationalism, Nakagawa says: "It is really important to think about who those people are, and to try to reach out to them. Which means having compassion for them, as difficult as that may be." Nakagawa feels that the left has too often behaved as though racism and sexism are primarily matters of personal character, rather than deep social structures that elites—the 1 percent—use to consolidate their power.
“It’s a bad choice to imagine that all these men are incredibly rich,” he adds. Rather than demonizing men who may long for a strong brotherhood to protect them in a society that is increasingly unsafe and un-nourishing for all of us, we should counter-organize among them and have the searching and committed conversations about racism and sexism that have too often eluded the gay community. In this time of great danger for both LGBTQ people and the entire country, the only real way to fight fascism is to offer a competing vision, for a society that will meet everyone’s needs rather than, as Donovan would have it, the needs of “the wolves” who seek to assert “dominance and control.” For at the end of the day, none of us is a wolf—or to say it another way, even wolves are vulnerable.   Originally posted on    SLATE





By Donna Minkowitz an American writer and journalist. She became known for her coverage of gay and lesbian politics and culture in The Village Voice from the late 1980s through the mid-1990s, for which she won a GLAAD Media Award.

May 1, 2017

Extremist of The Alt Fascist Ultra Right-Gays But Anti Gay



 Jack Donovan 42. He has his own truth about what a gay man is and what  he has become



Jack Donovan — a 42-year-old skinhead icon and right-wing extremist — lived the gay life once. It was in the 1990s, after he left his parents’ blue-collar home in rural Pennsylvania to study fine art in New York, when he danced go-go in gay clubs hung out with drag queens and marched for gay pride. But then he dropped out, learned how to use tools and work as a manual laborer, studied MMA, and decided he wasn’t gay — just “an unrepentant masculinist.”
“I am not gay because the word gay connotes so much more than same-sex desire,” Donovan announced, under a pseudonym, on the first page of 2006’s Androphilia: A Manifesto: Rejecting the Gay Identity, Reclaiming Masculinity (echoing, probably unintentionally, the speech Tony Kushner wrote for Roy Cohn in Angels in America). “The word gay describes a whole cultural and political movement that promotes anti-male feminism, victim mentality, and leftist politics.” He appropriated a new term, androphile, to describe a man whose love of masculinity includes sex with other men.


                                                                                                 To hear Donovan tell it, his sexuality is a nonissue. It’s a point echoed by several of his peers, who don’t see their political views and sexual identities as contradictory but complementary. “Masculinity is a religion, and I see potential for androphiles to become its priests,” Donovan wrote in Androphilia, “to devote themselves to it” in a way that men who understand their manliness through women — in quantifying the number they’ve slept with or measuring “men’s rights” against “women’s rights” — can’t. And so androphiles like Donovan have found common ground with the gender-traditionalists and male-advocacy groups elsewhere in the messy carnival of the new right, where reactions to women range from outright hostility to benign disinterest.

Beyond Alt: Understanding the New Far Right Gay men are remarkably prominent — if not exactly abundant — in the alt-right universe. Take the infamous Milo Yiannopoulos, who powered a meteoric rise and fall on the sheer cognitive dissonance between his flamboyant self-presentation and callous politics. (When Outmagazine profiled Milo, the story’s writer Chadwick Moore “came out as a conservative.”) Or artist turned reporter Lucian Wintrich, who joined the White House press corps when Trump-cheering blog Gateway Pundit (edited by a gay man) received its first credential. But even those men seem relatively mainstream when you compare them with Donovan, who has contributed to “dapper white nationalist” (and friend) Richard Spencer’s journal, advocates for a form of “anarcho-fascism,” and founded a chapter of a masculinist “tribe” called the Wolves of Vinland, which the Southern Poverty Law Center classifies as a hate group. (One member recently served time for burning down a historically black church.) Which makes sense when he shows me photos from their neopagan fight-club rituals, which sometimes involve nooses.
And they’re not interested in queer solidarity, either. “Apart from Camille Paglia, of course, I can’t think of any interesting lesbians,” gay white nationalist James O’Meara told me in an interview. Or as Donovan said, “I think most of them are so married to feminism that I don’t think that’s even an option.” To say nothing of trans issues, which most gay alt-righters rejected (“I know three transgender people in our movement,” Counter-Currents editor Greg Johnson offered, before arguing against the designation. “White nationalism should be straight but not narrow,” he said, inadvertently repeating a slogan popularized by an anti-bullying LGBT nonprofit.)

Donovan sees himself as a member of the earliest generation of gay men who could be free to ditch the “victim mentality” of queer politics. In Androphilia, he praises activists who fought to decriminalize gay sex and to combat institutional indifference to AIDS “It would be remiss not to credit the Gay Rights Movement for fighting against this sort of oppression, intolerance, and intentional negligence,” he writes, but “having achieved relative tolerance for same-sex-oriented people in mainstream culture, and having brought an end to police harassment and widespread discrimination, the Gay Rights Movement has turned to nitpicking.” He isn’t against identity politics. He’s loud and proud about his race and his gender — traits that, unlike his sexuality, do not make him a minority. “Ten out of ten minorities agree that being a minority can really blow,” he explains in “Mighty White,” an essay defending white nationalism in those who fear losing, or in some contexts have already lost, majority racial status. 
Donovan — whose partner of 20 years is a Trump supporter of Mexican descent — supports white nationalists, but denies belonging in their ranks. “I just think that’s a silly goal,” he says of the so-called white ethnostate. Whiteness, he points out, “is an American approximation of nationality,” which doesn’t make as much sense as, say, German nationalism — which he became familiar with when he delivered a speech praising masculine violence at a far-right German nationalist convention near Leipzig in February. Violence is a component of Donovan’s “gang theory of masculinity,” an idea he became so enamored of that he felt he could not actualize as a man until he had a gang of his own. Enter the Wolves of Vinland, a club started near Lynchburg, Virginia, by brothers Paul and Matthias Waggener, a pair of avid bodybuilders who love blackmetal bands (a.k.a. National Socialist Black Metal bands). The sons of an Orthodox priest, the Waggeners have said in interviews that they experimented with drugs, satanism, and “gangster shit” before discovering neopaganism, also known as “heathenism,” which became the foundation of their club.
“The rest of the Wolves are not homos, and we don’t consider ourselves a white-nationalist or alt-right group,” Donovan clarifies by email. White nationalists and the alt-right do, however, seem to consider them kin, judging by the frequency of pro-Vinland programming in white-nationalist and alt-right media. One thing those groups share is an intellectual foundation of gender and race essentialism: “Our women are females, they’re females, and our males are masculine, and we don’t look for sameness between sexes,” Paul Waggener told Greg Johnson in an interview. To be masculine, a man doesn’t need to have sex with women — although he should probably be stronger than women, and hold his own in brawls, and have tactical skills, and provide. And he should be brave, which is why Donovan gets so irritated when he’s accused of homophobia. “That’s a construction. That’s a silencing word and it’s meant to emasculate,” he says. “When you say someone’s phobic, you’re saying that they’re afraid. That’s why they call men phobic constantly — they’re transphobic, they’re homophobic, they’re afraid of women.” Political correctness “is just a way of calling a man a coward.” (When it comes to language, Jack is more sensitive about ideology than sexuality. He still doesn’t like the word gay but occasionally uses it for conversational expediency and punch lines about “being gay” with his boyfriend about their new pet dog.)
Who feels fear, and why, and whether their fear is rational, seems to be at the heart of the mainstream’s tension with the alt-right. If a man gives a speech called “Violence Is Golden,” is that scary? What if his audience includes white nationalists? And if he’s gay, does that change, well, anything? Not really, says historian Jim Downs, author of Stand by Me: The Forgotten History of Gay Liberation. “If you look at every movement, you’re going to find these moments” of unexpected orientations and identities that seem anomalous within a movement. But if enough people join a club, inevitably, some won’t be straight. “There were gay Nazis,” Downs points out. “But follow where the story leads you: They get massacred.” What seems safe at one moment can be taboo a moment later, and traits that are liabilities in one context can be elsewhere. As recently as 2004, Republicans bragged about opposing gay rights to rally the base, while supporters like John Kerry avoided the topic. Today, longstanding opponents of gay rights are the ones who avoid the question — or set aside long-held beliefs in the name of pragmatism.
“I think gays can be particularly useful to the alt-right,” Alternative Right editor Colin Liddell told me. “Our movement is a revolutionary and taboo-busting movement, and gays have the right ‘psychological equipment’ for that. And, because of their lack of immediate family, gays often have a stronger feeling for their ‘wider family.’ The left has successfully displaced this sentiment to the fake ‘gay community’ or to leftist causes in general, but the true wider family for gays is their particular tribal or ethnic group.”
Donovan seems to be living proof of that theory — but not, perhaps, by choice. When I ask if he’d like to have children, he replies, “If I did, it would be with a woman.” He’s jealous of the “multigenerational experience” that straight couples can have just by fucking. Their DNA becomes entwined, playing out together for generations, even after they’re dead. The tribe lives on. “I’ve been really lucky,” he continues. “The guy I’m with, he’s my family. We just got a dog together, and we’re being gay for the dog.” He laughs. “I’m very lucky and, I think, very unusual in that sense. I think a lot of homosexual men end up being alone. I think it’s very unstable and very lonely. It’s not something that’s — like — if I met a young man who would say, ‘Hey, you know, I’m questioning,’ I’d say, ‘Don’t.’ I would advise them, unless there is no other way, I would say, ‘If you have the choice between men and women, be straight.’”

By 
*A version of this article appears in the May 1, 2017, issue of New YorkMagazine

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