Showing posts with label Christians Against Christ. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Christians Against Christ. Show all posts

September 5, 2018

This Religious Christian Man Thought He Could Deface Art He Doesn't Like_He Learned Otherwise








Benjamin Gittany leaves the Downing Centre Courts, Sydney, Thursday, December 7, 2017.







The Erskineville community wrote messages of support about George Michael and the mural over Gittany's black paint.
 



 

Ben Gittany, 24, was sentenced in the New South Wales Local Court on Tuesday morning after he covered the mural in black paint on November 18, 2017.
The artwork, titled "St George", was painted by artist Scott Marsh in the inner Sydney suburb of Erskineville following Michael's death in December 2016. It depicts the gay rights icon wearing a white robe with a halo around his head while holding a joint.
Gittany, a Christian, claimed he was "defending his religion" as he defaced the mural three days after the same-sex marriage postal survey results were announced. The incident happened a week after another mural by Marsh in a neighbouring suburb, showing Tony Abbott and George Pell in a relationship, had also been defaced.
On November 18 Gittany travelled from his home town near Bathurst to Erskineville, stopping at Bunnings to buy $135 worth of supplies, and proceeded to cover the colourful mural in a thick black layer of paint.
In footage of the incident Gittany can be heard saying "I've done nothing wrong, I'm defending my religion".
To an onlooker who warned he may spend time in prison, Gittany said: "I don't care what happens to me, my religion's more important than me."
"What was left [on the wall] was a large area of black paint which arguably was a disturbing message of rejection to the community and arguably a contempt for other people.
"We are not a community where violence, criminal acts and property destruction are sanctioned because you have different beliefs to other people. They had to look at it for months. It distressed the owner and the community, and it was extensive."
Letters supporting Gittany said he was running a carpentry business and taking responsibility in his family, particularly in his role as an uncle.
"Your conduct contradicts the belief that those around you have in you," Huntsman told Gittany.
A character reference from his sister said he had "travelled away from younger offending behaviour".
"Unfortunately the matter before court doesn’t demonstrate that," Huntsman said.
A pre-sentence report on Gittany said the 24-year-old had shown insight that he could learn to accept life in a religious pluralist society.
He also told the officer who wrote the report that he now realised there were other ways to show his disapproval of the mural, like complaining to the council.
Huntsman ordered Gittany carry out 300 hours of community service, which may include cleaning graffiti, and told him: "Every time you have to spend hours washing damaged walls you can reflect on your own conduct."
He was also ordered to pay $14,000 compensation to the owners of the mural.
"Clearly there’s an incredible amount of black paint on that wall. It needs to be primed, it’s a very tall wall and there is a need for lift hire," Huntsman said. The sum also includes the fee of the artist.
Prosecutors had asked for a further $8,000 to graffiti-proof a re-painted version of the mural, but Huntsman said she could not order that as it was not strictly speaking damage compensation.
After Gittany covered the mural in black paint, people in the community wrote messages on it such as "love wins" and "gotta have faith" in support of the LGBTI community and same-sex marriage.
More than 30,000 people signed an online petition supporting Gittany and claiming the mural incited hate against Christians by invoking religious iconography.

November 13, 2017

Moore to get a Pass from Evangelicals: "Evangelicalism and GOP have lost their credibility and their souls in the pursuit of power"







For many evangelicals, fiery Alabama politician and judge Roy Moore have been a longtime hero. Others have sometimes cringed at his heated rhetoric and bellicose style.

Now, as Moore’s Republican U.S. Senate campaign is imperiled by allegations of sexual overtures to a 14-year-old girl when he was in his 30s, there’s an outpouring of impassioned and soul-searching discussion in evangelical ranks.

“This is one of those excruciating decision moments for evangelicals,” Albert Mohler, president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, said in a telephone interview. “These allegations, if true, are devastating. If true, this is a very big deal.”

Mohler said Alabama voters face a potentially wrenching task of trying to determine if the allegations — Moore has emphatically denied them — are credible.

According to the Pew Research Center, 49 percent of Alabama adults are evangelical Protestants. For some of them, the Moore allegations echo the quandary they faced last year, wrestling over whether to support Donald Trump in the presidential race despite his crude sexual boasts.

The Rev. Robert Franklin, professor of moral leadership at Emory University’s Candler School of Theology in Atlanta, said The Washington Post’s report about the Moore allegations represents a test of “moral consistency” for evangelicals.

“Evangelicals are steadily losing their moral authority in the larger public square by intensifying their uncritical loyalty to Donald Trump,” Franklin wrote in an email. “Since this is Roy Moore and not Donald Trump, I think there may be significant disaffection with him and increased demands for his removal from the ballot.” 



As for Moore himself, Franklin suggested there were “classic evangelical remedies” such as confession, prayer and remorse, and isolation.

“Election to higher office is not one of them,” Franklin wrote.

Although Trump won 80 percent of the white evangelical vote in his presidential victory, his candidacy exposed and hardened rifts among conservative Christians about partisan politics, the personal character of government leaders and the Gospel. Surveys by the Public Religion Research Institute found that the percentage of white evangelicals who said they still trusted the leadership of a politician who commits an immoral act rose from 30 percent in 2011 to 72 percent last year.

Still, a solid minority of conservative Christians adopted the NeverTrump hashtag on social media and joined that outside evangelicalism who said “values voters” had lost their values. Women and black evangelicals especially emerged as critics of Trump’s remarks about women, immigrants, African-Americans and Muslims. Many of these same critics of Trump’s behavior and rhetoric condemned Moore in recent days and bemoaned the fact that some evangelicals were standing by him.


“Okay, seriously, we elected a man president who bragged about using his power and authority to sexually assault women,” tweeted Kyle James Howard, an African-American student at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. “Why are we surprised that members of his party would now be defending a party member’s sexual assault of a minor?”

One of the Southern Baptist Convention’s leading public policy experts, the Rev. Russell Moore, expressed dismay after the allegations against Judge Moore — no relation — surfaced on Thursday.

“Whether in the hills of Hollywood or the halls of power, it doesn’t matter,” the Rev. Moore tweeted. “This is true: sexual assault and child molestation are evil, unjust, satanic.”

Roy Moore embraced controversy as he built his evangelical following. He was twice removed from his post as Alabama’s chief justice, once for disobeying a federal court order to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the lobby of the state judicial building, and later for urging probate judges to defy the U.S. Supreme Court decision legalizing gay marriage.
More and more the cross seems to be showing the blood of opponents than the blood of Christ
 
Among those declining to break with Moore in the wake of the sex allegations was Jerry Falwell Jr., president of evangelical Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia.

“It comes down to a question of who is more credible in the eyes of the voters — the candidate or the accuser,” Falwell told Religion News Service. “And I believe the judge is telling the truth.”

Mohler, the seminary president, said many evangelical Alabama voters will find themselves facing a difficult choice when ballots are cast in the Dec. 12 special election.

“There’s so much at stake,” he said. “Those of us who are pro-life have got to be very concerned about losing even one seat in the U.S. Senate.”

The Democratic candidate in the special election, Doug Jones, has said that a decision on whether to have an abortion should generally be left to the woman in question.

Abortion policy also was evoked by Ed Cyzewski, a Kentucky-based seminary graduate, and author, in a series of Twitter posts Friday questioning why some of his fellow evangelicals would continue to stand by Moore.


“Right now there are evangelicals who feel trapped,” Cyzewski wrote. “They think Moore did something reprehensible, but believe abortion is evil.”

Katelyn Beaty, an editor at large with the evangelical magazine Christianity Today, suggested that among many of Moore’s evangelical supporters, there’s a “presumption of innocence” because of their mistrust of national media such as The Washington Post.

“Many Christian communities have trouble appropriately responding to sex abuse allegations,” Beaty wrote in an email. “There is a default trust in powerful, charismatic male leaders, coupled with a discomfort with women who use their story or voice to challenge the status quo or power structures.” 

However, Beaty said more moderate evangelicals — notably those critical of Trump — were likely dismayed by the allegations against Moore.

“For them, the defense of Moore is another sign that both evangelicalism and the GOP have lost their credibility and their souls in the pursuit of power,” she wrote.

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