Showing posts with label Weight Issues. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Weight Issues. Show all posts

April 7, 2019

23 Yr Old 313 LBS In Nine Months Lost 156 LBS Only Gave Up ONE Thing




                     Image result for Ben Pamment ran out of excuses. The 6-foot New Zealander




At 23 years old, Ben Pamment ran out of excuses. The 6-foot New Zealander found himself weighing in at just over 313 pounds, and experiencing anxiety and depression. Though he suffered a knee injury years earlier, he could no longer think of a reason for being so unhealthy.
But, after “breaking up” with his best friend-sugar-he pulled off a staggering 156-pound weight loss transformation in nine short months, and found himself in a much healthier mental state, too. 
"My life before it all happened had been very difficult,” Pammet told Men's Health. “I was roughly always around the 253-pound mark, so I was always a bigger guy. I just never looked at it that way-as that’s who I always was, and who my friends and family always knew me to be.” 
For Pammet, his “downward spiral” began with that fateful knee injury in his early 20s. He proceeded to use it as an excuse to get out of just about everything in his life. 
“I would sit around and wait for something good to happen to me rather than getting out there and doing something to change the situation,” he said.
This period of waiting for something better to come along lasted for more than two years. In that time, Pammet said he “developed serious anxiety and depression where I basically closed myself off away from the world, and food and sugar became my two best friends.” 
One day, Pammet woke up and simply had enough. He was tired of being alone, without friends, and missing out on a life that was quickly passing him by. The one thing he had to overcome was the fear of his family and friends judging his new larger body. 
“I would avoid family events and going out because they hadn’t seen what I had become through my years of body abuse through bad habits and eating,” he said. 
But this fear ended up being the catalyst to push himself to become the absolute best version of himself. The first step for Pammet was reevaluating his eating habits and changing them for the better.
“It was incredibly hard, and I fell off the wagon a few times, but if you want something enough you will get there,” he said. For him, the biggest challenge was avoiding sugar altogether. (Think it’s easy to cut sugar out of your daily routine? Here’s what really happens to your body when you cut out sugar.) 
Next, he joined a gym. Though he was plagued with an injury and overweight, as an athlete, Pammet knew what to do and set small goals for himself that kept his fitness progressing. He did so through mixing a short interval cardio routine with a weight circuit five days a week. 
Just three weeks into his new lifestyle, Pammet’s mother sent him a photo. In those 21 days, Pammet lost about 22 pounds. And it showed. 
“The change was dramatic,” Pammet explained. “I posted it onto social media, as I was very proud. I was overwhelmed with support and comments and from there onward I felt like I had to keep going not only for myself but others as I’d become a role model and I didn’t want to show everyone I was a quitter.” 
Another benefit of his weight loss was his knee pain slowly subsiding. As he continued to lose weight, the pressure slowly released, and his muscles continued to get stronger. 
“I just had to take it day by day and do things that didn’t put stress on my joint but still giving my body the workout that it needed,” he said. “There were mentally challenging times, too, and times I would go home in tears or wanted to give up. But I always remembered that the bigger picture was the ultimate goal and the feeling I would get when I achieved it.”
And achieve it, he did. In nine short months, Pammet dropped to 162 pounds, marking a 156-pound weight loss. 
"To reach the weight that I have is still crazy to me, as it hasn’t even been a year of my life,” he said. “It feels like I’ve been doing it for years but at the same time, it’s flown past so fast.” 
Now, Pammet said his “whole mental state” has completely changed. He’s now able to share a side of himself he never knew existed with those around him. “My mindset and thought pattern has changed dramatically everything about the mental side has changed, and I’m very positive, where 11 months ago you wouldn’t even whisper the word positive and associate it with me,” he said. 
As for advice he’d give others? “You only get out what you put in," Pammet said.
“If you want something bad enough you will get it,” he added. “Start slow, and set yourself very small goals that you know you can achieve. When you do achieve them, you will feel amazing and continue to set more and more goals. Always keep them realistic and in sight.” 
Now, Pammet said his “whole mental state” has completely changed. He’s now able to share a side of himself he never knew existed with those around him. “My mindset and thought pattern has changed dramatically everything about the mental side has changed, and I’m very positive, where 11 months ago you wouldn’t even whisper the word positive and associate it with me,” he said. 
A s for advice he’d give others? “You only get out what you put in," Pammet said.
“If you want something bad enough you will get it,” he added. “Start slow, and set yourself very small goals that you know you can achieve. When you do achieve them, you will feel amazing and continue to set more and more goals. Always keep them realistic and in sight.”

Men's Health. 

April 11, 2016

Olly Alexander Admits to Having Eating and Body Looks Issues

                                                                                                   





Olly Alexander, the frontman of best-selling pop band Years & Years, has disclosed that he suffered from eating issues and an unhealthy relationship with his body for a decade.
Speaking to BuzzFeed News on Friday during a Facebook Live event just hours before the band’s biggest ever concert at Wembley Arena, the singer described how he battled with a fixation on food from his childhood until his early 20s – as he was also coming to terms with his sexuality, his parents’ divorce, anxiety and depression.
The problems began, he said, aged 10 when he started attending a local gymnastics class: “It was the first time I was starting to have an awareness of my body and strength and [thought], ‘Older boys, they’re really muscly and they could do things that I couldn’t do’ and that’s the point, from then onwards… I started to have body issues and not eating, like I wouldn’t eat.”
He explained: “I was stuck between this place of being really, really, really skinny and hating it – because I wanted to be muscly like other boys – but at the same time didn’t want to put on weight because that was bad as well. I struggled with it for a really long time actually.”
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The issues around eating and body image carried on into early adulthood. “For ten years at least really I would say I struggled with that,” he said, adding that it involved “skipping meals and constantly thinking about food and…obsessing over what I ate and what was going into my body and hating my body in the mirror.”
Going without food, he said, was in part an attempt to feel more in control. Asked by BuzzFeed News whether he would describe his problem as an “eating disorder” he replied: “I wouldn’t want to call it that myself… I was never diagnosed with an eating disorder but I definitely had a difficult relationship with food.”
However, that relationship has improved significantly, he said, thanks to a “good support network” and “years of therapy”: “I’ve looked at some of the causes that have been at the root of why I had not just problems with food but [also] there were links with depression and anxiety, and I’ve started to really unpack some of those things.”
Although he now enjoys a healthier relationship with eating, Alexander stressed that he remains vigilant about it.
“It’s really a life-long process,” he said, “that I think anyone that’s experienced any mental distress or mental illness knows it’s something you manage – it’s not something that just goes away. So it’s an ongoing thing.”
Leon Neal / AFP / Getty Images
Alexander, whose band’s album Communion reached number one last year and who has won Brit and MTV awards, also described the pressure he has exerted on himself.
“I used to, before I went on stage, feel like, ‘I’m a terrible singer, [that] no one’s going to like it, and all these people who bought tickets don’t actually want to be here.’” Thanks to therapy, however, he now adopts a “positive mental attitude”: “I just say to myself you’re going to nail it, you’re gonna be great.”
In a wide-ranging interview – as the rest of the band were preparing for their performance in front of 10,000 fans – Alexander continued with the theme of health and wellbeing, criticising the NHS for not making the drug that prevents HIV more widely available.
Last month, NHS England announced that it would not be rolling out PrEP – a medication regime that uses the drug Truvada to stop people contracting the virus. The announcement sparked widespread anger from HIV charities, doctors and activists.
“It concerned [me] mainly because I feel like it really stigmatised people living with HIV,” said Alexander. “I can’t believe we’re still stigmatising or shaming people that have any sort of sexually transmitted illness but especially HIV because it feeds into this narrative that shames gay men especially, but not just gay men – lots of people get HIV.”
Dimitrios Kambouris / Getty Images
He added: “I don’t understand why anything that’s a preventive drug is not a good thing.” The cost of treating people with HIV far outweighs the cost of the drug that prevents it, he said, but increased discussion about the issue also needs to play a part.
“There needs to be more education and awareness around HIV because it just feels like we’ve gone back a bit, like, ‘It’s not a thing [anymore]’ or, ‘Ooh I’m gonna catch it from looking at you’. Alexander, who said he had no sex education at school, added that it “should be compulsory” for pupils.
The singer, who is gay, also spoke out about the need for schools to educate pupils around sexuality and gender, championing the cause of gender variant, trans and non-binary people – identities that were explored in Years & Years’ video for Desire.
Asked by BuzzFeed News if he had ever questioned his gender identity, Alexander replied: “Oh my god, 100 per cent,” before explaining, “I’m a cis[gender] male, I identify as a man but… I’ve never felt like a masculine male.” Growing up, he said, people called him “girly”. “I was like, ‘Why do I have to be one thing or the other and why is that bad?’ 
I believe there’s a fluidity to all of it really… we still have these quite enforced binary norms in school. It’s a process. But I do think it’s changing… kids are really smart and are much more tolerant and understanding of things that older people aren’t getting.”
Much of this change has come about through social media, he said. “Now we have this platform – all these people who in the past didn’t have a voice at all, now there are other people all round the world who share the same opinions or similar experiences.” He added: “You have a voice now and people have to listen.”
 Patrick Strudwick is the UK LGBT editor for BuzzFeed News and is based in London. 
Contact Patrick Strudwick at patrick.strudwick@buzzfeed.com.

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