Showing posts with label Australia. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Australia. Show all posts

June 29, 2019

Australian Rugby ExStar Israel Folau Go Fund Me Page Closed



Image result for Israel Folau’s anti gay
 "Be what you want to be, no need to put down those different from you. If you do you are nothing but an ignorant punk" Adam
                               

 
When Australian rugby star Israel Folau’s team contract was terminated after he voiced the principles of his Christian faith, he turned to GoFundMe Australia to crowdsource funds for his legal action against Rugby Australia.

Three days later, the popular fundraising platform took down his page with plans to refund all donors. 

“As a company, we are absolutely committed to the fight for equality for LGBTIQ+ people and fostering an environment of inclusivity,” GoFundMe Australia manager Nicola Britton said, according to The Guardian. 

After his fundraising page was shut down, a “non-party partisan, non-denominational” group called Australian Christian Lobby reached out to Folau with the opportunity to host his fundraiser and donated $100,000 to the cause. The fundraiser raised over $1.5 million as of noon Tuesday.

The liberal Left continue to push their radical agenda against American values. The good news is there is a solution. Find out more >>

Folau, a former Wallabies player, had his $4 million contract with the Australian rugby team terminated in early April after he posted a meme on Instagram that reads: “Warning drunks, homosexuals, adulterers, liars, fornicators, thieves, atheists, idolaters, Hell awaits you. Repent! Only Jesus saves.” 

On June 6, Folau’s legal representatives confirmed that he filed a lawsuit with the Australian Fair Work Commission, claiming his contract was unlawfully terminated because of his religious beliefs. 

On June 21, Folau went to Instagram again to post the link to a GoFundMe campaign he had started to fund the lawsuit, soliciting his followers to support his legal battle. He shared that he and his wife, Maria, had already spent $100,000 on his case.

“So far Maria and I have used over $100K of our savings and I am willing to do what it takes for this cause. But to continue I need to prioritise funding for my legal case,” Folau said in the post, adding:  

To those who believe in the right to practise religion without fear of discrimination in the workplace, here is my ask: Stand with me. I’ve put the link in my bio. If you can and choose to donate, thank you from the bottom of my heart and God bless. #standwithizzy

Three days after the Instagram post, GoFundMe Australia removed Folau’s page Monday morning. The page had received $750,000 in pledges as of Sunday night. 

Britton said the page was removed because it violated GoFundMe’s terms of service.

“After a routine period of evaluation, we have concluded that this campaign violates our terms of service,” Britton said to The Guardian.

She added that the crowdsourcing platform exists “to help people help others,” and that “while we welcome GoFundMes engaging in diverse civil debate, we do not tolerate the promotion of discrimination or exclusion.

January 16, 2019

The Gay and Foster Penguin Parents in Australia



SphengicCreditSea Life Sydney Aquarium
                                                                      


SYDNEY, Australia —


 It was a young penguin colony, and all but one of the couples were pretty bad parents.

They would get distracted from their nests, go for a swim or play, and so neglected eggs were getting cold, likely never to hatch. This was normal for inexperienced penguins, and the aquarium managers didn’t worry. Next mating season would be better.

One couple, though, was extraordinary. Not because they were the colony’s only gay penguins, though they were, but because Sphen and Magic looked like they would make great, diligent, careful egg-warming parents. They made the biggest nest, and they sat on it constantly.

Curious, the aquarium managers gave the two males a dummy egg. They took to it. And so then, when a particularly negligent heterosexual penguin couple looked to be leaving an egg exposed (females lay two, but usually only one survives), the aquarium workers figured they would give it to Sphen and Magic. 

In October, that egg hatched. Now the chick of a gay penguin union is waddling around an ice enclosure by the touristy docks in Sydney.

When Sphen and Magic became a couple, Australia had just gone through a bitter battle about whether gay marriage should be legal. The human gay marriage debate had brought out thorny personal and religious tensions. These two diligent Gentoos, unaware of the political heat around their courtship, became a larger symbol for the country. If a penguin colony could figure this out, a human nation certainly could.

Australia is famous for having many dangerous creatures on land and in water: some of the most dangerous snakes and spiders in the world, kangaroos that look like bodybuilders, great white sharks patrolling surfers. Suddenly, though, Australia’s biggest animal celebrities were two gay penguins, which their keepers noticed with pleasure.

“Everyone likes penguins,” said Tish Hannan, the head of penguin supervision at the aquarium. “They’re so cheeky.”

“They’re not like sharks,” said the senior penguin keeper Amy Lawrie, her second in command. “No one’s had a bad experience with a penguin.” 
Penguin keepers cannot say exactly why one penguin chooses another, especially two penguins as different as Magic and Sphen.

Magic, a 3-year-old Gentoo born at the Sea Life Melbourne Aquarium, is excitable and playful. He chases after toys and anything that shines. He greets visitors.

Sphen, who is 6 and from SeaWorld, is taller and has a bigger beak. He’s quieter, more serious and less interested in toys and humans.

But it was clear early on what Sphen and Magic were doing when they met one summer day at Sea Life Sydney Aquarium.

First, as is the Gentoo way, they began to bow to each other.

They brought each other carefully selected pebbles for the nest they hoped to build together. If either had not been interested he would have rejected the pebble, pushing it away with a beak. But each admired the pebbles he was brought.

Ms. Lawrie described it as “consent.” 

“You would see Magic standing in his spot looking for Sphen, and he would call and Sphen would come running over and give Magic a little bow and sing as well,” Ms. Hannan said. “They’ve chosen each other. That’s it. They’re bonded now.”

Others in the colony of 33 penguins were still flirting. Younger birds tend to take a little while to choose their partners.

“They were recognizing multiple different bird calls and bowing to different individuals,” Ms. Hannan said. “We saw none of that behavior from either Sphen or Magic. They weren’t interested in other birds in the colony.”

And so it was no surprise that the two began preparing for an egg.

“We knew they would start picking up stones,” Ms. Hannan said. “And we knew they would build the best nest.”

When they egg came, Sphen and Magic each took turns sitting on it for 28 days.

🥚

The penguin keepers had a discussion.

 Sphen, Magic and Sphengic.CreditCreditSea Life Sydney Aquarium







“We made the decision within the penguin team, and no one was against it,” Ms. Lawrie said. “Any pairs that want to pair up, it’s great.” 
They alerted aquarium leadership that there were going to be two male penguin parents. The aquarium executives embraced it. 
Sphen and Magic, two male penguins at the Sea Life Sydney Aquarium, looked after an egg when a heterosexual penguin couple wasn’t up to the task. The 3-month-old chick will be called Sphengic until it gets a permanent name.Published OnJan. 15, 2019CreditCreditSea Life Sydney Aquarium
The aquarium put out a video of the pair singing to each other. There is a video of them making their pebble nest.

Visitors now come just to see the new gay parents and ask tour guides which were the gay penguins.

There were those who objected to using of the word “gay.”

“The word ‘unnatural’ was used a lot,” said Samantha Antoun, the aquarium’s public relations manager. “People said we shouldn’t call them gay because maybe they’re just friends.”

The penguin keepers said they would bring no politics onto the ice.

“We’re not going to discourage any companionship for our penguins,” Ms. Lawrie said. “Love is love.”

🥚

The first sign of a good Gentoo parent is that they’re able to recognize an egg has hatched and that the chick is slowly breaking its way out. This can take days. Sphen and Magic noticed straight away.

“When it’s got its face out, it can start talking to its parents, and Magic and Sphen recognized this and started singing to the egg before it even hatched,” Ms. Hannan said.

Their chick — for now called Sphengic — was born on a Friday and weighed 91 grams. It was the only chick to have hatched of all the eggs in the colony.

For the first few months of a chick’s life, it stays close to its parents. Sphen and Magic feed and sing to the chick. They tuck it into bed at night. The chick needs to have its head faced toward the parents when it sleeps under them, so parents use their beaks to keep it in proper position.

Like any couple, Sphen and Magic did face challenges, mostly related to their age difference.

“Magic is the younger one, and he would try to pawn off the parental duties in the first couple days,” Ms. Hannan said. “Sometimes he would be like, ‘You feed the chick today’ and hop off and go swimming.”

But slowly he learned to co-parent. When Magic would feed the chick, Sphen would come over and sing to them. 

“He was singing to encourage him,” Ms. Hannan said. “So Magic would know he was doing the right thing.” 

Now the 3-month-old chick is almost fully grown. He, or she, does not have a permanent name yet. Nor does the penguin have a gender. A penguin’s reproductive organs are internal, so gender can only be determined by a blood test at maturity. Orientation and identity are not Sphengic’s most pressing challenges.

One recent morning, Magic was playing with the other members of the colony, and Sphen was minding Sphengic, who is set aside from the colony in a crèche. Another penguin, Rita, came a little too close. Sphen flapped his wings and lightly jabbed at her with his beak. Sphengic, whose personality has yet to develop, was busy eating ice.

Lunch that day would be pilchards and squid.

The penguin keepers said they do not think much about the politics of Sphengic. But they do see that he is inspiring visitors.

“Penguins are born with the ability to raise chicks from start to finish whether they’re male or female, and that’s quite an interesting thought to keep in mind,” Ms. Hannan said. “We’re the same.”

Many of the other penguins are searching for new pairs for another mating season. But Sphen and Magic remain together. Recently, Sphengic began learning to swim. Sphen and Magic padded nearby, ready to dive in.

September 5, 2018

This Religious Christian Man Thought He Could Deface Art He Doesn't Like_He Learned Otherwise








Benjamin Gittany leaves the Downing Centre Courts, Sydney, Thursday, December 7, 2017.







The Erskineville community wrote messages of support about George Michael and the mural over Gittany's black paint.
 



 

Ben Gittany, 24, was sentenced in the New South Wales Local Court on Tuesday morning after he covered the mural in black paint on November 18, 2017.
The artwork, titled "St George", was painted by artist Scott Marsh in the inner Sydney suburb of Erskineville following Michael's death in December 2016. It depicts the gay rights icon wearing a white robe with a halo around his head while holding a joint.
Gittany, a Christian, claimed he was "defending his religion" as he defaced the mural three days after the same-sex marriage postal survey results were announced. The incident happened a week after another mural by Marsh in a neighbouring suburb, showing Tony Abbott and George Pell in a relationship, had also been defaced.
On November 18 Gittany travelled from his home town near Bathurst to Erskineville, stopping at Bunnings to buy $135 worth of supplies, and proceeded to cover the colourful mural in a thick black layer of paint.
In footage of the incident Gittany can be heard saying "I've done nothing wrong, I'm defending my religion".
To an onlooker who warned he may spend time in prison, Gittany said: "I don't care what happens to me, my religion's more important than me."
"What was left [on the wall] was a large area of black paint which arguably was a disturbing message of rejection to the community and arguably a contempt for other people.
"We are not a community where violence, criminal acts and property destruction are sanctioned because you have different beliefs to other people. They had to look at it for months. It distressed the owner and the community, and it was extensive."
Letters supporting Gittany said he was running a carpentry business and taking responsibility in his family, particularly in his role as an uncle.
"Your conduct contradicts the belief that those around you have in you," Huntsman told Gittany.
A character reference from his sister said he had "travelled away from younger offending behaviour".
"Unfortunately the matter before court doesn’t demonstrate that," Huntsman said.
A pre-sentence report on Gittany said the 24-year-old had shown insight that he could learn to accept life in a religious pluralist society.
He also told the officer who wrote the report that he now realised there were other ways to show his disapproval of the mural, like complaining to the council.
Huntsman ordered Gittany carry out 300 hours of community service, which may include cleaning graffiti, and told him: "Every time you have to spend hours washing damaged walls you can reflect on your own conduct."
He was also ordered to pay $14,000 compensation to the owners of the mural.
"Clearly there’s an incredible amount of black paint on that wall. It needs to be primed, it’s a very tall wall and there is a need for lift hire," Huntsman said. The sum also includes the fee of the artist.
Prosecutors had asked for a further $8,000 to graffiti-proof a re-painted version of the mural, but Huntsman said she could not order that as it was not strictly speaking damage compensation.
After Gittany covered the mural in black paint, people in the community wrote messages on it such as "love wins" and "gotta have faith" in support of the LGBTI community and same-sex marriage.
More than 30,000 people signed an online petition supporting Gittany and claiming the mural incited hate against Christians by invoking religious iconography.

August 15, 2018

There Are Out Gay Men In All Aspects of Australian Society Except Sports





By Corbin Middlemas


Australian rules football has always been a big part of my life, but from an early age, I knew I had a conflict with the game.
Corbin Middlemas at the AFL grand final at the MCG in 2017.My earliest childhood memories revolve around footy, from playing in the backyard or going to Subiaco Oval with my family.

I'm privileged enough to broadcast the AFL for ABC Grandstand each week, something I've done since I was a teenager. I work closely with current and former players, as well as other stakeholders in the game.

I'm a big guy with a deep voice that wears a lot of sports tees. I like rap music and having a beer with my mates.
In the most part, I'm your typical sports junkie in their mid-20s.
Except I'm gay
'I never wanted my sexuality to be the first thing people knew'

I have a close group of friends, dating back through high school, work or even our fantasy football league. We share a lot of common interests, except this.
I always dreamed of being a sports broadcaster. As long as I can remember I wanted
 to call play-by-play.

As a high school student, I volunteered my weekends at my local community radio 
station and by 19, I was working full-time with the ABC in my home city.
Interviewing Essendon's Zac Merrett last year … Corbin says he always dreamed of being a sports broadcaster. 

I never wanted my sexuality to be the first thing people knew about me. Having moved cities twice in as many years, the same applied wherever I went.
It's a confusing weight to carry around. It affected my mood and relationships significantly.
I'd regularly go through moments wanting to tell friends, but not wanting to take an awkward detour in conversation.

It took me 24 years to tell my best friend, and less than a year to tell a dozen more people after that, including my family.

By that point, I think most of them suspected as much and were just waiting for me to tell them.
I'm incredibly fortunate to have such a support network.
It's because of that I feel a sense of obligation to tell my story.
'Being gay doesn't make you any less masculine' 

I have a platform to tell young men who don't fit into the norm that's perfectly normal.
Being gay doesn't make you any less masculine.

The discourse around our game matters and it has been unwelcoming to gay people for generations.
Homophobic slurs are commonplace at many sporting clubs around the country. It's a hangover from a bygone era. These slurs are no longer tolerated at workplaces or heard in most social settings.
The suicide rate for gay youths is astronomically high. LGBTI young people aged 16 to 27 are five times more likely to attempt suicide than the broader population.
Dampening the hysteria

Today we see openly gay men in every aspect of Australian life, except on the sporting field.
In 2014, American journalist Jason Whitlock penned a column about the NFL's first openly gay draftee, Michael Sam.

Michael Sam, the first publicly gay player drafted into the NFL, signs autographs.
Michael Sam (right) is "riding a wave, not creating one", American journalist Jason Whitlock said in 2014. 

He wrote: "The sports world no longer promotes change; it reflects it.
"Sam is riding a wave, not creating one."
The premise of Whitlock's article was not to soften the importance of Sam's announcement, but to "dampen the hysteria".

Most people have gay friends, colleagues or family members. Just last year, the country settled its debate on marriage equality.
There has never been a better time for gay people in Australia than today.
But the sports world is playing catch-up to the real world. The trail has already been blazed in other areas of Australian life.

The idea of a gay footballer isn't that big a deal to many people detached from the sports world.
A retired AFL footballer told me last year he suspects those in the locker room don't have an issue with openly gay players, but it's the circus outside that stops players from coming out.
What does that say about us, as the sports media, and as footy fans more broadly?
Corbin Middlemas is a broadcaster for ABC Grandstand.



June 29, 2018

After 3yr Probe Australia Find 27 Men Were Killed Because They were Gay


 🌈

Police in Sydney have admitted that an “ugly”  wave of gay-hate violence led to the murder or suspected murder of 27 men between 1976 and 2000, including some who were thrown off cliffs or slain in parks that were well-known gay beats. 
A three-year investigation into 88 suspicious deaths exposed a dark episode in Sydney’s history, in which the police and judiciary were accused of failing to properly report or investigate the bashing and killing of gay men, whose deaths were sometimes recorded as suicides. 
The horrific violence towards homosexuals peaked during the “moral panic” around the HIV epidemic in the 1980s and 1990s, when up to 20 assaults were occurring daily. Admitting they can “learn from the past”, police in New South Wales investigated 88 deaths and concluded that eight of the men were murdered by homophobic killers and 19 were suspected of links to gay hatred.
The motives for a further 25 killings remain unknown. 
Of the remaining deaths, 34 cases had no evidence of gay-hate bias  and two were removed from the investigation, one due to a lack of records and one because it occurred outside the state of the New South Wales.
Police said they will consider issuing a formal apology to the victims and their families. Some of the killers responsible are believed to be alive and at large. 
“We accept that there were mistakes made,” said Assistant Commissioner Tony Crandell. 
“We accept that we can learn from the past and we can do better. We believe that the community expectation of police today and always is to conduct thorough investigations when it comes to the death of somebody.”
He added: “It’s an ugly part of our history.”
Many of the assaults and deaths occurred at well-known gay beats such as popular beaches and parks, mainly targeting gay men and transgender women. Some of the murder victims were chased or thrown off coastal cliffs. 
Alan Rosendale was attacked in Sydney in 1989
Alan Rosendale was attacked in Sydney in 1989
Recalling being pursued  down a busy Sydney street after being spotted at an inner-city gay beat in 1989, Alan Rosendale said he heard someone shout “there’s one, let’s get him” before a group of men began chasing him. He tripped and was caught by the men: his next memory was waking in hospital.
“I had a broken nose, broken teeth, they bashed me around the head a lot,’ he told Gay Star News.
Mr Rosendale said police made numerous errors in their report, including incorrectly recording his name and birthdate and claiming he was attacked by “skinheads”.
“I was punched and kicked to the ground in an area frequented by homosexuals was all the [police] report said,” he said.
“We all knew they were murders, but they were being reported as suicide. I just thought it would never happen to me."  

November 20, 2017

Some Christians Got Their Love and Hatred in Action After the 'Yes' Vote and Painted The Town





The minority who was driving the hatred and discrimination towards gays, thinking they were a majority Now find themselves scared that the proven majority will behave towards them how they behave towards all. I was reading some of their comments and some say they find them selves scare they will be followed by gays going home. Like if the gay community had their black hearts and the time to be following stupid straights get home. But this is Australia and Me being an American of Latin decent might not understand them. What I do understand is discrimination towards people that their only sin is being born who they are. All we have always asked is equality! The gay community will always be a minority in Australia so this is another way to have an excuse to do what they did after the vote.  Here is an Australian's  writer's account of how it went.            Adam, Publisher

ON Thursday night, 24 hours after the same-sex marriage result, young Christians from the No-voting western half of Sydney took five litres of black paint to Yes-vote heartland, inner-urban Newtown, and painted over an offensive mural of Cardinal George Pell and Tony Abbott engaged in a sex act.
The giant mural depicted the former Prime Minister as a bride with his hand down the topless Cardinal’s rainbow underpants, complete with pubic hair and caption “The Happy Ending”. It was painted on the wall of the Botany View Hotel on Wednesday as a perverse celebration of the 61.6 per cent same-sex marriage ‘Yes’ vote.
Within hours someone had splashed white paint across the wall, obscuring Cardinal Pell’s face.
But it took 28-year-old Maronite Catholic builder, Charbel, to do the job properly.
He and a mate drove to Newtown and proceeded to paint over the mural using a long-handled roller, respectfully leaving the artist’s name intact and choosing a colour that blended in with the rest of the building. He was impervious to abuse from passers-by calling him “fat wog” and “bigot”.



Protesters conduct a religious ceremony to oppose the Scott Marsh mural that has since been painted over in Newtown. (Pic: Danny Casey/AAP)

And then on Friday night, to the horror of locals, a group of 30 Christians from the western suburbs turned up with rosary beads and incense to pray the “Hail Mary” next to the painted-out mural.
“This mural was a direct attack on Christians or anyone who believes in a god,” says Charbel.
“This is homosexual activists saying we are here, we are loud and strong and when you oppose us we’ll accuse you of hate and not being reasonable and acceptable. What I want to know is, where’s our acceptance?”
This is the cry of the four in ten Australian who voted No and are being treated now like outcasts by gloating Yes campaigners, chief among them the Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.
In his triumphalist speech when the result was announced, the PM lauded the 7.8 million Australians “who voted yes for fairness”.
But he barely acknowledged the 4.8 million Australians who voted No, not because they believe in unfairness, but because they are concerned about the consequences of such a profound change to our foundational social institution. He said nothing to allay their fears.
All he said was: “I know a minority obviously voted no. But we are a fair nation.”
To be fair, he deserves credit for sticking with his election promise to hold a plebiscite, and he has been vindicated with an extraordinary participation rate of almost 80 per cent.
Same-sex marriage has been legitimised by the mandate of the majority, and those of us who were on the losing side accept the result in good faith.


But Turnbull assured us during the campaign that he believed in religious freedom “even more strongly” than in same-sex marriage.
And now social conservatives find themselves disenfranchised and unprotected.
Last week they were being ridiculed for trying to protect basic freedom of expression, association, thought, conscience or religion, and for upholding the right of parents to ensure the education of their children is in accordance with their beliefs.
Crikey accurately described the “general hilarity” that greeted Senator James Paterson’s serious effort to craft a bill that balances competing rights when same sex marriage becomes law. Ignored was his 35,000-word explanatory memorandum containing 19 examples from countries where people have been persecuted for holding a traditional view of marriage, from the Irish baker, the Canadian law school and the British adoption agency to the Washington florist, the Sydney GP and the Tasmanian bishop.
According new rights to one minority should not leave another minority vulnerable and afraid that they will be persecuted for deeply held beliefs.
This is why treasurer Scott Morrison, who was the first politician to advocate a plebiscite, in June 2015, has intervened now to insist on amendments to the marriage bill to protect basic freedoms.
“There are over four million people that voted no in this survey who are now coming to terms with the fact that on this issue, they are a minority.
“They have concerns that their broader views and their broader beliefs are also now in the minority and therefore under threat. And they are seeking assurances that… the things that they hold dear are not under threat also because of this change.”
If Morrison, and those valiant Liberal MPs who still believe in freedom, don’t prevail, the gulf between No-voting Australia and Yes-voting Australia will tear our society apart in ways we can’t even imagine.
**********************************************************************
WITHIN hours of the same-sex marriage announcement on Wednesday, an outspoken No voter who owns a beauty salon in Perth was floored by a gay wedding request.
Belinda received a booking inquiry on her salon’s Facebook page from gay couple Brad and Chris for “a full body wax to make our honeymoon extra special”.
“My partner Chris and I have started planning our big day for Jan now the vote thing is over, So excited!”
Belinda, who is afraid to use her real name, is certain she is being trolled by gay activists.
“It’s not genuine. They know I’m an active No voter and they think they can goad me…
“Are they going to turn up at the shop tomorrow? Where do I stand now if there are people out there deliberately trying to force me to participate in gay weddings?”


Message sent to a Perth beauty salon owned by an outspoken No voter in the wake of the same sex marriage survey. The owner believes she is being trolled by activists.

Belinda says her Catholic faith prevents her from endorsing a gay wedding.
“But I’ve been in business 15 years and I have heaps of gay clients. I have no problem with gay people but I need a safeguard from crazy people.”
In other countries where gay marriage exists, activists have targeted conscientious objectors, florists, bakers and innkeepers who don’t want to service gay weddings.
Labor, the Greens and like-minded Liberals insist the rights of No voters need no protection, but Belinda’s dilemma is just the start.


By



November 16, 2017

How A Gay Killing Changed Australia






Dr George Duncan
CRIMESTOPPERS
Image captionDr. George Duncan was 41 when he drowned in Adelaide in 1972

We saw how the killing of Milk in California had an impact in that state but also the country. The same for Martin L.King and the Kennedy's. These people were killed because they were out front with their beliefs and were honest about how they wanted change. Before them, no one had said the same things in public which caused some people's intelligence to be blinded by their hatred. If intelligence was playing its role instead of hate towards gays and blacks they would have realized that what they were trying to quiet was now getting a megaphone everywhere. Killers of ideas are either just plain ignorant or so blinded by hate they can't see ahead of their killings what is going to do to what these victims/heroes were saying. 
Nothing like the spotlight to bring out the dirt and corruption on those paid to destroy corruption and enforce fairness towards all. Some people, particularly in institutions with lots of power, get the idea their jobs is to prosecute, not to find the defective link and bring it to the justice through the system of Courts, lawyers and prosecutors. 
Just recently you had a cam showing cops in Los Angeles CA. putting drugs in a man's wallet to have an excuse to arrest him. What was going through their minds? Who is ultimately responsible? We are because we elect the politicians that give the police their guns and shields and more important their training. Many times training is rushed through because they want to fill vacancies quick other times not enough importance is given how the police are supposed to enforce and never prosecute or punish an individual. We see that the worse the crime the better those perps get treated. Why? The spotlight is on them and is a pity that there is very little light to see what cops do on their shifts: For instance, in NYC the police is allowed to turn off their new given cams. Right from the start, a new program to safeguard the cop and the public is blinded by having a policy taken over by bad one. We put a band on it so it can't see. They confuse good public relations by seeing the cams but we don't know if they are working or not. This is something I could not do working in an office in midtown. I was on live video from the time I came into the time I left minus bathroom breaks. What was  I guarding? Tests which is important but is not life-saving nor life taking nor reputation squasher.      Adam Gonzalez🦊

On Wednesday, Australia learned the result of a national vote that showed decisive support for legalizing same-sex marriage. The discussion over changing the law has been one of the most hotly debated issues in the nation's recent social and political history.
But the death of a university lecturer in Adelaide 45 years ago led to an even more fundamental change for Australia's gay community. Jamie Duncan reports.
In the foyer of the University of Adelaide's law faculty building, a photograph of a sober-looking man wearing dark-rimmed glasses stares out at posters backing a "yes" vote on Australia's same-sex marriage postal survey.
The scene is a symbol of evolving social debate in Australia. The photograph below is part of a memorial to Dr. George Duncan, a gay law lecturer at the university who is 1972 was killed a stone's throw away at a riverbank in an attack suspected to have been committed by police officers.
The crime, still unpunished, revolted mainstream Australia and led the state of South Australia (SA) to become the first national jurisdiction to decriminalize homosexuality.

Tragic return

Dr. Duncan, born in London in 1930, moved to Melbourne with his parents at seven.
He studied classical philology at the University of Melbourne but did not complete the course because he contracted tuberculosis in 1950. Later, Dr. Duncan earned degrees in arts and law at St John's College, Cambridge, before completing a Ph.D. at the University of Bristol.
A practicing Anglican, he returned to Australia to lecture in law at the University of Adelaide, starting on 25 March 1972.
Less than two months later, Dr. Duncan was dead. He was 41. In 1970s Adelaide, homosexuality was illegal and the southern bank of the River Torrens in the heart of the city was a well-known meeting spot for gay people.
The bank drops sharply below tree-lined Victoria Drive, the northern boundary of the University of Adelaide. It's out of sight from homes north of the river and riverside paths were deserted at night.
Around 23:00 on 10 May 1972, a gang of men confronted Dr. Duncan and another man, Roger James, on the southern bank, near a footbridge.
Both men were thrown into the water but Dr. Duncan could not swim and drowned.
Mr. James suffered a broken ankle in the attack. He crawled up to Victoria Drive. A passing motorist took him to hospital. He later refused to identify the attackers.
Shortly after police retrieved Dr. Duncan's body, a TV news crew arrived. Incredibly, police placed the body back in the river and dragged it out again for the camera. 
In the days following his death, rumors began circulating that members of the police vice squad were responsible, but witnesses feared for their lives.
South Australian Premier Don Dunstan offered protection for anyone who came forward. No-one did.

Case gathers profile

A coroner's inquest began on 7 June 1972, at which two members of the vice squad refused to answer questions. They and a third detective were suspended and later resigned.
A 1972 newspaper report on the death of Dr George Duncan, also showing a coroner and police chiefs, none of whom were suspected in the death
 A 1972 newspaper front page. No-one pictured was suspected in Dr. Duncan's death
By then, the case, the possibility of police involvement and a broader discussion about attitudes to homosexuality were making headlines around Australia.
Amid the charged political atmosphere, Mr. Dunstan authorized police to call in detectives from New Scotland Yard.
Meanwhile, Murray Hill, a lawmaker, tabled a bill in the state's ultra-conservative Legislative Council to decriminalize homosexual activity between consenting adult men.
It was drafted by two junior solicitors - his son, Robert, and colleague John Cummins.
Robert Hill, later an Australian government minister, said the bill was his father's reaction to a discriminatory law that by 1972 lagged well behind community values. 
"I guess it surprised some people because in many ways [Murray Hill] was a quite conservative chap, but he was progressive in others, particularly in anti-discrimination," Robert Hill told the BBC.
The bill passed, but further amendments later in 1972 destroyed its intent.
Mr. Hill said the public reaction to Dr. Duncan's death was strong. 
"It started a debate about how the police were behaving in relation to homosexuals around the Torrens," Mr. Hill said, adding that suspicion of police involvement increased over time.
"And it added some momentum to the debate about decriminalization. It had started before at a fairly low tempo, but when the public became aware of what happened disbelief turned to anger and general community anger pushed the debate along."
Community disquiet spread around Australia as gay rights rallies in the big cities pushed for reform. 
The inquest found that Dr. Duncan died from violence inflicted by unknown persons. A subsequent police investigation also failed to identify suspects.



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A memorial plaque was erected at the top of the riverbank beside the footbridge to mark the 30th anniversary of Dr Duncan's death.
 A memorial plaque erected near the river to mark the 30th anniversary oDr. Duncan's death


The case revealed the previously little-known practice among a few police officers of terrorizing gay men by the Torrens. Mr. Hill said the brutality made the general public uncomfortable.
In October 1972, the British detectives called into the case delivered their final report, which was never released, and the SA Crown Solicitor decreed no charges would result, further fuelling the case for change and turning Dr. Duncan into a symbol for gay rights advocates.
A second decriminalization bill introduced by another lawmaker, Peter Duncan, was defeated twice, but the same bill passed in 1975.
It was far from the end of the matter.

'Cover-up'

In July 1985, a former vice squad member, Mick O'Shea, told an Adelaide newspaper that there had been a cover-up to protect three other squad members who he said killed Dr Duncan.
In February 1986, the three were charged with his manslaughter. Only two faced trial, and in September 1988 both were acquitted. A police taskforce on the case was disbanded in 1990 with no prospect of identifying other suspects.
Decriminalisation of male homosexuality had passed in all states and territories bar one by 1990. Tasmania clung to its anti-homosexual laws until May 1997 - passed only when gay activists threatened a court challenge to the laws.
Long-time gay rights activist and same-sex marriage campaigner Rodney Croome were at the heart of the fight in Tasmania.
He said Dr. Duncan is an inspiration for gay rights.
"For people like me who became part of the movement for decriminalization a generation after that, it was a pivotal moment in that historical narrative that we all became a part of," Mr. Croome told the BBC.
"It was often cited by people from that earlier generation - not just people from Adelaide, but people from all over Australia - as a turning point, a key moment that revealed the depth of our oppression and the need for our emancipation." Mr Croome said he sees parallels between broad support for decriminalizing homosexuality following Dr. Duncan's death and the same-sex marriage debate in Australia today. 
But he believes the political debate is vastly different, believing that there is an "element that sees empathy as weakness and refuses to empathize with LGBTI people, instead wanting to portray us as aggressors, and a threat to democracy and civilization."
Opponents of same-sex marriage in Australia's debate have consistently argued that they are protecting traditional values and religious freedoms. Anti-reform lobby groups have said changing the law could have negative consequences for children.
Mr. Hill said today's same-sex marriage debate is also a fight for equality, but the 1970s debate was colored by Dr. Duncan's horrific death and the fact that harmless acts between consenting men were considered criminal.
"You can argue that same-sex marriage is a further progressive reform, but I think it was a fundamentally different sort of debate, and I think the horrific story of what happened to Dr. Duncan played a key part in contributing to almost a demand that the law change," he said.
SA Police still offers an A$200,000 (£120,000; $150,000) reward for information leading to a conviction in the case.
Author Jamie Duncan and Dr. George Duncan are not related.

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