Showing posts with label Teacher. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Teacher. Show all posts

June 26, 2019

Cathedral Catholic High School Succumbs To Pressure From Bishop and Fires Their Last Gay Teacher

Then-Bishop Charles Thompson speaks after he is introduced as the new archbishop of Indianapolis in Indianapolis June 13, 2017.
Then-Bishop Charles Thompson speaks after he is introduced as the new archbishop of Indianapolis in Indianapolis June 13, 2017.


 This was not a case of parents no liking this teacher or students or the fculty. A well respected teacher that happened to be gay. So you fix your dogma to be real Christian or you continue to get church laws adopted by bishops and popes (Men) that are now dead. Or you fix it for the ones thayt are live to day and tomorrrosw. You quote your god Jesus Christ and not passages that had nothing to do with Christianity and "going against these" is going againt me. Jchrist


Indianapolis, Indiana—The Indianapolis archbishop has forced a Catholic high school to fire a gay teacher, just days after another school in the city defied a similar order despite church officials saying they would no longer recognize it as Catholic. The contrasting responses by Cathedral High School and Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School to orders by the Indianapolis Archdiocese demonstrate they ways LGBT Catholics are experiencing workplace pressure without federal laws ensuring nationwide nondiscrimination protections. 

Cathedral High School announced Sunday that it's terminating the teacher's contract to avoid a split with the archdiocese. Leaders of Cathedral High School, a private school affiliated with the Brothers of the Holy Cross religious order, said in a letter on the school's website that disobeying Archbishop Charles Thompson would cost the school its nonprofit status and its ability to have Mass celebrated on campus.

"Archbishop Thompson made it clear that Cathedral's continued employment of a teacher in a public, same-sex marriage would result in our forfeiting our Catholic identity due to our employment of an individual living in contradiction to Catholic teaching on marriage," the school statement said.
This is the third Indianapolis Catholic high school that's faced pressure from Thompson over employees in same-sex marriages since he became archbishop in July 2017. CBS News reported earlier this month that Archdiocesan-operated Indianapolis Roncalli High School has fired or suspended two female guidance counselors in the past year because they're both in same-sex marriages. Both women have filed federal employment discrimination complaints. 
  
Then-Bishop Charles Thompson speaks after he is introduced as the new archbishop of Indianapolis in Indianapolis June 13, 2017.
On Friday, Thompson issued a decree against Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School because it employed a teacher in a same-sex marriage. Brebeuf leaders said the teacher was a "longtime valued employee" who didn't teach religion. The archdiocese maintained that it considers all teachers, guidance counselors and school administrators to be ministers who must follow church teaching.

CBS News reported earlier in June a statement from the Very Rev. Brian Paulson, who heads the Midwest Province of Jesuits, who said that "Brebeuf's administration and Board of Trustees have determined that following the Archdiocese's directive would not only violate their informed conscience on this particular matter, but also would set a concerning precedent for future interference in the school's operations and other matters."

Indiana is among about 30 states without state nondiscrimination laws protecting LGBT people, according to the gay-rights group Human Rights Campaign. A federal bill for such nationwide nondiscrimination protections passed the House of Representatives in May but appears doomed in the U.S. Senate because of Republican opposition.

New Ways Ministry, a Maryland-based advocacy group for LGBT Catholics, counts nearly 100 employees at Catholic institutions who've lost jobs because of sexual orientation issues across the country in the past decades.

Cathedral administrators said Sunday that its decision to dismiss a gay teacher was "agonizing" but one that was necessary for the 1,100-student school. Cathedral, like Brebeuf, had been in talks with the archdiocese about the teachers for nearly two years. Neither school has identified the teachers involved

The Cathedral letter doesn't defend Thompson's decision, saying it hopes the action does not "dishearten Cathedral's young people." The actions have sparked online petitions and social media debate.

The archdiocese said in a statement Monday that all Catholic schools have been directed to state in employment contracts that all employees must support church teachings.

"This issue is not about sexual orientation; rather, it is about our expectation that all personnel inside a Catholic school — who are ministers of the faith — abide by all Church teachings," the statement said. "If and when a minister of the faith is publicly not doing so, the Church calls us to help the individual strive to live a life in accordance with Catholic teaching."

Brebeuf is operated by the Midwest Province of Jesuits, independently of the archdiocese. Despite Thompson's decree, Brebeuf's principal says it will continue to call itself an "independent Jesuit Catholic school."


September 28, 2018

One Week After Coming Out Gay Zimbabwe Teacher Quits After Death Threats




Picture of Neal HovelmeierImage copyright



 
Image captionHe wanted to address the issue of homophobia in the school

A gay teacher at a top Zimbabwean boys' school has resigned after death threats and pressure from parents. 
Neal Hovelmeier, deputy head for St John's College's sixth form, came out to his students last week. 
He was encouraged to do so as a Zimbabwean newspaper was planning on outing Mr Hovelmeier, the school's chairman wrote in a letter. 
Some parents threatened legal action against him in a country where homosexual acts are illegal.  
"I will not submit myself to a sham trial," Mr Hovelmeier wrote in his resignation letter. 
The teacher, who has worked in the elite school for 15 years, apologised for the distress caused by revealing his sexuality, saying it has since led to "death threats as well as threats of physical danger to myself and my pets". 
"I have come to realise that my current position as deputy headmaster is now untenable," he wrote in the resignation letter. 
Mr Hovelmeier came out to the student body on 21 September when the school, which is based in the capital Harare, released a statement by him. 
He wrote that former students had confided to him that they had felt intimidated and ostracised at the school amidst a homophobic atmosphere. 
He said he could only deal with the issue if he was "open and transparent about it myself".

Presentational grey line

The emotive issue of homosexuality in Zimbabwe

By Shingai Nyoka, BBC Africa, Harare
The issue of gay rights has always been both controversial and emotive within Zimbabwe's conservative society.
It was one of the most contentious matters as a new constitution - adopted in 2013 - was being drawn up. The majority of Zimbabweans appeared to support the continued outlawing of homosexual acts - and a clause banning same-sex marriage was added to the country's laws.
Zimbabwe's gay community is small and largely operates underground. Secret gay bars do exist and the Gay and Lesbians Association of Zimbabwe (Galz) is formally registered and recognised as a civil society group, but in the past it has been raided by police. 
Former President Robert Mugabe was most outspoken against gay rights, describing gay people as "worse than pigs and dogs". Other government ministers have been at pains to say that no person should be denied healthcare, or have their children lose access to education, because of their sexuality.
More recently when asked whether he would champion gay rights, Mr Mugabe's successor, President Emmerson Mnangagwa, said a constitution voted for by the people was in place, hinting that amidst the myriad challenges facing the country, the issue was not a priority.

Presentational grey line

The move was applauded by rights activists, but also led to uproar among some of the parents. 
Footage of an emergency parents' meeting on 24 September showed participants angrily shouting at one another. 
On the same day, the school's chairman Charles Msipa released a letter to the parents. 
He took responsibility for Mr Hovelmeier coming out to the school, saying their hand was forced as a newspaper planned on revealing the teacher's sexuality. 
Mr Msipa thought it was in the college's best interest if Mr Hovelmeier "communicate directly to stakeholders in an open, transparent manner".
"The publication of the story in the Daily News newspaper of Saturday September 22 was based on the management communication of the matter - rather than conjecture and rumours," Mr Msipa wrote.  The following day, a law firm hired by some of the parents threatened legal action against the school if its board did not resign, according to a letter by the firm seen by the BBC.
It said the teacher's decision to come out "has no place whatsoever in a school environment where they are minors, who look up to your staff as their life models as they exercise their role". 
They also cited the country's Section 73 criminal law that criminalises gay sex, and said that their clients therefore reserved "a right to place criminal charges against your staff member". 
The British curriculum boys school was founded in 1986 and admits boys from the age of 12 to 18, its website says.

September 27, 2018

Sounds Like The A-Bomb Exploded in Zimbabwe After A Teacher Comes Out Gay


Image result for Zimbabwean high school teacher has triggered a furore after coming out






Harare - A Zimbabwean high school teacher has triggered a furore after coming out to students and parents as gay to pre-empt a newspaper story that would have outed him. Neal Hovelmeier, a teacher at the private St John's College in Harare, and headmaster Cavaliere Corrado Trinci wrote a letter revealing his homosexuality to parents after announcing it during assembly at the boys only school.

Homosexuality is illegal in Zimbabwe. St John's College made the disclosure after the independent Daily News sent in media questions about the teacher. 

Hovelmeier said he made the decision in the hope it would curb homophobic behaviour after some former pupils who had gained confidence after school to pursue their sexual orientation told him how they had “intolerance, intimidation and homophobia" while at St John's.
The 6th form teacher’s admission sparked heated debate countrywide and on social media, which some critics saying the school should not have assembled pupils to make the disclosure.

{The tweets were so full of ignorance based homophobia and discredited Anti gay ideas.


In a Twitter polls asking participants if they would be happy with Hovelmeier teaching their sons, over 6 500 or 52 percent voted ‘no’, compared to 36 percent who said ‘yes’ and 12 percent who were ‘undecided’.

"I don’t have a problem with him being gay. I just think that he didn’t have to assemble children and announce that he is gay," Twitter user Kudzai Mutisi posted on the network. "Parents will take this as an attempt to influence their kids. After all, these kids look up to him.”
During a meeting at the school on Monday, angry parents demanded that all officials involved in the debacle quit – including headmaster Trinci, Hovelmeier, second deputy headmaster Andrew Sakala and Charles Msipa, chairman of the school’s board of governors. 

As tempers flared, fistfights broke out among some parents, while others had to be restrained from assaulting school officials.

In a statement, Msipa took full responsibility over the matter, saying he had taken legal advise after the Daily News enquiry and had been advised to run ahead of the story.  
Msipha said he had approved the release of the communication without board approval because the publication of the story appeared imminent. 

"On a personal level, it is my respectful view that the college should continue to strive to provide a safe, caring, inclusive, diverse and tolerant environment and space for all persons regardless of race, religious beliefs, gender, sexual orientation, abilities or disabilities," Msipa added.

Zimbabwe is a deeply conservative country, with Christianity the dominant religion, and homosexuality is generally frowned u

His successor Emmerson Mnangagwa -- who has been careful not to upset Western countries as he struggles with a legitimacy question over his rule after a disputed July 30 election -- has avoided expressing a personal opinion, only saying he is guided by the Constitution whenever the question arises.

African News Agency/ANA 

May 10, 2018

LGBT Teacher Is Suing The Mansfield Tx School District for Sexual Discrimination



March 16, 2018

Swampscott, MA. Principal Fired After Coming Out as Transgender

  
SWAMPSCOTT, MA (WHDH) - A Swampscott Elementary School principal has been let go after coming out as transgender.
Principal Shannon Daniels, formerly Tom, was put on paid administration leave for the remainder of the school year and then her contract was not renewed.
School officials say the decision was made before Daniels announced he would be transitioning to female.
The superintendent of the school says many parents made complaints about Daniels’ teaching methods prior to the announcement.

September 18, 2015

Fired Russian Teacher Gets Support from Gays in St.Petersburg (Vid.)



                                                                     


In November, Anastasia was a well-respected teacher giving music classes at a school for disabled children in St. Petersburg.

By December, she was unemployed and battling a nervous breakdown, her teaching career in tatters.

The young woman, who gives her name only as Anastasia, was fired from her job after being exposed as homosexual by an antigay activist.

"I couldn't understand why I was being dismissed, because I hadn't done anything wrong, I hadn't violated any laws," she tells RFE/RL. "I don't shout about my [sexual] orientation at the top of my lungs, I don't go around carrying a banner. I just live my life, I work, I play music, that's all."

Anastasia's plight underscores what gay-rights activists say is deeply entrenched homophobia in Russia, where a controversial law banning the promotion of "nontraditional sexual relations" has been in place since 2013.

A poll released by the independent Levada Center in May showed that a majority of Russians either despise, are irritated by, or are suspicious of sexual minorities. Thirty-seven percent of respondents said they perceived homosexuality as a disease, and another 18 percent said homosexuals should be prosecuted.

Rights campaigners have criticized the antigay law as an attempt to further marginalize Russia's already-embattled lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community.

At the same time, they argue that the legislation has spurred Russian homosexuals to take a bolder stand, disproving recent claims by Vitaly Milonov, a notoriously homophobic St. Petersburg lawmaker, according to whom all gays have been "squeezed out" of the city. 

Milonov, who has suggested that gay people "rape kids," was the driving force behind the legislation.

Shaking The System

Anastasia herself was summoned by her school director after he received photographs showing her embracing her girlfriend. The pictures, collected from her private account on a social-networking site, were sent to the school by a Russian antigay activist who claims to have "outed" more than 30 teachers across the country.

In a letter posted online, the activist called Anastasia "a sick lesbian teacher who presents psychiatric abnormalities."

Fearing a scandal, the school director demanded that she immediately resign from her job on the grounds that her homosexuality made her unfit to have any contact with children. He also reportedly told Anastasia that people like her "should be burned at the stake."

After her refusal to step down, she was swiftly fired for "immoral behavior" -- a phrasing that effectively puts an end to her teaching career in Russia.

Anastasia, however, is determined to restore her professional standing and right what she feels is a stinging injustice. She has sued her school at a court in St. Petersburg and, after losing her case, filed an appeal with the Supreme Court. A decision is pending.

Anastasia has since unwittingly become a gay-rights activist. She says she is contacted almost every day by Russians pushed out of their jobs for being gay. "It's not so much the school I'm fighting as the politics," she says. "I want to shake this system, even just a little bit. I want to give hope to those who are being forced to resign."

Not 'Squeezed Out'

As pointed out by Milonov, several leading gay-rights campaigners have indeed left St. Petersburg for the safety of Europe. But they, too, insist that their departures don't herald the demise of the gay-rights movement in St. Petersburg and beyond.

"The country doesn't belong to Milonov," says Irina Fedotova-Fet, a prominent LGBT campaigner who moved to Luxemburg several weeks ago. "There are many Russian activists, including young ones who are flourishing, fighting, and taking action. I'm not handing the country over to Milonov, I'm simply giving way to the younger generation."

Fedotova-Fet chose to leave after being badly beaten up close to her home in downtown Moscow last month. A photo posted on her Facebook account shortly after the assault shows her face beaten and bleeding. 

Fedotova-Fet has now applied for political asylum in Luxembourg. After a decade fighting for more tolerance of sexual minorities in Russia, she says she has “done her bit." 

                                                                       
t. Petersburg legislator Vitaly Milonov (right) was awarded a medal last week by President Vladimir Putin for "service to the Fatherland."

St. Petersburg legislator Vitaly Milonov (right) was awarded a medal last week by President Vladimir Putin for 
St. Petersburg legislator Vitaly Milonov (right) was awarded a medal last week by President Vladimir Putin for "service to the Fatherland."
"I fought as long as I could," she says. "When I could no longer fight, I left."

A number of LGBT rights groups currently operate in St. Petersburg, including Vykhod, the Coalition for Civil Equality Together, the Russian LGBT Network, and Side by Side, Russia's first LGBT film festival.

Vykhod says a new generation of activists determined to face down intolerance is emerging in the city. In May, they were able to convince local authorities to let them march at St. Petersburg's May Day parade, an unprecedented victory for Russian homosexuals and one of the few gay-rights rallies whose participants didn't end up being assaulted.

Hundreds of people joined the LGBT march, carrying banners with slogans including "We were, we are, we will be."

Milonov was there, too, shouting slurs at the marchers and waving the flag of the pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine. "Let me rip his head off!" he shouted, pointing at one marcher. 


Activists, in turn, handed out lollipops of Milonov's face with a speech bubble saying, "Don't suck in St. Petersburg!"

Some of the march's organizers chose to sue Milonov for his comments at the rally.

Aleksei, 23, became active with LGBT rights groups last fall and was one of the march's organizers. A court in St. Petersburg is scheduled on September 23 to hear his lawsuit against Milonov, who faces charges of discrimination, hooliganism, libel, and incitement to hatred. "If we want things to change, such actions must not go unpunished," Aleksei tells RFE/RL.

Aleksei acknowledges that some prominent Russian gay-rights campaigners have moved abroad over the past year, but he says LGBT discrimination was not their sole motive to leave Russia.

“One person leaves," he says, "several others take his place."

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