Showing posts with label Terrorist. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Terrorist. Show all posts

October 30, 2019

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi May Be is No More But What Happens Now


In Iraq and Syria, news of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi's death has stirred a mix of responses — from joy to disbelief to dread.

Since President Trump announced this weekend that Baghdadi died during a U.S. military operation in Syria, analysts have been grappling with the implications for the militant organization that has now lost its main chief in addition to all the territory it once held in Iraq and Syria. 

 
But in the lands that were under ISIS rule, conspiracy theories are swirling. While many are happy that the man behind much suffering is dead, residents are questioning the details the U.S. has offered about Baghdadi's demise and whether he died at all. Some even wonder if he ever existed, suggesting how deep distrust of the U.S. government may run in this part of the world.

"First [President George W.] Bush came and said he killed Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, then [President Barack] Obama came and he said he killed [Osama] bin Laden, now this one comes saying he killed Baghdadi. Every president kills one," says Zekko Zuhair, a pet store owner in Mosul, Iraq.


People walk near Mosul's heavily damaged Al-Nuri Mosque. Baghdadi used the site in 2014 to announce the launch of a caliphate. 
Zaid al-Obeidi/AFP via Getty Images

Mosul is where, in 2014, the ISIS leader declared himself "caliph," claiming to be a successor to a historical Muslim figure. Baghdadi later went into hiding, while ISIS went on a rampage across Iraq and Syria, imposing its extreme interpretation of Islamic law, recruiting members from around the world to help slaughter civilians, soldiers, and rival militants; take hostages for ransom; and women and girls as sex slaves. 
 
Much of Mosul is still recovering from ISIS' three-year reign, and from the destruction left by U.S.-backed forces battling the militants. Many families have relatives who were killed either by ISIS fighters or during the fierce fighting against them.

Mahmoud Saeed, a local imam, says he recalls the day Baghdadi came to the city surrounded by bodyguards and declared the start of the caliphate from the pulpit of al-Nuri Mosque.


Ruins where Baghdadi declared the caliphate six years ago. ISIS blew up the mosque in the battle for Mosul before it was driven out of the area in 2017.
Jane Arraf/NPR
"We did not choose him," Saeed says.

Still, even after news of his death, Saeed and friends have been discussing whether Baghdadi was really invented by the U.S.

'The Old City Will Come Back Better': Residents Of Mosul Return And Rebuild 
WORLD
'The Old City Will Come Back Better': Residents Of Mosul Return And Rebuild
When asked who the man really was, Saeed says: "We don't know — ask America. Ask Donald Trump."

Mosul resident Marwa Khaled is with her 5-year-old son Mohaiman, who's holding a plastic toy rifle almost as big as he is. Mohaiman never met his father, a police officer who was killed by ISIS.

"I'm happy but I'm not sure about the news," Khaled says. "We didn't see a body, we didn't see anything." 
President Trump announced on Sunday Baghdadi had died during a U.S. military operation in northwest Syria the night before.
 
According to Trump, as U.S. special forces attacked the compound where Baghdadi was hiding out, the ISIS leader ran into a dead-end tunnel and detonated a suicide vest that killed him and three children.

Trump said he is considering making some of the footage of the raid public "so that [Baghdadi's] followers and all of these young kids that want to leave various countries, including the United States, they should see how he died. He didn't die a hero. He died a coward."

In spite of Trump's claims of victory over ISIS, Baghdadi's death does not represent the end of the group, says Mansour Marid, the governor of Nineveh, Iraq.

"This is only one page of the situation, and we presume there is another page to it," says Marid. "The important thing is to end the ideology, otherwise with these kinds of men, one leader goes, another will come in his place." 
Next door in Syria, many residents who spent years under ISIS rule say they're thrilled Baghdadi is dead.

"It's very happy news ... because it feels like he's a personal enemy," says Mohammed Kheder, who leads a group of Syrian researchers documenting ISIS atrocities called Sound and Picture. "ISIS committed numerous crimes against our sons. ... The person responsible for the death of their sons has died." 

Kheder adds that families feel like "they have gotten their revenge, even if it's from someone who's also responsible for many deaths of their sons." The someone he's referring to is the U.S.-led coalition that defeated ISIS but used overwhelming firepower, which rights groups say killed many more civilians than it did ISIS fighters. "People believe one criminal killed another criminal," he says.

This attitude doesn't surprise Jeremy Shapiro, who worked on Syria policy at the State Department under the Obama administration. "People in that area are pretty jaded about the United States. The fact that they are not sad that Baghdadi is dead isn't going to change their opinion of us," Shapiro says.

In March, U.S.-led forces drove ISIS fighters out of their last held territory in Syria. Now thousands of suspected ISIS fighters are in prisons in the country and their wives and children are in detention camps. The facilities are run by Syrian Kurdish forces, who have come under heavy attack by Turkey, following President Trump's order for U.S. troops to withdraw from parts of Syria.


A woman walks with children at the Kurdish-run al-Hol camp where families of ISIS foreign fighters are held in northeastern Syria on Oct. 17.
 
NPR contacted a Syrian humanitarian worker who is in touch with detainees in al-Hol camp in northeastern Syria to hear what they are saying about Baghdadi's death. He called them on their smuggled cellphones and provided recordings of some detainees.

"We are all soldiers of Baghdadi ... but the jihad hasn't stopped," says one of the women, an Iraqi. "And there's nothing to prove he died. We heard in the news. It's been a rumor numerous times. As warriors, we believe that even if Baghdadi dies, the caliphate will not end. ... We aren't just here for one person."

Analysis: The End Of The 'Caliphate' Doesn't Mean The End Of ISIS
WORLD

Analysis: The End Of The 'Caliphate' Doesn't Mean The End Of ISIS
"If Baghdadi is dead, there are tens of thousands of Baghdadis," says another detainee, speaking in French. "Do not think we are over. We are like a boiling volcano in constant eruption."

Some of the women in the camps say they regret joining ISIS. One Tunisian woman sends texts saying she is relieved Baghdadi is dead. "He will be rewarded with hell," she says.

But she and some of the other women detained with her do not trust President Trump's account that Baghdadi died in a cowardly way, she says. "Nobody believes Trump's tales."

Fatma Tanis and Jane Arraf reported in Mosul, Iraq; Daniel Estrin and Lama al-Arian reported in Beirut, Lebanon; and Alex Leff contributed from Washington, D.C.  

A worker in Mosul, Iraq, assesses the damage in the al-Nuri Mosque compound. Workers are reconstructing the mosque's al-Hadba minaret.
  
Add caption 
 Iraqi youth watch the news of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi's death, in Najaf, Iraq, on Sunday.
Alaa Al-Marjani/Reuters

October 2, 2017

Las Vegas Shooting Kills 58, with 515 Taken to Hospitals






Las Vegas shooting kills 58, with 515 taken to hospitals

Police run to cover at the scene of a shooting near the Mandalay Bay resort and casino on the Las Vegas Strip, Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, in Las Vegas. Photo: John Locher / AP
Las Vegas authorities say approximately 50 people are dead and 406 people were transported to hospitals after a man opened fire on an outdoor concert late Sunday night. The suspect is Stephen Paddock, 64, a white male from Mesquite, NV. Police have also reportedly located 62-year-old Marilou Danley, who is Paddock's roommate, although she's no longer a person of interest.
For context: If the death toll holds, this will be the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, passing the 2016 attack on the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida.
Police said in a press release that Paddock opened fire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel, across the street from the venue, and SWAT officers found him dead when they entered the room.
The Department of Homeland Security said there was no "specific credible threat" to other public venues in US after Las Vegas shooting
Details from the scene, per the NYT: "The shooting happened near the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino. Video posted online showed the country singer Jason Aldean performing outside the hotel at Route 91 Harvest, a country music festival, interrupted by the sound of automatic gunfire. The music stopped, and concertgoers ducked for cover. 'Get down,' one shouted. 'Stay down,' screamed another."
Editor's Note: This post has been corrected to note that Marilou Danley is believed to be Paddock's roommate, not his wife.
This is a breaking news post and will be updated as we learn more. Follow @axios on Twitter for the latest.

August 20, 2017

Barcelona Attack Events




 Barcelona attack suspects

At least 14 people were killed and 130 injured on Thursday when a driver deliberately slammed a van into crowds on Barcelona's most popular street in what police confirmed was a terror attack.

Citizens of 24 countries were among those killed and injured in Barcelona including one Belgian national confirmed to have died.

A seven-year-old British boy is among those missing following the Las Ramblas rampage, which Prime Minister Threresa May said left a "small number" of Britons injured. 

The attack, the latest in a wave of vehicle rammings across Europe in recent years, caused panic on the streets of Spain's largest city and drew condemnation from world leaders.

"It was clearly a terror attack, intended to kill as many people as possible," Josep Lluis Trapero, senior police official, said.


Hours later, police said they had shot dead "four suspected terrorists" and left another injured in Cambrils, a city south of Barcelona.

The regional government of Catalonia, where both Barcelona and Cambrils are located, also confirmed the incident in the early hours of Friday, which police had earlier qualified as a "possible terrorist attack." 

The Van

A white Fiat van, reportedly rented, rammed into pedestrians outside a kosher restaurant on a busy street in Barcelona shortly after 5pm on Thursday.

The vehicle van veered onto the promenade and barreled down the busy walkway in central Barcelona for 500 metres, swerving back and forth as it mowed pedestrians down and turned a picturesque tourist destination into a bloody killing zone. 

Victims were left sprawled in the street, spattered with blood or writhing in pain from broken limbs. Others fled in panic through Las Ramblas, screaming or carrying young children in their arms.

Lawyer and University of Glasgow rector Aamer Anwar was walking La Ramblas when he heard screaming.

He said a shopkeeper told him five or six people were badly injured and described the scene as "chaos".

Mr Anwar said: "I was walking down Las Ramblas for something to eat. Part of it was in the shade so I decided to keep walking down and literally within 10 seconds there was a crashing noise. 

Armed Police Arrive

"I turned around and people were screaming - I could see a woman screaming with her kids - people started running and jumping into shops. I ran for about 50 or 100 metres and stopped to see what was happening. "

British tourist Keith Welling, who arrived in Barcelona on Wednesday with his wife and 9-year-old daughter, said they saw the van drive past them down the avenue and took refuge in a restaurant when panic broke out and the crowd started running.

"People were shouting and we heard a bang and someone cried that it was a gunshot ... Me and my family ran into the restaurant along with around 40 other people.

"At first people were going crazy in there, lots of people crying, including a little girl around three years old."


What happened in Cambrils?

Residents of the Spanish seaside resort of Cambrils fled in terror in the early hours of Friday after five terrorists wearing suicide vests launched the second ramming attack in the country in a matter of hours. 

At least six people were hurt when the attackers drove into pedestrians before being shot dead by security forces, just hours after a similar attack in nearby Barcelona.

Of the six civilians caught up in the Cambrils attack, two were said to be in a serious condition.

One later died according to an official Twitter account.


The Audi A3 car rammed into people on the seaside promenade of the tourist city 74 miles south of Barcelona, where a van had earlier sped into a street packed full of tourists, killing 13 people and injuring around 100 others.


Police said the suspects in Cambrils carried bomb belts, which were detonated by a police bomb squad.

Media reports said a car crashed into a police vehicle and nearby civilians and police shot the attackers, one brandishing a knife. Police did not immediately say how the attack was being carried out.

A police officer and five civilians were injured and two were in serious condition. 

The explosive belts worn by attackers killed by police in Cambrils were fake, the Spanish region's head Carles Puigdemont told local radio station RAC1. He said bomb experts had confirmed the explosive belts were duds.

The suspects

Four people have so far been arrested over the attack, including Driss Oukabir, the elder brother of van driver suspect Moussa Oukabir.

The driver of the van that mowed into the packed street was still on the run, Spanish police said on Thursday night.

There was a third arrest made on Friday morning - but it was unclear whether this was the driver.

Josep Lluis Trapero of the regional police of Catalonia said two other people suspected of being involved in the terror attack had been arrested - a Spaniard and a Moroccan.

One of the suspects arrested over the attack is a man born in the Spanish territory of Melilla in northern Morocco, he said.

The other, Driss Oukabir, is Moroccan. 

Spanish reports initially said that Driss Oukabir was being questioned on suspicion of involvement in the attack.

But on Thursday night the mayor of Ripoll, the town where he lived, 70 miles north of Barcelona, said that a man identifying himself as Driss Oukabir went to his local police station and reported that his documentation had been stolen.

Jordi Munell, the mayor, said that the man had insisted that he had been in Ripoll at the time of the attack and went to the local police station as soon as he saw his images broadcast in the media.

Police suspect that Driss Oukabir’s younger brother, named by Spanish media as 18-year-old Moussa, could have been involved.

In a further twist, Trapero said police suspected a deadly explosion late on Wednesday at a house in Alcanar 124 miles south of Barcelona was linked to the van attack.

Trapero said the explosion left at least one person dead, and police suspected those in the house were "preparing an explosive device."


"It seems there was an accumulation of gas that generated the explosion," he said, without giving further details.

The Spanish suspect was arrested in Alcanar, while Oukabir was held in Ripoll in northern Catalonia.

Isil claim responsibility

"Soldiers" of Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant carried out the deadly van attack, the jihadist organisation's propaganda outlet Amaq said.

"The executors of the Barcelona attack were soldiers of the Islamic State," Amaq said on its Telegram messenger account, without naming those it claimed were behind the attack.

Amaq said they had launched the attack in response to calls to target states taking part in the United States-led coalition battling the jihadist group in Iraq and Syria.

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy said the attack was "jihadist terrorism" which required a global response.

"Today the fight against terrorism is the principal priority for free and open societies like ours. It is a global threat and the response has to be global," Rajoy told a news conference in Barcelona.

Isil, which once controlled a self-declared "caliphate" across large parts of Iraq and Syria, has suffered major losses in recent months. Coalition-backed Iraqi forces recaptured its Iraqi stronghold Mosul in July.

World leaders condemn perpetrators and offer support to Spain

Prime Minister Theresa May said she is "sickened by the senseless loss of life in Barcelona".

"My thoughts are with the victims of today's terrible attack in Barcelona and the emergency services responding to this ongoing incident," she said. "The UK stands with Spain against terror.

British dual national child missing after Spain terror attacks, says May


Julian is Missing!"Julian is 7 years old and was out with Jom when they were separated, due to the recent terrorist activity. Please share, especially if you have family or friends in Barcelona. Thank you."
Julian Cadman
"Following the attacks in Manchester and London, Spain stood alongside the British people. Tonight, Britain stands with Spain against the evil of terrorism."

U.S. President Donald Trump wrote on Twitter: "The United States condemns the terror attack in Barcelona, Spain, and will do whatever is necessary to help. Be tough & strong, we love you!"



He later added: "Study what General Pershing of the United States did to terrorists when caught. There was no more Radical Islamic Terror for 35 years!"

In Germany, the office of German Chancellor Angela Merkel said they were thinking of the victims of the "revolting attack" with "profound sadness", while French President Emmanuel Macron voiced "France's solidarity" with Spanish citizens following what he called "a tragic attack".

Russian President Vladimir Putin called for the world to unite in an "uncompromising battle against the forces of terror".

"We decisively condemn this cruel and cynical crime against civilians," Putin wrote in a telegram of condolences to Spanish King Felipe VI. 

The missing, dead and injured (pics omitted)

The family of a seven-year-old boy has posted on Facebook begging for his safe return after he was separated from his injured mother.

Julian Cadman, from Australia, was out in Barcelona on holiday with his mother, when the terrorist's van struck where they were walking, separating them. 
Jom Cadman, the mother of Julian, was found in hospital and is in a serious but stable condition.

His cousin, George Cadman, wrote on Facebook: "My cousin, Julian Alessandro Cadman is missing. Please like and share. We have found Jom (his Mum, my cousin-in-law) and she is in a serious but stable condition in hospital. 

Victims of the van rampage that left 14 people dead and around 100 others injured were of at least 24 different nationalities, Spain's civil protection agency said.

A three-year-old child is among those confirmed dead, Spanish media reported, while authorities said a Belgian woman also died.

Spanish media also reported that three Germans were among those killed.


In Australia, Foreign Affairs Minister Julie Bishop confirmed that four Australians had been hurt in the attack, while one person was missing.

A spokesman had earlier said that among the victims in the popular seaside city were nationals from France, Germany, Spain, the Netherlands, Argentina, Venezuela, Belgium, Australia, Hungary, Peru, Romania, Ireland, Greece, Cuba, Macedonia, China, Italy and Algeria - without detailing whether he was referring to those who died or were injured.

Witnesses spoke of a scene of carnage, with bodies strewn along the boulevard as others fleeing for their lives.

"When it happened I ran out and saw the damage," local shop worker Xavi Perez told AFP.

"There were bodies on the floor with people crowding round them. People were crying. There were lots of foreigners."


December 22, 2016

Suspect Anis Amri Emerged from Jail a Mentally Different Young Man


 
 Anis Amri selfie posted on social media




In his impoverished Tunisian hometown, Anis Amri drank alcohol and never prayed, his brothers say. Then after joining the wave of migrants crossing the Mediterranean, he ended up in an Italian jail, only to emerge an utterly changed man.

Now he is prime suspect in this week's attack on a Berlin Christmas market and two of his brothers, Walid and Abdelkader, fear the failed asylum seeker may have been radicalized by radical Islamists while he spent almost four years behind bars.

"He doesn't represent us or our family," Abdelkader told Sky News Arabia. "He went into prison with one mentality and when he came out he had a totally different mentality."

German police have yet to establish who drove a truck into the market stalls on Monday, killing 12 people, though the interior minister said there was a "high probability" it was Amri. Abdelkader however said he was sure his brother - who turned 24 on Thursday - was innocent of the crime.

Whether or when Amri was radicalized has also yet to be proved. But in Oueslatia, a rural town that lives mostly off agriculture, the brothers said something had profoundly changed Amri after he made the dangerous sea crossing to Italy five years ago as a teenager.

"When he left Tunisia he was a normal person. He drank alcohol and didn't even pray," Walid told the TV channel. "He had no religious beliefs. My dad, my brother and I all used to pray and he didn't."

German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere said on Thursday that investigators had found the fingerprints of Amri, who is being hunted across Europe, on the truck's door.

"If he did this, it is a dishonor to us. But I am sure that he did not do it. He went to Europe because of social reasons, to work and to help our family," Abdelkader told reporters.

A weeping Walid said their last contact had been 10 days ago. "We were in touch with him through Facebook and by telephone and he has no relation to terrorism," he said.

LAMPEDUSA ARRIVAL

A senior Italian police source told Reuters that Amri arrived on the island of Lampedusa, probably after being rescued at sea, in February 2011. Amri's crossing, made shortly after the overthrow of Tunisia's autocratic president in the first of the "Arab Spring" revolts, followed a route that tens of thousands of other boat migrants have since taken.

Amri was at a shelter on Lampedusa when migrants started a fire, destroying parts of it to protest against being held there. He told authorities he was a minor, though documents now indicate he was not, and he was transferred to the Sicilian city of Catania, where he was enrolled in school. 

In October 2011 he was arrested after attempts to set fire to a building, the source said, and later convicted of vandalism, threats and theft.

Amri served his term in at least two different prisons in Sicily, first in Catania and then in Palermo, before being sent in May 2015 to a detention center to await deportation.

Asked whether Amri had been radicalized in prison, the police source said he did not know about this period, while the director of the penitentiary system did not respond to Reuters queries.

Palermo's court opened an investigation on Thursday into his time in prison in Sicily to collect information on his time behind bars, according to a senior magistrate.

Walid pointed a finger of blame for Amri's change on fellow inmates. "Maybe he got into this when he was in prison where he met Algerians, Egyptians and Syrians," he said.

Italy tried to deport Amri to Tunisia, but authorities there refused to take him back, saying they could not be sure he was Tunisian, and so he was released after 60 days and merely asked to leave the country.

LITTLE OPPORTUNITY, FERTILE GROUND

Tunisian police were stationed outside the family home in a poor district of Oueslatia on Thursday, where Amri's father worked with a donkey cart. Counter-terrorism investigators had been talking to the father and brothers.

Oueslatia, near the historic religious city of Kairouan, is typical of small towns in central and southern Tunisia that offer little opportunity for young men and became fertile ground for jihadist recruiters.

    Residents say in 2014 several families in Oueslatia had sons leave to fight for Islamist militant groups and die in Syria, Iraq and neighboring Libya.

According to Walid, Amri had indeed left Italy in 2015 and headed to Germany, joining a tide of migrants, via Switzerland.

Amri applied for asylum in the western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia but this was rejected in June this year. Again he could not be deported as he did not have identification papers, so Tunisia would not take him.

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While in Germany, he came to the attention of security officials. Berlin authorities put him under surveillance this year over suspicions that he had been planning a robbery to fund the purchase of automatic weapons, and was seeking accomplices for a possible attack.

Ralf Jaeger, interior minister of North Rhine-Westphalia, said on Wednesday that German security agencies had shared information on him with the Joint Counter-Terrorism Centre in November, weeks before the attack.

Mass-circulation newspaper Bild quoted an unnamed counter-terrorism official as saying: "It became clear in the spring that he was looking for accomplices for an attack and was interested in weapons."

Amri, however, was not arrested. Security officials stopped their surveillance in September after their suspicions that he had been planning an attack did not firm up.

WILLING TO DIE

During his time in Germany he moved between North Rhine-Westphalia and Berlin. In July this year, police opened an investigation against him in connection with a knife brawl in the capital, Bild said.

German media reported that in North Rhine-Westphalia, Amri had contact with an Islamist network led by a man known as Abu Walaa ("Father of Loyalty"), who was arrested with four other men in November. They faced charges of setting up a "jihadist network" that tried to recruit Muslims to go to Syria and fight alongside Islamic State militants.

Abu Walaa, identified in German court papers as 32-year-old Iraqi Ahmad Abdulaziz Abdullah A., is awaiting trial.

Bild also reported that Amri had expressed willingness to carry out a suicide attack in online chats in jihadist forums.

Tunisian authorities estimate nearly 4,000 citizens have left to fight overseas with jihadist groups, ranging from middle-class students, army dropouts and a top-flight professional footballer to young men from poor, rural areas.

(Additional reporting by Michael Nienaber in Berlin and Patrick Markey in Algiers; Writing by David Stamp; Editing by Pravin Char)


December 21, 2016

Berlin Terror Suspect Rejected for Asylum and Under Investigation



German officials are searching for a Tunisian man whose ID was found under the driver's seat of the truck used in Monday's attack. The suspect was said to already have been under investigation for a terror plot. German authorities said on Wednesday that they are searching for a Tunisian man in connection with Monday's terror attack in Berlin.
The man has already being investigated in connection with an act of terrorism. The authorities noted his contacts with German Salafists, who follow an extremely conservative brand of Islam, according to the interior minister of German state North-Rhine Westphalia (NRW) Ralph Jäger.
They also launched a probe, based on suspicion that the 24-year-old Anis Amri was preparing "a serious crime against the state." 
"Security agencies shared their findings and information about this person with the Joint Counter-Terrorism center, most recently in November 2016," he told reporters on Wednesday.
Earlier this year, the authorities received a tip from federal security agencies that that the suspect might be planning a break-in. Officials suspected Amri could use the loot to buy automatic weapons.
According to prosecutors in Berlin, the authorities placed the Tunisian under surveillance in March.
While the surveillance data showed that the man was involved in a drug dealing and a bar brawl, it turned up no evidence to confirm the original suspicion. The monitoring was canceled in September this year.
Tunisian radio station Radio Mosaique reported that Amri server four years in Italian jail for burning down a school. The outlet cited Amri's father and Tunisian security officials as sources.
No papers - no deportation
Interior Minister Jäger added that the suspect was living in NRW before traveling to Berlin in February. He also confirmed that the man applied for the asylum and was rejected.  
However, the authorities ran into bureaucratic hurdles while trying to repatriate him.
"The man could not be deported  because he had no valid ID papers," Jäger told the media.
He added that the Tunisia has initially denied that this man was their citizen.
"The papers only arrived today," he said. "I will not comment on this any further."
Also on Wednesday, some 150 police officers raided a migrant shelter in Emmerich, near the Dutch border, where suspect reportedly lived before moving to Berlin. The raid is a part of a nationwide manhunt.

dw.com

September 23, 2016

Omar Mateen Went into Pulse to kill Gays Like Him to Impress Gay Hating Dad




Crime Watch Daily has exclusive new insight into Omar Mateen, who shot up an Orlando nightclub, killing 49 people. Mateen's ex-wife sits down to tell her story to Crime Watch Daily's new special correspondent, Kim Goldman.
Sitora Yusufiy has found peace of mind and a new life in pristine Boulder, Colorado, but one thing she’s never able to escape is her association to the man who committed the worst mass shooting in modern American history. Mass-murderer Omar Mateen stormed into popular Orlando, Florida gay nightclub Pulse on June 12 and gunned down 49 innocent souls, wounding 53 others. A bullet-riddled Mateen goes to his grave in a shootout with police SWAT teams. 
Was the New York-born Muslim actually an ISIS sympathizer hell-bent on a jihadi one-way ticket to martyrdom? A self-hating gay man? Or something else?

"He never was sexually interested," said Sitora Yusufiy.

Now finally the one person who wants to set the record straight on what she believes is the motive behind the most horrific mass shooting in modern American history.




 "When I heard that he pledged to ISIS, I immediately know that was nonsense, because I knew Omar," said Yusufiy.

Sitora Yusufiy believes her ex-husband was gay and continually tormented by what she calls his homophobic father, Seddique Mateen. Sitora says Omar lived life in the shadows.
Yusufi tells Crime Watch Daily she is absolutely adamant her ex's pledge to ISIS in the midst of the horror was a ruse. Sitora says he was really just out to win the approval of his dad, who often publicly disparaged gays.
Crime Watch Daily went to Seddique Mateen’s home to ask him about his former daughter-in-law’s claims, but he did not want to talk to us.

Sitora claims much of Mateen's anger came from what she describes as his turbulent relationship with what she calls his homophobic father, who Sitora claims often taunted him about being gay.
Sitora says living a lie triggered the rage in her husband, and before his now-infamous attack, that rage was often directed at her.
Sitora tells Kim Goldman she became a virtual hostage in her own home. Her worried parents drove to Florida to check on her. It was time to get her out. They drove off together after a confrontation with Omar, and Sitora got an emergency ticket to New Jersey the next day.
Sitora now reveals Mateen actually tried to reconnect not long ago. The terror hit her all over again. Sitora says she has never looked back. 
But now for the first time, she is sharing a painful secret: She was once pregnant with Omar Mateen's child. It's a secret she's carried for seven long years. 
"He was happy about it but I told him that if he wanted to make things work, he had to find the courage to come to Jersey to apologize, to do whatever it takes to win my family and myself back, and he never did," said Sitora. "He never made an effort to do that."
Sitora says she made the difficult choice to terminate the pregnancy. 
But out of ashes of tragedy rose a resilient Sitora. The portrait artist has rebuilt her life and is happily married, and the couple is now expecting their first child. 
As for Omar Mateen's father, in recent interviews he has condemned his son's actions, calling what he did an "act or terror." Seddique Mateen has also been adamant that he does not believe his son was gay.

September 21, 2016

What You Should Know About NY Terrorist Bomber Ahmad Khan






US authorities have charged 28-year-old Ahmad Khan Rahami in connection with a bombing that injured 29 people on Saturday in Manhattan and two other incidents involving explosives in New Jersey. Rahami, a US citizen who was born in Afghanistan, also faces five counts of attempted murder of police officers for the shootout that led to his arrest on Monday.

Here's everything we know — and don't know — so far about Rahami and the bombings:

Why did he do it?

Nobody is sure yet. Rahami's family had a long-running dispute with the city of Elizabeth, New Jersey, a city about 20 miles outside of Manhattan, where they live and own First American Fried Chicken. Rahami's father sued the city, accusing police of a racially-motivated "campaign of harassment and intimidation" to force the business to close earlier. The lawsuit accused a neighbor, who frequently complained about noise and the late-night clientele, of saying, "Muslims make too much trouble in this country." It's unclear whether the lawsuit and tensions over the restaurant, where Rahami was a fixture, were a factor in the attacks.

Rahami, who attended high school and community college in New Jersey, traveled to Pakistan and his family's homeland in Afghanistan several times starting in 2011. Most recently, he spent more than a year in Quetta, Pakistan, a city on the Afghan border with a strong Taliban presence, returning in 2014. People who knew him from the family's restaurant in New Jersey told the New York Times he was "a completely different person," after he returned. He grew out his beard and began wearing a traditional Afghan clothing. The FBI is still investigating whether he was inspired by or taking orders from a terrorist organization such as the Islamic State. 

CNN has cited unnamed US law enforcement officials as saying Rahami kept a notebook that mentioned Anwar al-Awlaki, a prominent US-born Muslim cleric who supported al-Qaeda and was killed in a US drone strike in 2011. The notebook also reportedly contained references to the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, who used a pressure cooker bomb similar to the one he allegedly planted.

Where did he learn to make the bombs?

A senior law enforcement official who spoke with the New York Times said there's no evidence yet that he had received military or bomb-making training abroad.

According to law enforcement sources cited by CNN, Rahami was questioned by US authorities after each of his trips to Afghanistan and Pakistan, but they had no reason to suspect that he was involved in terrorism. He was also interviewed by officials "for immigration purposes," according to the Associated Press, but he wasn't on any watch lists.

The bombs he allegedly made were relatively sophisticated. They used flip-style cellphones as a timing mechanism — the phones helped link the bombs in Manhattan to the ones found in New Jersey — with Christmas lights to trigger the blasts. The pressure cookers left in Manhattan were filled with shrapnel and HMTD, according to the Times, an explosive that can be made with a few readily available chemicals. Some of the bombs also reportedly used Tannerite, an explosive powder available at many sporting goods stores for use at shooting ranges.

"Where did he really go and what did he do overseas that a kid who lived a normal New Jersey life came back as a sophisticated bomb maker and terrorist?" one unnamed official law enforcement official told the Times.
As some media outlets have already noted, instructions for making pressure cookers bombs are easily found online, and al-Qaeda's online magazine Inspire infamously included an article titled, "Make a bomb in the kitchen of your mom."

The investigation is still ongoing, but right now it still appears that Rahami acted alone.

How did he choose his targets?

It's still a mystery.

The bomb that did the most damage was placed under a dumpster in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood, near a home for the blind. A second bomb was left on the sidewalk four blocks away, but two thieves may have unwittingly disabled it when they removed it from a rolling suitcase and made off with the luggage. According to the Times, authorities believe Rahami drove his father's car into New York City shortly before the Chelsea blast at 8:30 p.m, and surveillance footage shows him in the area with baggage.

Three pipe bombs were attached to each other and left in a trash can along the route of a US Marine Corps charity 5K race in Seaside Park, New Jersey. One bomb exploded at around 9:30am on Saturday, but the race hadn't started yet and nobody was injured. Five more pipe bombs were found late Saturday night in a backpack on top of a garbage can near a train station in Elizabeth, just a few minutes away from the Rahami family's restaurant, suggesting the possibility that Rahami ditched them there after fleeing Chelsea.

Rahami was caught the following morning after he was found sleeping in the doorway of Merdie's Tavern in Linden, New Jersey, a town near Elizabeth. He shot one police officer, who was saved by a bulletproof vest, and fired wildly with a handgun at others as a he tried to flee on foot. Rahami was shot several times by police, but he is expected to survive.

Where's his wife?

On one of his early trips to Pakistan, Rahami found a wife. CNN reported that he filed paperwork to bring her to the US in 2011, but it's still unclear whether she ever made the trip. New Jersey Congressman Albio Sires said Rahami contacted his office in 2014 seeking help with his wife's immigration paperwork.

"He wanted his wife to come from Pakistan," Sires said on MSNBC. "At the time she was pregnant and in Pakistan. They told her that she could not come over until she had the baby, because she had to get a visa for the baby."

The Los Angeles Times cited an unnamed US official as saying she was allowed to enter the country at some point, and returned to Pakistan a few days before the bombings. She was reportedly questioned by officials in the United Arab Emirates, but her current whereabouts are unknown.

Rahami also had a daughter with a high school girlfriend, according to the New York Times.

Why didn't anybody see this coming?

According to the Times, Rahami's father warned police after a domestic dispute incident in 2014 that his son was a terrorist. Two unnamed law enforcement officials told the paper that Rahami's father made the comment to New Jersey police, and the information was passed along to a regional terrorism task force led by the FBI's Newark office. The father reportedly changed his tune when the FBI came to interview him, saying he made the comment out of anger.

Rahami had a few previous encounters with law enforcement, including an incident in 2014 when he was arrested on weapons and aggravated assault charges for allegedly stabbing a relative in the leg, according to court records found by the New York Times. He spent three months in jail, but a grand jury declined to indict him. He was also reportedly arrested and jailed for a day in February 2012 for violating a restraining order.

While Rahami's frequent travel to Afghanistan and Pakistan certainly looks suspicious in hindsight, he had family members in both countries, giving him a legitimate reason to visit.

He was also, by most accounts, mild-mannered and well-liked. Acquaintances told the Times he enjoyed racing and tricking out his Honda Civic, and a high school friend said he was relatively popular. "Everyone seemed to like him," the friend told the Times. "Smart, funny, humble." There was reportedly some tension with his father, who was more religious and traditional, but nothing that raised red flags.

His bail is set at $5.2 million


September 19, 2016

Need to Find This NYC, NJ Bomber Now!


'The Picture is in the Interactive post. Use curser]

This suspect was captured in NJ today. Someone complaint there was a man sleeping at the entrance of a building. When police arrived he pulled out his gun and tried to kill the officer. He was then shot by police. He was taken to a local hospital where he is in stable condition. The officer is also fine.

 The police is very eager to interrogate him and find out why he wanted to hurt and kill strangers particularly in this nation that had given him and his father and family refuge. He is a naturalized American citizen from Afghanistan. He is made a few trips there and back. Along the way someone convinced him that it was ok to turn towards those that have given his family refuge and thus seemed to be doing well here.
He was living with his father on a building that houses the family’s “First American Fried Chicken” shop in Elizabeth, NJ.

Should family’s be made responsible for their radicalized adult siblings? This is a question some will be asking but this is becoming something that is happening more and more. The kids of family’s that are doing well here after immigrating having children that turn against this nation. The Orlando shooter was also the son of an Afghanistan refugee. 

I believe we should treat them according to the law but people will be asking what does the law says and how it can be made stricter. Actually we probably don’t need new laws because it its at the hands of a judge that will probably will take all the facts which we don’t have right now to make sure there is never any problem from this individual again but one has to ask how we can try to make others see that such things will bring a price of those left behind. Would that serve as a deterrent to someone who is willing to convert himself into a so called martyr?Would he care?

The best answer is for everyone to keep their eyes open. Intelligence and cameras help tremendously in finding out a culprit before people are hurt and kill or after an incident like this to help the police catch him before he does more damage. A tough job and an imminent thread that is not going to disappear while we have the fighting with ISIS and Al-caida. 

Adam



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