February 28, 2020

Can Trump Pardon His Buddy Roger Stone? NO! Here is Why:


 

 Roger Stone





I kept hearing about Trump pardoning one of his cronies Roger Stone. I wasn't sure and this is what I found out:


Both the plain meaning of the Constitution’s text and the historical evidence show that once a president has been impeached, he or she loses the power to pardon anyone for criminal offenses connected to the articles of impeachment — and that even after the Senate’s failure to convict the president, he or she does not regain this power. 

Under Article II, Section II of the Constitution, the president is given the “power to grant reprieves and pardons for offenses against the United States, except in cases of impeachment.” Pardons are supposed to be used as acts of mercy. The framers thought of the pardon power as a “benign prerogative”—prerogative because it was mostly unchecked by courts or Congress, but benign because presidents would use it for the public good.

But the framers knew not to place blind trust in the president to wield the power justly. That’s why they explicitly forbade a president from exercising the pardon power in “cases of impeachment.” The clause prevents the worst abuse of the pardon power: a president’s protecting cronies who have been convicted of crimes related to the president’s own wrongdoing.


Sources: 
The Constitution
Article on Politico

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