June 8, 2016

In Sweden Two transgender girls risk deportation to Iraq



                                                                          transgender Karwan Sirwan
Transgender girls: Karwan, 22 anni, e Sirwan, 23.


 Transgender Karwan Sirwan
Karwan, 22, and Sirwan, 23.

Sirwan and Karwan are two transgender girls of Kurdish origin have fled from Iraq to seek asylum in the (civilized?) Sweden. But they risk being repatriated to the country of origin, place that will almost certainly condemn to a life of suffering, if not death.

Sirwan runs away from Iraq in 2012. It is pushed by her mother to flee, because for a male born girl is no longer safe to live in Arbil, Iraq's Kurdish city. The same father the threat of death, after being stopped by police for being dressed too "feminine" and forced to admit that he had a relationship with a man turkish. Also, it looks back on a gang rape story born of a kidnapping and repeated violence and harassment by unknown men who simply forced her to enter their car while walking down the street and then being able to rape.

Karwan also had to flee from their family of Arbil. After having participated in a talent show in women's clothes, her family discovered her and reached the television studio of the transmission, threatening to set fire to the local in order to avoid a new exhibition of his daughter. To the shame of having a transgender daughter, the family threatened to kill her, than to accuse her of the death of their mother, failure to an illness at the time. Karwan flees to Sulaymaniyah remaining hidden for three months, then make the trip to Turkey. Once he arrived on Turkish soil, the family of the new contact, reassuring her: this time it was not expected was killed, but only language mutilated and ears.

 
The two transgender girls, 22 and 23 years old, meet in Turkey after passing tough times like all migrants attempting to reach a European country. From their accommodation on a bench in a park, they decide to leave together for Sweden in September 2015.
Meet a smuggler who asks them € 1,500 to arrive illegally in Greece. Embark and their wrecked boat. While they are pushing in the sea with the few remaining forces to the coast seen four children die drowned.

The two girls make for political asylum for humanitarian reasons once you arrive in Sweden. The request is likely to be rejected, since the European authorities - and, consequently, those Swedes - they judged the northern Iraq as a safe area, so that is not automatically have to collect applications for asylum. Interviewed by theLocal.se, the two young men said they would be very dangerous for them to return to their country of origin, in the face of death threats and violence come from families.

This specific case highlights the commonality of the instances of struggle and ephemeral division that our Western society makes between different conditions: when it comes to LGBTI people, you do not think to migrants; when it comes to work, do not you think the right to health, to name two examples. The recent mobilization fueled by the debate about the inadequate and exclusionary law Cirinnà should teach us how people as such must be respected, help if in trouble and counted as one of us, whatever the conditions they are living. We must teach that alone do not get anything, you have to have the support of other people who have made a path - individual or collective - of self-consciousness and, to reverse roles, we must not fail to actively involve himself in the struggles in other .

The two transgender girls Kurdish are getting a warning: do not expect to be safe, to be better, to be lucky, do not sit on your results. Just nothing to become the last of the last, the fight is not over. Do not abandon us and migrants do not leave, please use the tools of your countries to save us. And finally, even the persecuted - Iraqi Kurds - are not immune from the atrocities: the division of the struggles generates cross-cutting issues.
Translated from French by adamfoxie and Google

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