Showing posts with label Nudidity. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Nudidity. Show all posts

December 4, 2015

Should You Care About Nudity? WHY?







WHY YOU SHOULD CARE
Because nudity is as old as time. And so are the attempts to control it. That should say something to all of us. Why do we hide? Why do make others hide which is more important?
 
  
It’s still swimsuit season, there’s still time to lace up those sneakers and get moving. Which is exactly what some folks are doing as they seek out classic jogging sensations: the steady bounce, the adrenaline build, the burning quads, the wind against their … genitals?

These days, a certain group of people are running around, only they’re doing it buck naked, sporting just sneakers for flair. Here in the industrial town of Porto Alegre, Brazil, the trend has been happening so often that it’s being called febre de pelados, or naked fever. Over the past several months, around the city’s streets and parks, folks have spotted — and often snapped with cellphone cameras ­— naked joggers. Some call it silly, others outrageous, but the police call it something between criminal and insane.

The Porto Alegre joggers aren’t alone. Across the globe, from Colorado and Ohio to the U.K. and New Zealand, people are heading out for naked sprints. Some recently cycled nude in cities around the world to raise awareness for different causes, while others have poured buckets of red wine over their bare bosoms to protest bloodshed in Ukraine. Of course, public nudity isn’t particularly new. But watch the global headlines and you might notice that naked running seems to be having a prolonged revival, sometimes for familiar reasons: out of political protest, to support feminism or animal rights, or simply for the sheer enjoyment of jogging cru. In Brazil and some other countries, people appear to be doing it on a lark. Which makes the whole trend seem even more “ridiculous,” to 34-year-old Porto Alegre professor Rafael Pereira, “because this is one of the coldest places in Brazil.”

In a time of X-rated selfies and sexting, nude jogging can seem almost quaint, even pure.
Not surprisingly, the naked jogging trend has sparked another trend: the banning of naked jogging, or public nudity in general. In 2012, San Francisco passed a public nudity ban, shutting down the thrills of those like nude protester George Davis, who griped to the San Francisco Chronicle that his hometown would soon lose its reputation as “the kinkiest city.” Just last week, Topeka, Kansas, followed (anti-birthday) suit, and Sacramento is considering doing the same. Go to New York, and you’ll find a city entrenched in a battle over the desnudas of Times Square, who cover their breasts only with paint and pose for pictures in exchange for tips. Recently, a controversy kicked up in Cambodia over tourists posing for photos near Angkor Wat with brilliantly white smiles and a lot of brilliantly white skin. Barcelona, the place where the party doesn’t start until dawn, went even further and banned “partial nudity” — such as wearing a bikini around town. As it turns out, at least in the realm of the European Court of Human Rights, public nudity is not a basic human right.

                                                                              
 Running man




  
A naked demonstrator runs in Athens during a protest against the visit of German Chancellor Angela Merkel.
Source: Aris Messinis/Getty
It’s been a long, uphill jog for nudity lovers over the years. Throughout history, so-called nonsexual social nudity has been linked to cultural touchstones, from naked competitors in the Olympics of ancient Greece to the development of the sport of surfing in 1800s Polynesia. Around the turn of the 20th century, the first naturist club was founded in India, and the first naturist resort founded in Germany. But 1974 may have been the high-water mark for public nudity, with a rash of streaking events across American college campuses. The fad even slipped onto the stage at the Oscars that year. Topless movements sparked across the U.S. in the ’90s, but today — to the chagrin of frequently topless comedian Chelsea Handler and others — toplessness is still not legal in about a third of the states.

And yet we might be seeing a revival of the time-honored practice of public buck-nakedness. In 2010, Felicity Jones co-founded the Young Naturists America to promote the cause to millennials via events like topless Meetups, naked hikes and that perennial favorite, skinny-dipping. Its second-annual NYC Bodypainting Day attracted 70 artists and 100 models this year, twice as many as last year, but it could have been even bigger: “We’re trying to not grow it too quickly,” says 27-year-old Jones. The American Association for Nude Recreation says the naked rec market — think nude beaches, resorts, cruises — is already worth almost half a billion dollars. Even the TV networks are taking a crack at showing crack: Seemingly endless nude reality shows have crept up on us, from Discovery Channel’s Naked and Afraid to VH1’s Dating Naked. Turns out that while all the participants strip down, executives line their pockets.

Though it may sound surprising given the bronzed-butt-and-thong situation, toplessness is still illegal on the beaches of Brazil. That, of course, has led to repeated protests, which often look like small groups of bare-breasted women encircled by the erect zoom lenses of hordes of “photographers.” Repeating an argument often made elsewhere, Ana Paula Nogueira, leader of the 1,000-strong Topless in Rio movement, says it’s just not fair that men can go to restaurants and even church without shirts, but women can’t go topless on the beach. “Brazil is a bit schizophrenic,” Nogueira says: Underlying the country’s hypersexualized image, there’s a deep strain of sexual conservatism. Those topless protests? Maybe they’re a spectacle now, but she insists they’re really about gender equality, and meant to normalize public nudity in the long run.

NUDE EVENTS FOR ANY OCCASION

Golfing: La Jenny, France

Yoga: Bold and Naked Yoga, New York

Olympics: Pilwarren Maslin Beach, Australia

Night running: Kenya

Camping: Taylor Camp, Kauai, Hawaii

Volleyball: White Thorn Lodge, Pennsylvania

Sledding: Magdeburg, Germany

Rugby: Dunedin, New Zealand

Streaking: any ole U.S. college
Indeed, when it comes to public nudity, our cyberlicious modern world turns up one constant around the globe: the share factor. For every topless protest, there are a thousand InstaPics; for every nude trot, a grainy cellphone vid. Ask folks like Nogueira and the media attention is part of the deal. But in a time of X-rated selfies and indiscriminate sexting, naked jogging on your own can seem almost quaint, even pure.

So why should you slip on your birthday suit alfresco? “When you shed your clothes, you shed your stress,” proclaims Carolyn Hawkins, spokeswoman for the AANR. In her view, meeting someone at a nudist resort takes on an equalizing dimension. “You find out who they are from inside, from the heart,” she says. Similar logic drives the latest (nude) trend in yoga. Practitioners liken their naked asanas to a philosophical stance, driven by deep moral beliefs about authenticity, transparency and the like. Such lofty claims aside, being naked among other naked people in quasi public settings can be just, well, fun. “A lot of people just enjoy it,” says Jones, of the Young Naturists.

But the impact of seeing a bouncing jogger in the nude has been taken quite seriously in some places. In Colorado a few years ago, a priest was found guilty of “indecent exposure” for dashing nude around a high school track. And down in Porto Alegre, the reaction to bare-skinned runners has been to send at least one of them to a mental hospital for being “imbalanced.” Mixed martial artist Betina Baino was one of those who recently strolled naked there on a rainy afternoon; she told Globo TV she did so for “personal reasons,” but her former trainer said he was worried she might have a psychological problem. Neither Baino nor her ex-trainer could be reached for comment, but Antonio Barbaresco, a spokesman for the city of Porto Alegre, says no one seems to know why more nude joggers have been out and about. “It’s something spontaneous that no one understands,” he says.

There is some hope for public-nudity advocates. Munich recently created six “Urban Naked Zones” for sunbathing in the buff, while Barcelona dropped its “partial nudity” (aka bikini) ban in April. Meanwhile, in New Zealand, an appeals court overturned a ruling against a naked runner for “offensive behavior.” “If it was offensive,” the man told the local paper, “then God wouldn’t have given us genitals.”

Top Image Source: Marta Nascimento/Redux

August 24, 2015

Worldly New past Time of Nude Jogging [US, Europe, Brazil]




It’s still swimsuit season, there’s still time to lace up those sneakers and get moving. Which is exactly what some folks are doing as they seek out classic jogging sensations: the steady bounce, the adrenaline build, the burning quads, the wind against their … genitals?
These days, a certain group of people are running around, only they’re doing it buck naked, sporting just sneakers for flair. Here in the industrial town of Porto Alegre, Brazil, the trend has been happening so often that it’s being called febre de pleads, or naked fever. Over the past several months, around the city’s streets and parks, folks have spotted — and often snapped with cellphone cameras ­— naked joggers. Some call it silly, others outrageous, but the police call it something between criminal and insane.
The Porto Alegre joggers aren’t alone. Across the globe, from Colorado and Ohio to the U.K. and New Zealand, people are heading out for naked sprints. Some recently cycled nude in cities around the world to raise awareness for different causes, while others have poured buckets of red wine over their bare bosoms to protest bloodshed in Ukraine. Of course, public nudity isn’t particularly new. But watch the global headlines and you might notice that naked running seems to be having a prolonged revival, sometimes for familiar reasons: out of political protest, to support feminism or animal rights, or simply for the sheer enjoyment of jogging cru. In Brazil and some other countries, people appear to be doing it on a lark. Which makes the whole trend seem even more “ridiculous,” to 34-year-old Porto Alegre professor Rafael Pereira, “because this is one of the coldest places in Brazil.”
In a time of X-rated selfies and sexting, nude jogging can seem almost quaint, even pure.
Not surprisingly, the naked jogging trend has sparked another trend: the banning of naked jogging, or public nudity in general. In 2012, San Francisco passed a public nudity ban, shutting down the thrills of those like nude protester George Davis, who griped to the San Francisco Chronicle that his hometown would soon lose its reputation as “the kinkiest city.” Just last week, Topeka, Kansas, followed (anti-birthday) suit, and Sacramento is considering doing the same. Go to New York, and you’ll find a city entrenched in a battle over the desnudas of Times Square, who cover their breasts only with paint and pose for pictures in exchange for tips. Recently, a controversy kicked up in Cambodia over tourists posing for photos near Angkor Wat with brilliantly white smiles and a lot of brilliantly white skin. Barcelona, the place where the party doesn’t start until dawn, went even further and banned “partial nudity” — such as wearing a bikini around town. As it turns out, at least in the realm of the European Court of Human Rights, public nudity is not a basic human right.
running naked (153804501)
 It’s been a long, uphill jog for nudity lovers over the years. Throughout history, so-called nonsexual social nudity has been linked to cultural touchstones, from naked competitors in the Olympics of ancient Greece to the development of the sport of surfing in 1800s Polynesia. Around the turn of the 20th century, the first naturist club was founded in India, and the first naturist resort founded in Germany. But 1974 may have been the high-water mark for public nudity, with a rash of streaking events across American college campuses. The fad even slipped onto the stage at the Oscars that year. Topless movements sparked across the U.S. in the ’90s, but today — to the chagrin of frequently topless comedian Chelsea Handler and others — toplessness is still not legal in about a third of the states.
And yet we might be seeing a revival of the time-honored practice of public buck-nakedness. In 2010, Felicity Jones co-founded the Young Naturists America to promote the cause to millennials via events like topless Meetups, naked hikes and that perennial favorite, skinny-dipping. Its second-annual NYC Bodypainting Day attracted 70 artists and 100 models this year, twice as many as last year, but it could have been even bigger: “We’re trying to not grow it too quickly,” says 27-year-old Jones. The American Association for Nude Recreation says the naked rec market — think nude beaches, resorts, cruises — is already worth almost half a billion dollars. Even the TV networks are taking a crack at showing crack: Seemingly endless nude reality shows have crept up on us, from Discovery Channel’s Naked and Afraid to VH1’s Dating Naked. Turns out that while all the participants strip down, executives line their pockets. 
Though it may sound surprising given the bronzed-butt-and-thong situation, toplessness is still illegal on the beaches of Brazil. That, of course, has led to repeated protests, which often look like small groups of bare-breasted women encircled by the erect zoom lenses of hordes of “photographers.” Repeating an argument often made elsewhere, Ana Paula Nogueira, leader of the 1,000-strong Topless in Rio movement, says it’s just not fair that men can go to restaurants and even church without shirts, but women can’t go topless on the beach. “Brazil is a bit schizophrenic,” Nogueira says: Underlying the country’s hypersexualized image, there’s a deep strain of sexual conservatism. Those topless protests? Maybe they’re a spectacle now, but she insists they’re really about gender equality, and meant to normalize public nudity in the long run. 
Indeed, when it comes to public nudity, our cyberlicious modern world turns up one constant around the globe: the share factor. For every topless protest, there are a thousand InstaPics; for every nude trot, a grainy cellphone vid. Ask folks like Nogueira and the media attention is part of the deal. But in a time of X-rated selfies and indiscriminate sexting, naked jogging on your own can seem almost quaint, even pure.
So why should you slip on your birthday suit alfresco? “When you shed your clothes, you shed your stress,” proclaims Carolyn Hawkins, spokeswoman for the AANR. In her view, meeting someone at a nudist resort takes on an equalizing dimension. “You find out who they are from inside, from the heart,” she says. Similar logic drives the latest (nude) trend in yoga. Practitioners liken their naked asanas to a philosophical stance, driven by deep moral beliefs about authenticity, transparency and the like. Such lofty claims aside, being naked among other naked people in quasi public settings can be just, well, fun. “A lot of people just enjoy it,” says Jones, of the Young Naturists. 
But the impact of seeing a bouncing jogger in the nude has been taken quite seriously in some places. In Colorado a few years ago, a priest was found guilty of “indecent exposure” for dashing nude around a high school track. And down in Porto Alegre, the reaction to bare-skinned runners has been to send at least one of them to a mental hospital for being “imbalanced.” Mixed martial artist Betina Baino was one of those who recently strolled naked there on a rainy afternoon; she told Globo TV she did so for “personal reasons,” but her former trainer said he was worried she might have a psychological problem. Neither Baino nor her ex-trainer could be reached for comment, but Antonio Barbaresco, a spokesman for the city of Porto Alegre, says no one seems to know why more nude joggers have been out and about. “It’s something spontaneous that no one understands,” he says. 
There is some hope for public-nudity advocates. Munich recently created six “Urban Naked Zones” for sunbathing in the buff, while Barcelona dropped its “partial nudity” (aka bikini) ban in April. Meanwhile, in New Zealand, an appeals court overturned a ruling against a naked runner for “offensive behavior.” “If it was offensive,” the man told the local paper, “then God wouldn’t have given us genitals.”

Shannon Sims
ozy.com

April 25, 2014

James Franco’s Nude Paintings of Seth Rogen: Priceless



seth-rogen-nude-franco-censoredSeth Rogen and James Franco are involved in the most homoerotic, greatest bromance the world has ever known. Franco posted further proof of this on his Instagram (NSFWish) yesterday.
“SETH ROGEN NUDE PAINTINGS – get ready!!! THEYRE COMING!!!” Franco captioned the post featuring the fuzzy funny man in all his glory (hole).
The dynamic duo’s previous, totally gay art project — “HOTSEX” in V Man — gave the world the gift that keeps on giving, “Bound 3.” This time around we’re gifted with Seth Rogen’s butt crack…because some art is priceless.

  by Les Fabian Brathwaite

April 12, 2014

Vintage Nudes of WWII Buddies in the Service



                                                                              
 
new book by Scotty Bowers and photographer Michael Stokes, takes a fascinating look at the tight “”buddy”” relationships commanders encouraged their troops to engage in to bolster morale during World War II.
The description to “My Buddy. World War II Laid Bare” details Michael Stokes search for over 400 vintage photos, revealing WWII soldiers and sailors bonding in the buff:
Every harrowing day for a serviceman during World War II was potentially his last. To help bolster troops against the horrors of combat, commanders encouraged them to form tight “”buddy”” relationships for emotional support. Many war buddies, together every moment, and depending on each other to survive, formed intimate friendships.
When they weren’t fighting side by side, they relaxed together, discharging tension in boisterous play—sometimes naked play. The full extent of nude horseplay among men during World War II can’t be known, as cameras were rare and film hard to process, but some men did document this unprecedented male bonding in small, anonymous photos mostly kept hidden away until their deaths.
Los Angeles photographer Michael Stokes has spent years searching out these photos and building an archive of over 400 images. His collection includes soldiers and sailors from England, Germany, Poland, Russia, and the U.S.A., cavorting on the sand in the South Pacific, shivering in the snow of Eastern Europe, posing solo in the barracks, and in great happy groups just about everywhere.
These images show men barely out of boyhood, at their physical peak, responding to the reality of battle by living each day to the fullest—a side of the war never before made public.
Out Magazine adds:
There was a certain amount of what they call grab-ass in the service, which is what you see in these pictures.
“Playing grab-ass,” but only when you’re not in combat. You know, it’s just like a bunch of kids together. These guys were all young in the Marine Corps, 18, 19, 20, and they might play grab-ass when they’re swimming in the ocean or swimming in a river. And someone could possibly take a picture.

[ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF TASCHEN. THE MICHAEL STOKES COLLECTION (SUN BATHERS). THE JIM HEIMANN COLLECTION (SHOWER). THE DIAN HANSON COLLECTION (CLIFF DIVE) via Out.com]

October 4, 2013

A Ban Getting Undressed at Britain’s Most Famous Nudist Beach is Quickly Overturned


A ban on nudists getting undressed on one of Britain's most famous beaches has been lifted by the Queen's estate.
Officials told naturists they must cover up on the sands at Holkham, north Norfolk, after complaints that it had become 'a haven for swingers and perverts'.
The beauty spot featured in Shakespeare in Love and was the setting for the final scene of the Oscar winning film where Gwyneth Paltrow walks along the beach after surviving a shipwreck.

Nudist hotspot: Naturists were banned from the beach after locals complained about people having sex and propositioning others
Nudist hotspot: Naturists were banned from the beach after locals complained about people having sex and propositioning others

 
Nudists were warned they faced arrest and prosecution if they got undressed on the beach which attracts around 500,000 visitors every year.
But after a campaign by British Naturism, which has around 10,000 members, the Crown Estate has performed a U-turn.

They insisted 'a small minority of troublemakers' was to blame for anti-social behaviour and were prepared to seek a judicial review if the ban was not lifted immediately.
Campaigns director Malcolm Boura said: 'We very much welcome the lifting of the ban and we are meeting the other interested parties later this month.
Beach ban: After a campaign by British Naturism, which has around 10,000 members, the Crown Estate has performed a U-turn
Beach ban: After a campaign by British Naturism, which has around 10,000 members, the Crown Estate has performed a U-turn
'We are confident that by following best practice any remaining problems can be resolved. We hope that it is all behind us now.'
He added: 'A lot of naturists were extremely angry and upset when the ban was put in place but there is no reason why it should happen again.
'That part of the beach has been used by naturists for as long as anyone can remember and we are working very hard to ensure it stays that way.'
The ban on nudism in the dunes, which are owned and managed by Holkham Estate, and on all land above mean high water, will still be enforced.
The beach and dunes form part of the Holkham National Nature Reserve which is also managed by the Holkham Estate.
The ban came after a Facebook campaign was launched in the summer of 2010 to crackdown on sex pests roaming the sands. Locals have complained about people having sex in public and propositioning beach-goers. 
One campaigner wrote in August 2010: 'My last three visits to the beach have seen me propositioned twice.
'I've witnessed gay sex in the sand dunes and men walking around "playing". I've reported this to the wardens and local PCSO but nothing has been done.
'The beach used to be a lovely place to go but now it's just a haven for swingers and perverts who won't take no for an answer.'
Partial lifting: The ban on nudism in the dunes, which are owned and managed by Holkham Estate, and on all land above mean high water, will still be enforced
Partial lifting: The ban on nudism in the dunes, which are owned and managed by Holkham Estate, and on all land above mean high water, will still be enforced
David Horton-Fawkes, estates director at the Holkham Estate, said: 'We are aware that the Crown Estate has reversed its decision about nudism on the beach following the threat of judicial review by a small group of naturists.
'Until now the ban on nudism had stopped the illegal activity that has plagued the beach.
'We can only hope that this decision does not re-open the door to those who have ruined this part of the Nature Reserve for the vast majority of beach users.'
He added: 'The ban on nudism on Estate land remains in place because we believe it is important to safeguard our staff and visitors.
'Our team will continue to work closely with the Crown Estate, the police and Natural England to uphold the interests of the majority of people who visit the beach.'
The Queen's Household Cavalry take their horses to swim in the sea at Holkham every summer. 
Daily Mail UK 

September 22, 2012

Nude Rugby for Charity } Are you Giving?

6


The guys use the visibility to raise money for charity, this year helping a 6-year-old girl with leukemia. Their popularity is  a sign of how relaxed other parts of the world are about nudity vs. the U.S. Getty Images sent a stream of uncensored images out and a local paper ran a video that hid nothing.





Cool conditions were no deterrent to the Nude Blacks as they took on the Springbox at the North Ground in Dunedin today.
In what has become something of a rugby tradition in the city, the teams played an unofficial curtain-raiser to tonight's All Blacks v Springboks test at Forsyth Barr Stadium and more than 1000 people turned out under grey skies to watch.
The home side ran out 30-20 winners in a match that came to life in a second half featuring a pizza delivery car and a guest appearance by a solitary nude woman who joined the Springbox for a single play and sneaked over for a try.
Earlier, the Nude Blacks entertained the crowd with their warm-ups and a haka, which reportedly drew as many groans as laughs from the watching crowd.


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March 13, 2012

Gay Man Sues Over Thong Discrimination in San Diego

Man's Loincloth Claim Rejected by City
       A gay man claims in Federal Court that he has the "dubious distinction" of being the first person in San Diego history to be arrested for public nudity for wearing thong underwear under a gladiator kilt, at a gay pride event.
     Will X. Walters claims city police selectively enforced a municipal policy on public nudity, which allows women to wear g-strings and thongs, but not gay men.
     Walters also claims that San Diego Pride "wholeheartedly endorsed" the policy, to "curry favor" with the police department, to appeal to mainstream sponsors, and to make the event palatable to straight people and families.
     "Will Walters is a Hispanic, gay man who owns the dubious distinction of being the only person in the history of the City of San Diego to be arrested and booked on a charge of public nudity," the complaint states. "Mr. Walters was arrested for public nudity at the 2011 Lesbian Gay Bi-Sexual Transgender Pride ('Pride') event while wearing an opaque gladiator type kilt over black underwear. Under any definition, he was not nude, as his buttocks and genitalia were fully covered. Nonetheless, he was ushered out of the event, humiliated, arrested, and incarcerated."
     Named as defendants are the City of San Diego, Lt. Nieslit, Sgt. Mondesir, Officer Ramirez, Officer Gardner, Officer '3329,' San Diego Pride, head of Pride security, Shawn Chamberlain, and Does 1-30.
     According to Walters, the city's enforcement of its public nudity law "essentially allows thongs, g-strings, and other skimpy bathing suits to be worn by participants and attendees at straight special events, but not by attendees and participants at the one gay special event, Pride."
     Walters claims that after he bought a $20 ticket, he "was readily admitted into the 2011 event by San Diego Pride personnel."
     "He was dressed in leather gear consisting of boots, a black leather gladiator kilt, black underwear, and a black leather harness with chrome rings. His outfit ostensibly passed muster with the Pride personnel manning the admission gates, as Pride personnel ushered him into the event. His underwear and kilt completely covered his genitals, pubic hair, buttocks, perineum, anus or anal region as required by San Diego Municipal Code Section S6.S3(c). Mr. Walters had invested a significant sum of money in his leather gear and took special care to insure that he was compliant with the rules for the event," the complaint states.
     Walters says that even though he was admitted into the festival, Lt. Nieslit told him that his leather gear was "borderline." While he was lining up for a drink, Walters claims, other officers approached him and forcibly escorted him outside. He claims Pride security knocked his camera phone out of his hand as he tried to record the incident.
     After refusing to sign a citation, Walters was handcuffed, arrested and driven to jail, according to the complaint.
     "At the jail Mr. Walters was placed in a single cell visible to all inmates being checked in. San Diego County sheriffs deputies encouraged the incoming inmates to ridicule Mr. Walters, who was wearing only his kilt and underwear, and the deputies joined in the verbal harassment. In going from the hot environment of an overheated car to the air conditioned jail, Mr. Walters was chilled. The deputies refused Mr. Walters any additional clothing or a blanket. However, upon his release from jail, Mr. Walters was ordered to change into clothing provided by the jail. Mr. Walters was released from the jail at approximately 2:15 am, Sunday, July 17, 2011, after posting $190 bond. He had been given nothing to eat or drink since his arrest, some twelve hours prior," according to the complaint.
     Walters says that the city's policy, implemented by a police task force, violates his rights under the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.
     "The City of San Diego's failure to curtail this selective enforcement and its subsequent ratification of Mr. Walters' arrest, only serves to guarantee that this custom and policy will continue unabated. It is the enforcement of this disparate and unequal policy that resulted in the unlawful arrest and incarceration of Mr. Walters," the complaint states.
     Walters is represented by Christopher Morris with Aguirre, Morris & Silverson.
     He seeks an injunction and compensatory and punitive damages for violations of the Fourteenth and Fourth Amendments, false arrest, battery, negligence and violation of his civil rights under California's Civil Code.

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