Showing posts with label Missing. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Missing. Show all posts

February 15, 2017

Separatists/Ukraine are Asked About Missing Russ.Trans/Activist


Seroye Fioletovoye (center-hanging, aka Oleg Vasliyev and Maria Shtern) used to belong to
Pussy Riot

International rights groups have urged separatist leaders in eastern Ukraine to disclose the location and ensure the safety of a Russian LGBT activist and a fellow performance artist who went missing there two weeks ago.

Friends of transgender activist Seroye Fioletovoye (Gray Purple) and musician Viktoria Miroshnichenko say they have not heard from the two since they entered separatist-controlled territory on January 31.

The Kremlin-loyal tabloid news outlet Life News on February 13 cited an unidentified source with the separatists as saying that the two were detained because Fioletovoye had planned to stage a protest in support of sexual minorities in a separatist-held area of Donetsk.

There has been no formal confirmation of that claim, and Amnesty International said in a February 13 statement that it has "serious concerns" about the safety of the two Russians.

The international rights group published a petition calling on separatist leaders to reveal the location of the two Russians and protect them from "physical and psychological" abuse.

Russia-backed separatists control areas of the Donetsk and Luhansk regions in Ukraine's east nearly three years after the start of their war against Kyiv's forces that has killed more than 9,750 people.

International rights watchdogs and Western governments have repeatedly accused the separatists of illegal detentions and abuses, including torture.

Fioletovoye, who was born Oleg Vasliyev and also goes by the name Maria Shtern, is a former member of the Russian art group Voina, which drew international attention with its daring antigovernment stunts and spawned the dissident art collective Pussy Riot.

The activist typically uses "it" in self-reference, and rights advocates became increasingly concerned after a February 9 update appeared on Fioletovoye's Twitter feed referring to the activist as male.
Two tweets from the account of Seroye Fioletovoye that use a different personal pronoun to refer to the missing LGBT activist.
Two tweets from the account of Seroye Fioletovoye that use a different personal pronoun to refer to the missing LGBT activist.


The tweet was subsequently deleted and replaced with a new post consistent with the activist's typical gender identification.

"Friends, I am in the far-flung regions of the DNR," the tweet reads, using an acronym used by the separatists that stands for Donetsk People's Republic.
"I am busy with a film. There is almost no Internet. I'm alive and well," it continued.

The Twitter feed had been dormant since August, and the sudden tweet has raised suspicions that the activist was not the person who posted it.

"It was very, very creepy, and very concerning, too," Tanya Cooper, a Ukraine researcher for the New York-based Human Rights Watch, told RFE/RL.

Miroshnichenko is a musician who previously collaborated with Fioletovoye. She staged a performance-art piece at a 2013 event related to LGBT issues that Fioletovoye moderated.

In her most recent Facebook post -- on January 31 -- Miroshnichenko wrote that she would be online infrequently until February 15. She added in a comment to the post that she was traveling to the southern Russian region of Rostov, which borders the Donetsk region.

Human Rights Watch said in a February 10 statement that it feared the two had become the victims of "forced disappearance."

"Their disappearance demands an immediate and effective investigation," Cooper said in the statement
Based on reporting by Christopher Miller in Kyiv and Carl Schreck in Washington
rferl.org

December 31, 2014

Looks like Indonesian Fl.8501 Final Resting Place has been Found


                                                                        

The search for doomed AirAsia Flight QZ8501 might soon come to an end. Indonesian officials believe a sonar-detected image of a large, dark objectfloating deep in the Java Sea is the missing airliner.
The development comes as the massive multinational search effort consisting of several ships, helicopters and planes ended its fourth day after the passenger jet with 162 aboard lost contact with air traffic control midway through its short flight Sunday between Surabaya, Indonesia, and Singapore. 
Source: CNN/Twitter
CBS News reports that it's unclear if the plane is intact. Likely proof that the plane crashed came Tuesday after there were reports of a "shadowy" object was seen floating off the coast of Boreno, not far from where the plane disappeared from radar screens. Since Tuesday, rescuers have recovered plane debris, passenger belongings and seven bodies floating near where the plane went down. 
Until the plane's black boxes are recovered, what brought the AirAsia flight down remains a mystery. If the pilot's last communication with air traffic control is any indication, stormy weather might have played a factor: Investigators are focusing on the timing of the crew's request to climb to a higher altitude to avoid bad weather as a possible factor behind the tragedy, Reuters reports.
More details of the final moments are emerging as the search continues. A body recovered Wednesday was wearing a life jacket, raising new questions about how the disaster unfolded and supporting a theory that the Airbus A320 suffered an aerodynamic stall and remained intact before hitting the water. 
The search will resume Thursday morning. 

April 2, 2014

Flight 370 } Yellow Debris Not The Plane } Black Box About to Stop ‘Ping'

PERTH, Australia -- A cluster of orange objects spotted by a search plane hunting for any trace of the missing Malaysia Airlines jet turned out to be nothing more than fishing equipment, Australian officials said Monday, the latest disappointing news in a weekslong hunt that Australia's prime minister said will continue indefinitely.
The Ocean Shield, an Australian warship which is carrying a U.S. device that detects "pings" from the flight recorders, left Perth on Monday evening for the search zone, a trip that will take three to four days. The Australian Maritime Safety Authority, which is coordinating the search, said it conducted sea trials on Monday afternoon to test the search equipment on board.
The crew of an Australian P-3 Orion search plane spotted at least four orange objects that were more than 6 feet in size on Sunday, and the pilot, Flight Lt. Russell Adams, dubbed the sighting their most promising lead in the search for Flight 370. But on Monday, Jesse Platts, a spokesman for the AMSA, said the objects had been analyzed and officials had confirmed "they have nothing to do with the missing flight."
Its a frustrating pattern that has developed in the hunt for the Boeing 777, which vanished on a night flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8 with 239 people aboard: Search crews have repeatedly spotted multiple objects floating in remote patches of the southern Indian Ocean, only for officials to later confirm they arent linked to the missing plane.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott on Monday acknowledged the search was incredibly complex, but said officials were "well, well short" of any point where they would scale the hunt back.
The search for Flight 370 has evolved over the past three weeks as experts sifted through a limited set of radar and satellite data, moving gradually from the seas off Vietnam, to waters west of Malaysia and Indonesia, and then to several areas west of Australia.
"This is an extraordinarily difficult exercise .... we are searching a vast area of ocean and we are working on quite limited information," Abbott said, adding that the best brains in the world and all the technological mastery is being applied to the task.
"If this mystery is solvable, we will solve it," he said.
He said the search that has been going on for more than three weeks is operating on guestimates "until we locate some actual wreckage from the aircraft and then do the regression analysis that might tell us where the aircraft went into the ocean."
Meanwhile, officials on Monday said that the last communication from the cockpit was "Good night Malaysian three seven zero." In a statement, the Malaysian Department of Civil Aviation said "authorities are still doing forensic investigation to determine whether those last words from the cockpit were by the pilot or the co-pilot."
Earlier, authorities had said the last words from the cockpit were "All right, good night." The reason for the discrepancy was not clear.
Ten planes were either over the search zone or heading there by late Monday afternoon, and another 10 ships were scouring the area, about 1,150 miles west of Australia. More than 100 personnel in the air and 1,000 sailors at sea were involved in Monday's hunt, with some sections of the 98,000 square mile search zone expected to experience low clouds and rain. It takes planes about 2 1/2 hours to get to the area, allowing a five-hour search before they must return to Perth.
Former Australian defense chief Angus Houston on Monday began his job of heading the new Joint Agency Coordination Center, which will oversee communication with international agencies involved in the search. The Perth-based center will position Australia to shoulder more of Malaysia's coordination responsibilities as the search drags on.
Houston will also play a prime coordination role when victims' families travel to Australia in the weeks ahead.
Abbott said he was not putting a time limit on the search. "We owe it to everyone to do whatever we reasonably can and we can keep searching for quite some time to come ... and, as I said, the intensity of our search and the magnitude of operations is increasing, not decreasing."
A towed pinger locator sits on the wharf ready to be fitted to the Australian ship Ocean Shield to aid in her roll in the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in Perth
A towed pinger locator sits on the wharf ready to be fitted to the Australian ship Ocean Shield to aid in her roll in the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in Perth, Australia, March 30, 2014.
 AP
CBS News' Holly Williams reported Monday that the search area remains vast -- essentially still "the entire Indian Ocean," according to one American commander in Perth -- so the Ocean Shield crew is hoping confirmed debris from Flight 370 will be found floating on the ocean surface before their arrival on Thursday, to help them hone in on the right patch of ocean to drop in the ping detector. 
Meanwhile, several dozen Chinese relatives of Flight 370 passengers visited a Buddhist temple near Kuala Lumpur on Monday to pray for their loved ones. They offered incense, bowed their heads in a moment of silence, knelt several times during the prayers and lowered their heads in kowtows. Buddhist nuns handed out prayer beads to them. "You are not alone," one nun said. "You have the whole world's love, including Malaysia's."
Several of the relatives were overcome with emotion, tears streaming down their faces.
The family members later made a brief statement to journalists, expressing their appreciation to the Chinese government and the people of Malaysia and the volunteers who have been assisting them. They bowed as a show of gratitude, but also said they were still demanding answers.
"To those who are guilty of harming our loved ones, hiding the truth, and delaying the search and rescue, we will also definitely not forgive them," said a family representative, Jiang Hui.
The relatives' comments Monday were seen as a small conciliatory move after they staged an angry protest in front of reporters on Sunday at a hotel near Kuala Lumpur. At the time, they chanted slogans, raised banners and called on the Malaysian government to apologize for what they dubbed missteps in the handling of the disaster.
CBS/AP

March 22, 2014

All you Need to Know on the Latest on Missing Airliner as of Sat.AM

 
PETALING JAYA: The discovery of debris suspected to be from missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 is the strongest lead yet in the search for the missing aircraft, yet raises many questions that beg to be answered.
The Australian Maritime Safety Authority's (Amsa) John Young made the announcement on Thursday, saying they had satellite imagery of debris in the southern Indian Ocean located some 2,500km south-west of Perth, but cautioned that "the images captured by satellite… may not be related to the aircraft."
A CNN report stated that the area was "a remote, rarely travelled expanse of ocean, far from commercial shipping lanes", and raised pertinent questions on the search for MH370.
Here are the questions raised in CNN's report:
When will we know if the debris is from MH370?
John Young, AMSA general manager of emergency response said it would be a lengthy process.
AMSA general manager John Young is seen next to an graphic map during a press conference.
"We have to locate it, confirm that it belongs to the aircraft, recover it and then bring it a long way back to Australia, so that could take some time," he said.
Would debris from the plane still float?
Steve Wallace, the US Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) former director of accident investigation said that if the plane crashed into the water, large pieces would have sunk to the bottom by now.
Pieces of lightweight debris, such as life jackets and seat cushions - and not parts of the aircraft's structure - could remain floating for days.
Could the plane have gone that far?
Mitchell Casado, a 777 flight simulator flight instructor, said that the amount on fuel on board is paramaount.
"The 777, when fully fuelled, can go 16 to 18 hours. Flight 370 wasn't," he said.
"As long-range as this aircraft is, it's a long way to any suitable airport out there. There are some small islands, you know, that you could possibly land at, but that would really be pushing the limits of the airplane.
"So I would really be worried about running out of gas. Some planes flew over the area, and a ship went there. What did they find?" he asked.

What else could it be, if not the plane?
It could be any big, buoyant object. The objects were spotted in a part of the Indian Ocean known for swirling currents called gyres that can trap all sorts of floating debris.
It could simply be a shipping container that fell off a passing cargo vessel, though doubtful as the area is not near commercial shipping lanes. Furthermore, the larger object, at an estimated 79 feet (24 meters), would seem to be nearly twice as long as standard shipping containers.
Would its location yield clues as to what happened on the flight?
According to Robert Goyer, editor-in-chief of Flying magazine and a commercial jet-rated pilot, it would.
"The spot where searchers have found hoped-for clues is… is nearly 4,000 miles from where the airliner made its unexpected and as yet unexplained turn to the west," Goyer wrote. The first obvious clue is that the airplane flew for many hours.
What do the satellite images show?
Two indistinct objects, one about 79 feet (24m) in length and the other about 16 feet (5m) long. They may not look like much to an untrained observer, but Australian intelligence imagery experts were confident enough to pass them along to the maritime safety agency.
"Those who are experts indicate they are credible sightings. And the indication to me is of objects that are reasonable size and are probably awash with water, bobbing up and down out of the surface," Young said.
The DigitalGlobe Worldview-2 satellite, which captured the images of the two objects in the Indian Ocean.
When were the satellite images taken?
Commercial satellite imaging company DigitalGlobe captured the images on Sunday.
Why were they revealed only four days later?
Amsa said it took four days for the images to reach it "due to the volume of imagery being searched and the detailed process of analysis that followed."
Royal Australian Air Force loadmasters, Sergeant Adam Roberts (left) and Flight Sergeant John Mancey, launch a self-locating data marker buoy from a C-130J Hercules aircraft in the southern Indian Ocean. - EPA
How did they know where to look?
This southern corridor is said to have the most likelihood of the plane being found. US officials have also said the southern corridor is where the plane is most likely to be.
The searchers used complex calculations to narrow the likely area to a square, which is where the images came from.
Who is heading the search?
The Australians are in charge of the search in their area of responsibility, which includes a large area of the southern Indian Ocean off Australia's west coast. Malaysia remains in overall control of the search.
Will the flight data recorder's pings be picked up?
Detecting ultrasonic "pings" from data recorders would always be a difficult task, but under best conditions, pings can be detected at a two-mile (3.6km) range.
If the recorder is at the bottom of the ocean, warm waters would affect its range. The presence of thermoclines, or layers of different temperatures in the water would impede the pingers. The recorders’ batteries are said to be able to last about 30 days, and with the search now into its 14th day, time is running out.

TV and online information
This modern airliner was not supplied with the latest equipment to aid in case the plane went down. Some of these gadgets would have cost about $10. per flight. But in an environment that you are restricting peanuts  $10. a flight seems like a lot of money for bean counters

March 20, 2014

What is There Store for the Next Missing Airliner? {Adamfoxie* Publisher goes toes to toes with experts}




How Conspiracy Theories Go Viral

 I asked a computer geek today as we were discussing about how can you have a system that tracks planes without disappearing in mid air. Having Jets disappearing from the sky is too much a sci-fi program. I was told. It’s better that they crash and we find the remains and sell the american people the same old menu of old chicken salad than tell them what we  know what went wrong and the airliner will crash which rarely happens when the reason and the recommendations comes from a safety US team, like the NASB but the enforcement comes from another team call there FAA which is mandated by your heroes in congress to help the airlines make money. Most of those recommendations are never mandated a fix by the FAA.
You can’t make money if you are repairing the airlines Im told and it makes sense to me. It is cheaper to have them crash and make the pay out to the relatives of the dead which will be roughly the equivalent of another plane which they will need any way and the insurance most likely cover for that. 
So the airlines come out ahead having saved money on planes in service and expensive repairs.  The airlines have no monetary incentive to not let problematic systems on the planes not crash or disappear. The FAA usually wont enforce problems right away and if they do they will work with the airlines to make it as monetary inexpensive as possible.
The problem with disappearing without an answer for so long of a time is that you get too many people involved. With so many people is unlikely to hide many things and therefore come out financially sound. Also the airlines industry looses credibility and trust. Who want to get into a bullet that has a history of disappearing from earth, That is harder to swallow than an accident. The Psychology of people that travel is that they can handle accidents from bags being sent to the wrong direction to the plane landing on the wrong airport. Happens all the time.
But there is something that might help the situation of fissapearing airliners, not of all the other problems I just mentioned. For that I will refer you to the source on it which is 
Researchers in Italy have just developed "the next generation of radar," which could help track planes more closely. It comes at a time when tracking planes is a hot issue, after Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 went mysteriously missing from radar.
More than a week after the flight disappeared somewhere off the coast of Malaysia, officials still have no idea what happened to it or where it went. Recent reports suggest that radar in Thailand may have tracked the plane, but so far, all we know is that the plane eventually fell off all of the radars that were keeping tabs on it. As we explained shortly after the flight’s disappearance, radar has a limited range, and there are plenty of dead zones over certain parts of the ocean.
That’s because the radar technology we have hasn’t greatly changed since it was developed in the lead-up to and perfected during World War II. Electronics have gotten better and systems have become more sophisticated, but the basic, underlying technology—radio waves or microwaves go out, radio waves or microwaves bounce back in to an electronically-powered tower—has remained essentially the same.
That could soon change. A research team at Italy’s National Inter-University Consortium for Telecommunications has designed and tested a radar system based almost entirely on lasers, which could give us a longer range and increased accuracy when tracking airplanes.
Image: Malaysian Government


The photonics-based system was described in a study published Wednesday inNature, and military experts say it could quickly become the new standard if early tests can be improved upon. The system used a “mode-locked laser” that can stay trained on an airplane. This allows the plane’s movement across a radar screen to be much less jittery, because the radar is receiving more frequent updates about its position.
The light-based system can also remove much of current radar’s reliance on electronics, which could have potentially been useful if Flight 370 experienced an electrical fire, as some have suggested.
The new system has “phase noise and timing jitter that are approximately half those of state-of-the-art conventional RF synthesizers,” according to Jason McKinney, a photonics researcher at the U.S. Naval Research Lab. “Their work shows that such techniques may indeed provide capability for next-generation radar systems.”
Here's a schematic of how the whole thing works. Image: Nature


In a field test, lead researcher Paolo Ghelfi tracked a series of planes taking off from a local airport and then compared his results to those on a public database and found “excellent agreement” between the two data sets.
More importantly, Ghelfi says that laser-based airplane radar can “increase the radar coverage,” over traditional radar, a capability we desperately need and one that may have come in handy in the case of Flight 370. Ghelfi wouldn’t speculate as to whether his radar system would have been able to track the missing plane because there is still much we don’t know about what happened, but says that his system offers more bandwidth, more flexibility, the potential to shift to “fully digital” radars, and higher precision than existing radar. 
We’ll never know if a photonics-based radar could have tracked Flight 370, but, if they ever become common, we might have more to go on if a similar mystery occurs in the future.
 Researchers in Italy have just developed "the next generation of radar," which could help track planes more closely. It comes at a time when tracking planes is a hot issue, after Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 went mysteriously missing from radar.
More than a week after the flight disappeared somewhere off the coast of Malaysia, officials still have no idea what happened to it or where it went. Recent reports suggest that radar in Thailand may have tracked the plane, but so far, all we know is that the plane eventually fell off all of the radars that were keeping tabs on it. As we explained shortly after the flight’s disappearance, radar has a limited range, and there are plenty of dead zones over certain parts of the ocean.
That’s because the radar technology we have hasn’t greatly changed since it was developed in the lead-up to and perfected during World War II. Electronics have gotten better and systems have become more sophisticated, but the basic, underlying technology—radio waves or microwaves go out, radio waves or microwaves bounce back in to an electronically-powered tower—has remained essentially the same.
That could soon change. A research team at Italy’s National Inter-University Consortium for Telecommunications has designed and tested a radar system based almost entirely on lasers, which could give us a longer range and increased accuracy when tracking airplanes.
Image: Malaysian Government
The photonics-based system was described in a study published Wednesday inNature, and military experts say it could quickly become the new standard if early tests can be improved upon. The system used a “mode-locked laser” that can stay trained on an airplane. This allows the plane’s movement across a radar screen to be much less jittery, because the radar is receiving more frequent updates about its position.
The light-based system can also remove much of current radar’s reliance on electronics, which could have potentially been useful if Flight 370 experienced an electrical fire, as some have suggested.
The new system has “phase noise and timing jitter that are approximately half those of state-of-the-art conventional RF synthesizers,” according to Jason McKinney, a photonics researcher at the U.S. Naval Research Lab. “Their work shows that such techniques may indeed provide capability for next-generation radar systems.”
Here's a schematic of how the whole thing works. Image: Nature
In a field test, lead researcher Paolo Ghelfi tracked a series of planes taking off from a local airport and then compared his results to those on a public database and found “excellent agreement” between the two data sets.
More importantly, Ghelfi says that laser-based airplane radar can “increase the radar coverage,” over traditional radar, a capability we desperately need and one that may have come in handy in the case of Flight 370. Ghelfi wouldn’t speculate as to whether his radar system would have been able to track the missing plane because there is still much we don’t know about what happened, but says that his system offers more bandwidth, more flexibility, the potential to shift to “fully digital” radars, and higher precision than existing radar. 
We’ll never know if a photonics-based radar could have tracked Flight 370, but, if they ever become common, we might have more to go on if a similar mystery occurs in the future.
Adam Gonzalez, Publisher
Source on New Radar: motherboard.vice.com 
                                                                       

March 16, 2014

Total Recall Update of Malaysian Missing Airliner

 The news: As we enter week two of searching for the lost plane Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, it seems more and more likely that some foul play was involved in its disappearance.
On Saturday, Malaysian prime minister Najib Razak announced that the jet's communications were intentionally turned off, and that it was potentially steered off course and flown for seven hours after it went missing — leading investigators to believe that there was "deliberate action by someone on the plane."
This is consistent with the findings that U.S. officials announced on Wednesday; after disappearing off the civilian radar, the plane drastically changed its altitude and direction. The more evidence emerges, "the more difficult to write off" the possibility of foul play, they said.
Here is a record of the plane's erratic behavior, as charted by the New York Times:

Image Credit: New York Times
What do we know? New evidence also came to light on Friday when a British satellite company announced that it received communication from the jet on the day of its disappearance, which the pilots — or those who assumed control — might not have known about. "Routine, automated signals were registered on the Inmarsat network from Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 during its flight from Kuala Lumpur," the company said. 
Based on the the satellite data, the search has now been focused on two distinct quadrants: one north of the Bay of Bengal and one stretching to the Indian Ocean. As of Saturday, 14 countries have sent 43 ships and 58 aircraft to survey these areas.
This map, released by Malaysian officials, outlines the two possible locations for the plane:
Image Credit: Office of the Prime Minister of Malaysia
What's next? While the plane could have traveled northward towards Indian territory, it is unlikely that its movement went completely undetected by Indian aviation authorities.Sources close to the investigation say it is far more likely that the jet ran out of fuel and eventually crashed into the Indian Ocean.
Due to the high probability that the plane's disappearance was a calculated attack, Malaysian officials said they are also looking deeper into the backgrounds of the passengers and the crew. The police have already searched the home of one of the pilots.
For now, the search continues over the vast Indian Ocean and beyond.

Image Credit: Bloomberg

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