Showing posts with label Crimea. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Crimea. Show all posts

August 1, 2016

The Donald Denies Russia Took Crimea but Will Legalized It

                                                                       
                                                                       

If the tittle seems odd is because the GOP candidate is being very odd by denying something that happened two years ago but nevertheless will legalize it by lifting sanctions. If it never happened and we have all been reporting a myth then why legalized it?  If you are not dating, then why get married?

Despite the fact that Russia took Crimea from the Ukraine in 2014
Donald Trump on Sunday insisted that Russian President Vladimir Putin will not “go into the Ukraine” despite the fact that Putin took Crimea from the European country two years ago.

During an interview with ABC’s George Stephanopoulos on This Week, the Republican presidential nominee reiterated that he didn’t have a personal relationship with Putin, whose government is believed to be behind the Democratic Nation Committee email leaks, but that the U.S. would benefit from a good relationship with Russia.

Trump also addressed remarks he made recently suggesting that he would “look into” recognizing Russia’s annexation of Crimea and lifting the sanctions subsequently imposed on Russia.
“He’s not going into Ukraine, OK, just so you understand. He’s not going to go into Ukraine, all right? You can mark it down. You can put it down. You can take it anywhere you want,” Trump said about Putin on This Week.

“Well, he’s already there, isn’t he?” Stephanoploulos said in response, referring to Crimea.

“OK, well, he’s there in a certain way. But I’m not there. You have Obama there. And frankly, that whole part of the world is a mess under Obama with all the strength that you’re talking about and all of the power of NATO and all of this,” Trump said. “In the meantime, he’s going away. He takes Crimea.”

“You know, the people of Crimea, from what I’ve heard, would rather be with Russia than where they were,” Trump later added. “And you have to look at that.”

Time

For the first time outside of propaganda one most at least ask what is up with this candidate and Putin?  If one is to speculate, The answer could be money and maybe the forgiving of the Donald’s loans from Russia but never in the history of the US even when the Mafia was in charge of so many enterprises there was never any serious allegations they were helping the other side. Money could be the obvious but there has to be something more. Many have speculated stupidity and ignorance of foreign affairs of this country and the world and that would seem more plausible than just wanting to help the other side just for helping the other side. There is no ideology here just pure “I am the man” and I do what ever I don’t want and don’t need to follow anyone’s road I make my own.To me the election of Bush proof one did not to have to have knowledge of the world or the countries affairs.  Nor be extremely intelligent either. But with Bush he surrounded himself with his father’s people which were already experienced working for Walker Bush and even Reagan. Still he got us into war with Iraq instead of going after Osama in Afghanistan (where he was and where we never sent any serious expedition until it was too late). He changed the world order for the worse with that incredible mistake. Imagine someone who does not take counsel from anyone, what would we be opening our selves to? What ever it is we would have deserved it because we would have elected him without learning from all the lessons from Bush who amazingly enough sees him as a threat. May be he sees too much of him in the Donald. Bush was counseled by his dad, chief of staff and others not to go into Iraq. It would be like sending a bull into a china shop.  People are crying out for change because things have changed for the better since Bush left office but people want it faster. They are also crying out with a racist cry like it did during the McCathy years and other times in history. This time with the weapons available to everyone it wont be a bull going into the china shop but more like nuke being fired from somewhere.
Adam Gonzalez
Image result for the manchurian candidate

September 28, 2014

Russian Gay Rights Activists Concern over Crimea Official “We don’t Need such people (gay)”

“We don’t need such people (Gay people)”
Sergei Aksyonov said "we do not need such people."

Gay-rights activists in Russia have expressed concern about provocative comments by a senior official in the de facto government of Crimea, the Ukrainian Black Sea peninsula that was annexed by Russia in March.
Sergei Aksyonov, the de facto prime minister of Crimea, on September 2 said "we in Crimea do not need such people," referring to gays and other sexual minorities. 
In addition, he said, if activists try to demonstrate in the region "our police and self-defense forces will react immediately and in three minutes will explain to them what kind of sexual orientation they should stick to."
"For a politician and for the head of a region it is a very upsetting comment. For one thing, it is not for Aksyonov to decide who can and can't live in Crimea," says Igor Kochetkov, director of the Russian LGBT Network in St. Petersburg. "Regardless of sexual orientation, no one should have to ask Mr. Aksyonov or his officials where they can live. It is an absolutely awful statement."
Gay-rights activist and lawyer Nikolai Alekseyev wrote on September 2 that "Aksyonov's statements are purely political words since such actions violate the law [on public gatherings] and Russia's international obligations."
"If Crimea has become part of Russia, naturally, it must follow federal law, which does not delegate such authority to subjects of the federation," Alekseyev was quoted as saying on September 3.
Gay rights activists face persecution in Russia.
Gay rights activists face persecution in Russia.
Aksyonov's harsh remarks reflect a growing climate of official social conservatism in Russia that was characterized by the adoption last summer of a law banning "the propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations" among minors.
In April, Alekseyev's request to hold gay-pride events in Sevastopol and Simferopol was rejected by the authorities, citing the antigay propaganda law. Alekseyev said the rejection is being challenged in courts in Crimea and in Moscow and he continues to hold out hope the ban will be overturned.
Situation Dire
According to Alekseyev's website, 164 applications for gay-pride events have been rejected by cities across Russia to date. In response to an appeal by Alekseyev's group, the European Court of Human Rights in 2010 ruled that Moscow's ban on gay-pride events in 2006, 2007, and 2008 was in violation of the European Convention on Human Rights.
The Ukrainian gay-rights organization Gay Forum Ukraine estimates there are about 10,000 gays and other sexual minorities living in Crimea. Russian activist Kochetkov says they have been caught up in the "general deterioration of human rights" in the region since it was annexed by Moscow.
LGBT activists in Russia have complained of increased rights violations and violence since the new law was passed last year. Alekseyev and fellow LGBT activist Kirill Nepomnyashchy were assaulted in Kostroma by two unknown assailants on September 1 while attempting to participate in a court hearing over that city's ban on gay-pride events. Alekseyev was also attacked during another trip to the central Russian city last year.
Kochetkov says that conservative and nationalist groups have "turned their attention to other targets" in recent months, but the situation remains dire for sexual minorities. Nonetheless, he says, Russian officials and institutions have been busy "enforcing" the antigay propaganda law.
"We are seeing new challenges, including a wave of firings of teachers and university instructors on the basis either of their sexual orientation or their public position calling for equal rights for all people without regard to sexual orientation," Kochetkov says. "These people are either being fired or have been threatened with dismissal."
In the Far Eastern city of Khabarovsk, LGBT activists have been accused by local security services of forming a "gay-terrorist" organization with the goal of fomenting an "Orange revolution" in Russia.
Several activists, many of whom have spoken out publicly against President Vladimir Putin and Russia's policies in Ukraine, have undergone searches and questioning by regional law enforcement.
Activist and blogger Andrei Marchenko told RFE/RL's Russian Service that the investigators who came to his home in Khabarovsk "were very rude and threatened me with four years in prison."
"They didn't find anything extremist -- no dollars or anything," Marchenko said. “But they got very happy when they saw I had a business card from Elizabeth MacDonald,” a U.S. consular representative in Vladivostok whom Marchenko says he met last year.

rferl.org

September 7, 2014

Leader of Crimea describes What they would do to “those people”(Gay people)


Sergei Aksyonov said "we do not need such people."


 Gay-rights activists in Russia have expressed concern about provocative comments by a senior official in the de facto government of Crimea, the Ukrainian Black Sea peninsula that was annexed by Russia in March.
Sergei Aksyonov, the de facto prime minister of Crimea, on September 2 said "we in Crimea do not need such people," referring to gays and other sexual minorities. 
In addition, he said, if activists try to demonstrate in the region "our police and self-defense forces will react immediately and in three minutes will explain to them what kind of sexual orientation they should stick to."
"For a politician and for the head of a region it is a very upsetting comment. For one thing, it is not for Aksyonov to decide who can and can't live in Crimea," says Igor Kochetkov, director of the Russian LGBT Network in St. Petersburg. "Regardless of sexual orientation, no one should have to ask Mr. Aksyonov or his officials where they can live. It is an absolutely awful statement."
Gay-rights activist and lawyer Nikolai Alekseyev wrote on September 2 that "Aksyonov's statements are purely political words since such actions violate the law [on public gatherings] and Russia's international obligations."

“If Crimea has become part of Russia, naturally, it must follow federal law, which does not delegate such authority to subjects of the federation,” Alekseyev was quoted as saying on September 3.
Aksyonov's harsh remarks reflect a growing climate of official social conservatism in Russia that was characterized by the adoption last summer of a law banning "the propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations" among minors.
In April, Alekseyev's request to hold gay-pride events in Sevastopol and Simferopol was rejected by the authorities, citing the antigay propaganda law. Alekseyev said the rejection is being challenged in courts in Crimea and in Moscow and he continues to hold out hope the ban will be overturned.
Situation Dire
According to Alekseyev's website, 164 applications for gay-pride events have been rejected by cities across Russia to date. In response to an appeal by Alekseyev's group, the European Court of Human Rights in 2010 ruled that Moscow's ban on gay-pride events in 2006, 2007, and 2008 was in violation of the European Convention on Human Rights.
The Ukrainian gay-rights organization Gay Forum Ukraine estimates there are about 10,000 gays and other sexual minorities living in Crimea. Russian activist Kochetkov says they have been caught up in the "general deterioration of human rights" in the region since it was annexed by Moscow.
LGBT activists in Russia have complained of increased rights violations and violence since the new law was passed last year. Alekseyev and fellow LGBT activist Kirill Nepomnyashchy were assaulted in Kostroma by two unknown assailants on September 1 while attempting to participate in a court hearing over that city's ban on gay-pride events. Alekseyev was also attacked during another trip to the central Russian city last year.
Kochetkov says that conservative and nationalist groups have "turned their attention to other targets" in recent months, but the situation remains dire for sexual minorities. Nonetheless, he says, Russian officials and institutions have been busy "enforcing" the antigay propaganda law.
"We are seeing new challenges, including a wave of firings of teachers and university instructors on the basis either of their sexual orientation or their public position calling for equal rights for all people without regard to sexual orientation," Kochetkov says. "These people are either being fired or have been threatened with dismissal."
In the Far Eastern city of Khabarovsk, LGBT activists have been accused by local security services of forming a "gay-terrorist" organization with the goal of fomenting an "Orange revolution" in Russia.
Several activists, many of whom have spoken out publicly against President Vladimir Putin and Russia's policies in Ukraine, have undergone searches and questioning by regional law enforcement.
Activist and blogger Andrei Marchenko told RFE/RL's Russian Service that the investigators who came to his home in Khabarovsk "were very rude and threatened me with four years in prison."
"They didn't find anything extremist -- no dollars or anything," Marchenko said. "But they got very happy when they saw I had a business card from Elizabeth MacDonald," a U.S. consular representative in Vladivostok whom Marchenko says he met last year. 
 By Robert Coalson

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