Showing posts with label Executions. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Executions. Show all posts

November 6, 2014

50 High Ranking N.Korea’s Officials Executed for watching South Korea’s Soaps

As many as 50 senior members of the North Korean government and military have been publicly executed so far this year, according to South Korea's intelligence agency. 
The victims of the purges - which the National Intelligence Service believes are continuing - include 10 members of the ruling Workers' Party who were executed by firing squad for watching South Korean soap operas, bribery or womanising. 
Many of the officials singled out by Kim Jong-un, the North Korean leader, were reportedly close to Jang Song-thaek, Mr Kim's uncle, who was arrested in December 2013 and executed for a series of crimes against the state. 
The ongoing elimination of Jang's allies indicates that Mr Kim is getting rid of potential sources of opposition and building his own power base, although executing a member of the party for watching a South Korean television show hints at a trumped-up charge. 
Defectors from North Korea have told The Telegraph that pirated versions of South Korean and Chinese television programmes are widely available in North Korea and are frequently traded on the black market. 
 And despite the North Korean government's efforts to stop its citizens learning about life outside their borders, the proliferation of mobile phones and electronic media that are easy to carry and conceal has made it impossible to keep all foreign influences at bay. 
Details on the executions were provided by the intelligence service in a report to the South Korean parliament on Tuesday, Yonhap News reported, while a further 200 officers in the artillery arm of the North Korean military have been demoted due to the poor accuracy of their units in training exercises. 
The NIS report also said the North has expanded the capacity of its political prison camps and that hackers in North Korea attempted to access thousands of smartphones in South Korea this year, using programmes disguised within mobile gaming apps. 
The report added that while Mr Kim has reappeared in public after undergoing successful surgery to remove cysts from his ankles, his weight many mean that the complaint will return in the future.
By , Tokyo

September 25, 2014

French Mountain Guide Beheaded in Algeria


                                                                             

IS itself has beheaded three Western hostages since August: US journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff, and British aid worker David Haines. Their deaths were all filmed and posted online.
The group has also threatened to kill Alan Henning, a taxi driver from the UK, who was seized while on an aid mission to Syria in December.
On Sunday, it warned it would target Americans and other Western citizens, "especially the spiteful and filthy French".
'Odious ultimatum'
Mr Gourdel worked as a mountain guide in the Mercantour national park north of Nice, his home town.
He had also been organising treks through the Atlas Mountains of Morocco for some 20 years, AFP news agency reports.
The mayor of Nice, Christian Estrosi, said it was difficult to contain the "deep sadness" he felt.
"Today a war was declared on France," he said. "We've been turning a blind eye to what's happening in our back yards. And this is where it has led us."
The BBC's Lucy Williamson in Paris says news of Mr Gourdel's killing has hit France hard.
Our correspondent says that it is the first time that France has lived through the threat and brutality of this kind of killing.
The fact that Mr Groudel was a tourist in a region popular with French holiday-makers has added to the sense of shock, our correspondent says.
In the video posted by his killers, he is shown on his knees with his hands behind his back in front of four masked, armed militants.
He is allowed briefly to express his love for his family before one of the militants reads out a speech in which he denounces the actions of the "French criminal crusaders" against Muslims in Algeria, Mali and Iraq.
The beheading, the spokesman says, is to "avenge the victims in Algeria... and support the caliphate" proclaimed by IS in Iraq and Syria.
Jund al-Khilafa (Soldiers of the Caliphate) pledged allegiance to IS on 14 September.
Until then it had been known as part of al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), which grew out of an Algerian militant group and is now active across North and parts of West Africa. 
The group claimed Toulouse gunman Mohamed Merah, a French citizen of Algerian origin, as a member after he killed seven people in south-western France in March 2012, French radio reports.
The militants said that they were responding to the IS call to attack citizens involved in strikes on Iraq and would kill Mr Gourdel unless France ended its military operation.
France’s public position is that it does not negotiate with militant groups but there have been reports of French.
BBC 

July 24, 2014

One Hr After Commencing Execution The Man was still Alive

Is the Guillotine better?            
 


Lawyers for Arizona death-row prisoner Joseph Wood said in court papers Wednesday that an hour after his execution began he was still alive — and they asked the court to stop the proceeding. "He has been gasping and snorting for more than an hour," lawyers wrote in a petition to the Arizona federal court. Wood — who was condemned to death for fatally shooting his girlfriend and her father in 1989 — challenged the execution on the grounds that the state was violating the First Amendment by keeping the source of the lethal-injection drugs secret. An appeals panel agreed with him, but the U.S. Supreme Court lifted the stay of execution.
Wood, 55, was scheduled to be killed with a combination of midazolam and hydromorphone, the same drugs used in an Ohio execution in which the inmate seemed to struggle for air and took 25 minutes to die. His execution date had been put on hold several times as the case wound its way through last-minute appeals. One of those decisions was notable for a dissent in which the chief judge of a federal appeals court said the guillotine would be better than lethal injection for executions.

March 27, 2014

Mississippi Wants to Execute a Mentally Ill Woman Today



Michelle Byrom
Michelle Byrom (AP Photo/Mississippi Department of Corrections)
Mississippi could execute a mentally ill woman by lethal injection tomorrow, despite objections from legal experts and advocates saying she did not receive a fair trial, as well evidence, unseen by the jury during trial, that places her guilt in doubt.
Michelle Byrom, 53, was sentenced to death in 2000 for plotting to murder her abusive husband, Edward Sr. Prosecutors said Michelle masterminded a plan with her son, Edward Jr. (henceforth referred to as “Junior”), and his friend, Joey Gillis, to kill Edward Sr. and collect on his life insurance plan. According to this version of events, the one presented to a jury, Gillis fatally shot Edward Sr. as he slept in his bed on June 4, 1999. Edward Jr. found his dead father and called 911. Questioned by police, he copped to taking part of a conspiracy, orchestrated by his mother Michelle, to murder his father.
As several media outlets—including The Atlantic and The Jackson Free Press—have documented, there are serious holes in that story. The problem is jurors never saw key pieces of evidence casting doubt on Michelle’s guilt, including letters penned by her son confessing to the crime. On top of that, Michelle’s attorneys made several errors throughout her trial that had detrimental consequences on her fate.
Here’s a rundown of the most troubling aspects of Michelle’s case:
Michelle’s son Edward Byrom Jr. confessed multiple times to killing his father. The jury did not hear any of these confessions.
On four different occasions, Edward Jr. confessed that he, not Gillis, pulled the trigger on his father. Three of these confessions came by way of jailhouse letters, smuggled to his mother as she sat on death row. In one letter, Edward Jr. writes that he shot Edward Sr. in a fit of rage after his father hurled insults at him:
I sit in my room for a good 1 1/2-2 hours, and dad comes in my room, and goes off on me, calling me bastard, nogood, mistake, and telling me I'm inconciderate [sic] and just care about my self, and he slaps me, then goes back to his room.
As I sat on my bed, tears of rage flowing, remembering my childhood my anger kept building and building, and I went to my car, got the 9mm, and walked to his room, peeked in, and he was asleep. I walked about 2 steps in the door, and screamed, and shut my eyes, when I heard him move, I started firing. When I opened my eyes again, I freaked! I grabbed what casings I saw, and threw them into the bushes, grabbed the gun, and went to town.
Edward Jr. also admitted to killing his father in a statement given to a court-appointed psychologist. Trial judge Thomas Gardner, who sentenced Michelle to death, was made aware of this statement, according to The Jackson Free Press. But Gardner did not disclose the statement to jurors and also did not permit the confessional letters to be entered into evidence.
Edward Byrom Jr. also admitted to fabricating the alleged murder plot.
One of the key pieces of evidence presented at trial was a statement from Edward Jr. to police. In that statement, Edward Jr. laid out a conspiracy to kill his father, supposedly orchestrated by his mother Michelle and executed by his friend Gillis. But in a letter, Edward Jr. says he completely made up that story:
I was so scared, confused, and high, I just started spitting the first thought out, which turned into this big conspiracy thing, for money, which was all BS, that's why I had so many different stories.
This letter was not presented to jurors as evidence.
Michelle Byrom’s attorneys withheld evidence about her history with domestic abuse and mental illness.
Michelle Byrom had a long history of enduring sexual and domestic abuse. Her stepfather sexually abused her as a child and forced her to work as a prostitute. She entered her relationship with Edward Byrom when she was fifteen years old. He was thirty-one. According to court affidavits, Edward Sr. physically abused his wife and forced her to have sex with other men while he videotaped.
Dr. Keith A Caruso, a psychiatrist who evaluated Michelle, linked her history of abuse to a long list of mental disorders that caused self-destructive behavior. Caruso diagnosed her with depression, alcohol dependence, Borderline Personality Disorder and Munchausen syndrome. He wrote in a post-trial affidavit:
If I had been called to testify at the penalty phase of Michelle Byrom's trial, I would have offered the opinion that … she was inclined to harm herself and act in a self-defeating manner, so that she was psychologically unable to leave the abusive relationship with her husband.
Byrom’s attorneys mentioned her history with abuse and mental illness in their opening statement, but never called on Caruso to testify, believing his testimony would be more effective during an appeal.
Michelle Byrom’s attorneys gave her detrimental legal advice.
Michelle’s legal team, trying their first capital murder case, advised her to waive her right to a jury sentencing, erroneously assuming that it could be unconstitutional. That left her fate up to Judge Gardner, who sentenced her to death.  
Michelle appealed to the state Supreme Court in 2006, on grounds that her attorneys were incompetent. The court rejected her appeal five to three. Dissenting Justice Jess Dickinson wrote, “"I have attempted to conjure up in my imagination a more egregious case of ineffective assistance of cousel during the sentencing phase of a capital case," wrote in his dissent. "I cannot.”

Though Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood requested Michelle’s execution take place tomorrow, the Supreme Court still needs to give its stamp of approval to proceed.
It's unclear whether that will happen. What's clear is Michelle's advocates have laid out a compelling case that her trial was not carried out fairly. On top of that, key evidence suggests she could be innocent. An editorial, published in the the Jackson Free Press last week, made clear what’s at stake: “To execute Michelle Byrom for a crime that she did not commit would be one of the worst miscarriages of justices in modern Mississippi history."

December 13, 2013

Unkie in North Korea Faced the Firing Squad



453266983
A South Korean man watches TV news about the alleged dismissal of Jang Song-Thaek, North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un's uncle, at a railway station in Seoul on December 3, 2013
Photo by Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images














When an uncle becomes more than an uncle, it’s got to go.  This unckie had a lot of say on the past North Korea’s actions.  He got executed according to the untruthful North Korea Media, because he was a womanizer, a drunk gambler and thus deserter in their revolution. Actually all the Dictators of North korea have beeb just that, womanizer, rapist of  any woman or man they want. There are only a few reasons why the no.2 man of this country would be killed along with all his body guards and close friends. 
One is that he was too powerful and baby face thought he had too much. May be he remembered how many times unkie had slopped’m in the back of the head when he was growing up. Actually I make light of this situation because you can’t get sad or hopeful with this guy’s death.  A killer just as bad as his nephew.
May be the nephew wants to be his own man which in case one most wonder doesn’t he have the power to be his own man already?  Obviously not, the kid is felling insecure. In a decade or so Im  sure he will get to know whether this action was smart or it was just igniting of a match where there was none burning. 
Adam Gonzalez, Publisher

The following post is from  on Slate.com:
North Korea state media announced Thursday that Kim Jong Un's uncle—a man who was once considered to be the second most powerful official in the Hermit Kingdon—has been executed for attempting to overthrow the government.
The news came as something of a surprise given Jang Song Thaek's previous role within the government, where he was believed to have helped Kim Jong Un consolidate power after the death of his father two years ago. Still, there had been rumblings of palace trouble, with recent reports suggesting that Jang Song Thaek had already been ousted from his position within Kim Jong Un's inner circle.
The official announcement came via the official North Korean English-language news site, KCNA, which—in its typically superlative-heavy and bombastic fashion—branded Jang Song Thaek everything from a "traitor for all ages" to "despicable human scum" to "worse than a dog." Here's a snippet from the KCNA report:
The accused is a traitor to the nation for all ages who perpetrated anti-party, counter-revolutionary factional acts in a bid to overthrow the leadership of our party and state and the socialist system. ...
He held higher posts than before and received deeper trust from supreme leader Kim Jong Un, in particular. The political trust and benevolence shown by the peerlessly great men of Mt. Paektu were something he hardly deserved. It is an elementary obligation of a human being to repay trust with sense of obligation and benevolence with loyalty.
However, despicable human scum Jang, who was worse than a dog, perpetrated thrice-cursed acts of treachery in betrayal of such profound trust and warmest paternal love shown by the party and the leader for him. From long ago, Jang had a dirty political ambition. He dared not raise his head when Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il were alive. But, reading their faces, Jang had an axe to grind and involved himself in double-dealing. He began revealing his true colors, thinking that it was just the time for him to realize his wild ambition in the period of historic turn when the generation of the revolution was replaced.

According to the Associated Press, Jang Song Thaek’s ouster and unconfirmed execution has some analysts fearing that the purge could create dangerous instability within Kim Jong Un’s already unpredictable government.

.

September 24, 2012

The State Didn’t Care About Abuser Sandusky but Might Execute A kid That Defended Himself

Terry Williams: A victim might be executed

  

At a time when two of Pennsylvania’s largest institutions have been exposed for turning a blind eye to the sexual abuse of children, the state is preparing to execute a victim of child sex abuse for killing his abusers.
In 1984, less than four months after his 18th birthday — the minimum age required for capital punishment — Terrance “Terry” Williams was sentenced to death for the murder of 56-year-old Amos Norwood, a Philadelphia church leader. With the help of 18-year-old Marc Draper, the son of a police officer, Williams smashed Norwood’s skull with a tire iron, set fire to his body and dumped him in a cemetery. Just five months earlier, Williams was convicted of third-degree murder for killing 50-year-old Herbert Hamilton, who was found naked on his kitchen floor with a knife in his throat.
But according to Williams’ lawyers, both the jury and defense were deliberately kept in the dark about the true motive behind the killings — the sexual abuse Williams, now 46, endured at the hands of Hamilton and Norwood. At the time, Williams now says, he was too ashamed to admit the abuse. Now he says he was violently raped by Norwood the night before the murder. Five of the jurors that sentenced Williams to death have testified that they never would have done so had they known about Williams’ history of childhood sexual abuse — and had they known that his victims were also his abusers.
As Williams’ Oct. 3 execution nears, his attorneys are scrambling to save his life. On Monday, the Pennsylvania Board of Pardons rejected a clemency petition. Though the five-member board voted 3-to-2 in favor of clemency, unanimous approval is required for the governor to consider halting the execution. Williams’s lawyers have since asked the Board of Pardons to reconsider, citing an allegedly inaccurate statement made by assistant district attorney Thomas Dolgenos, though it’s unclear whether board rules allow for reconsideration.
Williams’ life currently rests in the hands of Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge M. Teresa Sarmina, who has the power to grant an emergency stay of execution. Victor Abreu, one of Williams’ attorneys, tells Salon, “The state knew the real motive for the killing and yet presented evidence that was false.” Sarmina is currently reviewing whether this is indeed the case At a time when two of Pennsylvania’s largest institutions have been exposed for turning a blind eye to the sexual abuse of children, the state is preparing to execute a victim of child sex abuse for killing his abusers.
In 1984, less than four months after his 18th birthday — the minimum age required for capital punishment — Terrance “Terry” Williams was sentenced to death for the murder of 56-year-old Amos Norwood, a Philadelphia church leader. With the help of 18-year-old Marc Draper, the son of a police officer, Williams smashed Norwood’s skull with a tire iron, set fire to his body and dumped him in a cemetery. Just five months earlier, Williams was convicted of third-degree murder for killing 50-year-old Herbert Hamilton, who was found naked on his kitchen floor with a knife in his throat.
But according to Williams’ lawyers, both the jury and defense were deliberately kept in the dark about the true motive behind the killings — the sexual abuse Williams, now 46, endured at the hands of Hamilton and Norwood. At the time, Williams now says, he was too ashamed to admit the abuse. Now he says he was violently raped by Norwood the night before the murder. Five of the jurors that sentenced Williams to death have testified that they never would have done so had they known about Williams’ history of childhood sexual abuse — and had they known that his victims were also his abusers.
As Williams’ Oct. 3 execution nears, his attorneys are scrambling to save his life. On Monday, the Pennsylvania Board of Pardons rejected a clemency petition. Though the five-member board voted 3-to-2 in favor of clemency, unanimous approval is required for the governor to consider halting the execution. Williams’s lawyers have since asked the Board of Pardons to reconsider, citing an allegedly inaccurate statement made by assistant district attorney Thomas Dolgenos, though it’s unclear whether board rules allow for reconsideration.
Williams’ life currently rests in the hands of Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge M. Teresa Sarmina, who has the power to grant an emergency stay of execution. Victor Abreu, one of Williams’ attorneys, tells Salon, “The state knew the real motive for the killing and yet presented evidence that was false.” Sarmina is currently reviewing whether this is indeed the case.
At the time of the trial, the prosecution alleged that the killing was motivated by robbery, using the testimony of Draper, Williams’ co-defendant, as proof. But Draper, also now 46, has recanted his testimony and says that he told homicide detectives and then prosecutor Andrea Foulkes on multiple occasions that Williams was motivated by sexual abuse, not robbery.
In an evidentiary hearing held on Thursday, Sarmina listened to nine hours of testimony from Draper and Foulkes, now a federal prosecutor.
Draper, who was convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison without parole for his role in Norwood’s killing, says he was promised a shot at parole in exchange for testifying that robbery was the motive. He also contends that Foulkes promised to write a letter to the parole board on his behalf.
Foulkes called Draper’s claim that she ignored evidence of sexual abuse and instructed him to change his testimony “a complete lie,” though she acknowledges having written a letter for him to the parole board in 1988. The hearing is scheduled to continue on Monday.
Ironically, it is Pennsylvania’s Republican Gov. Tom Corbett — under fire by some critics for how long it took to bring charges against former Penn State football assistant coach Jerry Sandusky when Corbett was state attorney general — who signed Williams’ death warrant in early August. Some critics have said that Corbett deliberately understaffed an investigation team, so much so that it took three years to arrest Sandusky, during which more children were likely abused.
As a result, it will be interesting to see whether Corbett chooses to intervene on behalf of Williams, a popular high school quarterback and also a victim of sex abuse whose abusers, like Sandusky, appear to have been repeatedly ignored despite being suspected of wrongdoing.
Marc Bookman, executive director of the Atlantic Center for Capital Representation in Philadelphia, tells Salon that, “If there is any state that has a sense of what sexual abuse does to someone, it’s Pennsylvania.” Bookman says he is “cautiously optimistic” that the state will spare Williams. “I would hope that the governor’s experience in the Sandusky case would make him more sensitive and more understanding of the incredible trauma that Terry Williams underwent.”
Despite declarations of sympathy for child victims of sex abuse by Pennsylvania’s politicians and bureaucrats, the prosecution has elected to blame Williams for failing to raise the issue of sexual abuse at his trial. “Instead,” says deputy district attorney Ronald Eisenberg, “[Williams] chose to present false testimony that he wasn’t there.” However, Williams lawyers explain that the reason it took Williams so long to reveal his abused history is because he was frightened and ashamed, as are most child victims of rape.
On another occasion, Eisenberg called Williams’ plea for clemency a “massive public relations campaign.” Eisenberg’s remarks echo the prosecution’s belief that Williams’ alleged abuse is unimportant in deciding whether he lives or dies. In a statement following the rejection of clemency, district attorney Seth Williams accused Terry Williams “of manipulative and malevolent behavior,” calling his claims of sexual abuse “a last ditch effort to escape punishment for his crime.”
Shawn Nolan, another one of Williams attorneys, has expressed outrage at the prosecution’s argument, saying in a statement, “It is unconscionable that district attorney Seth Williams, who considers himself an advocate and defender of victims of abuse, has allowed prosecutors to characterize the evidence in this case as a ‘gay prostitute rage defense.’”
As a child, Williams was no stranger to abuse by older men in positions of authority. The clemency petition filed by Williams’ attorneys describes his childhood as wrought with “abuse, neglect and deprivation,” which “made him an easy mark for sexual predators.” His mother was cruel and abusive, and his stepfather was a violent alcoholic. The sexual abuse Williams suffered began at the age of six, when he was raped by an older boy in his neighborhood. “He came home in tears, bleeding from his rectum. Terry reported the assault to his mother, who saw the blood on his backside but never even sought medical attention for her son, let alone counseling or mental health treatment,” states the clemency petition. Later, Williams was raped by his middle school teacher, Timothy Johnson, and at 16, he was gang raped by two older men in juvenile detention.
Hamilton and Amos, the men Williams ultimately killed, are described in the petition as “middle-aged sexual predators who preyed on teenage boys.” Hamilton, a prescription drug dealer, abused many teenage boys, one of whom testified in the petition. According to Williams’ defense, his attempted abuse of Williams resulted in a knife fight that ended with Hamilton’s death.
In an unprecedented outpouring of support, 36 child advocates and sexual abuse experts, 38 law professors, 48 mental health professionals, 55 religious leaders and 36 former prosecutors and judges are calling on the state of Pennsylvania to spare the life of Terrance Williams. Mamie Norwood, the elderly widow of Amos Norwood, one of the men Williams killed, is also among those calling for clemency, saying, “His execution would go against my Christian faith and my belief system.”
Furthermore, over 350,000 people have signed a petition at Change.org urging clemency. The European Union has even chimed in with an “urgent humanitarian appeal” to Corbett and the Board of Pardons, calling the case “particularly distressing because he has been reported to have been sexually abused by the person whom he murdered, a fact which appears not to have been taken into account during his trial.”
Meanwhile, in a letter sent to Corbett and the Board of Pardons, over two-dozen child advocates and sexual abuse experts argue that Williams’ actions were a direct result of sexual abuse. “Terry’s acts of violence have, alas, an explanation of the worst sort: Enveloped by anger and self-hatred, Terry lashed out and killed two of the men who sexually abused him and caused him so much pain,” they say. “Terry was left alone to develop the means to deal with the horrors of his daily life.” The letter continues:
His crimes are an undeniable reflection of this internal suffering and are directly connected to his history of abuse and trauma. The violence of his crimes is a window into the true agony with which he struggled. We are saddened by what could have become of Terry Williams’ life had someone, anyone, intervened on his behalf.
The letter also points to the significance of understanding the effects of child sex abuse in the wake of Pennsylvania’s recent sex abuse scandals involving Jerry Sandusky and the Catholic Church, saying, “In our Commonwealth, we have seen very public and analogous examples of this phenomenon as major institutions in Pennsylvania have come under scrutiny regarding the sexual abuse of children.”
Though Pennsylvania has the nation’s fourth highest number of death row inmates, prisoners are rarely executed due to a high reversal rate, making the notion that Williams is among the worst of the worst and is deserving of death absurd in the eyes of his advocates. Only three people have been executed since the state reinstated capital punishment in 1978. Williams would mark the first Pennsylvania execution in 13 years as well as the state’s first non-volunteer execution since 1962.
BY 

Featured Posts

Supreme Court orders Deutsche and Capital 1 Banks Most Comply With Congress and Release Trump/Fam Records

 The guy for the common man that steals and does not wants to get caught but finds a brother in arms with similar views fro...