August 31, 2016

18 Yr Arrested in Dubai for Not Looking Straight


Note to Dubai: There is no LGBT test because being Gay is not a decease!





The Instagram charts his frequent travels from his native Poland to glamorous locations around the world, like Dubai, London, and Los Angeles. But when Luxy (who used his first name only for safety reasons) posted in June that he was headed to Qatar, what would have been just another shopping-filled fantasy turned into a total nightmare.

"I was taken to jail straight from Doha Hamad airport," Luxy told the Daily Dot in an email on Monday. "At passport control, they looked at me with angry faces and said something is wrong, that I have visa problems and I was detected in their system (or so they said)."

At the airport, Luxy said security took him to an interrogation room and searched his phone, looking through photos and messages in WhatsApp and other apps. He said security asked him if he was a man or a woman and arrested him shortly afterward. He claimed was accused of homosexuality (which is illegal in Qatar), indecency, and cyber crime. In jail, he said, police repeatedly mocked him and accused him of being a prostitute. Luxy said he doesn't even identify as gay.

 
Luxy said that during the first 10 days in jail, his arrest was not recorded and he wasn't allowed to contact anyone.

"They reported me as missing in Poland," Luxy told the Daily Dot. "The embassy couldn't find me in Doha because my arrest was not registered anywhere. I was arrested by people in private clothes and put into a private car. It felt like being kidnapped."

According to Luxy, once the Polish embassy was notified of his arrest, he was given a lawyer and eventually released, on August 18, almost two months after his June 27 arrest. Luxy shared his arrest papers with the Daily Dot for verification.

After finally getting out of jail, as the Instagrammer told Gay Star News, he was almost immediately arrested again: "For wearing makeup on Snapchat and Instagram. They said I am a woman and I look like a 'she-male.'"

Luxy is now safely out of Qatar, but he says he's banned from entering any Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries, like Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates. That means the teen won't be traveling to Dubai any time soon.

Homosexuality is illegal in all GCC member countries, and in 2013 a Kuwaiti official announced that the GCC was considering issuing a controversial "gay test" for foreign visitors suspected of being LGBT. No medically approved test to detect homosexuality actually exists.

Currently, about 73 nations around the world have laws that criminalize homosexuality.

Update 8:08am CT, August 30: The Embassy of the Republic of Poland in Doha confirmed the following to the Daily Dot: "A Polish national nicknamed Luxy, aged 18, was detained at Hamad International Airport in Doha on 27 June 2016 on a charge of money extortion, blackmail, and assault on a Qatari national’s privacy online (cyber-related offense)—and not of being homosexual or because of a minor visa irregularities. His arrest has not been reported to the Polish consular services by the Qatari Police (which is by and large a standard practice in Qatar), until the detainee’s family information at the beginning of July. It is to be noted that Polish consular service has never reported Mr. Luxy missing." The embassy also wrote that his “arrest conditions were decent and correct" and "no irregular behaviour of any police officer has been reported by the detainee to the consul."

Mexico Looses Juan Gabriel (Juanga) its own Liberace


 ‘Juanga’ in 2015



With his glittery capes, slinky dance moves and ultra-romantic lyrics, Mexican superstar Juan Gabriel was an unlikely king in a country known for its machismo. He never spoke about his sexuality, yet was widely assumed to be gay.
It’s no surprise that the singer was an icon in Mexico’s gay subculture. But how was it that he came to be celebrated by the country’s Catholic, conservative and often homophobic mainstream?
Juan Gabriel, whose sudden death Sunday at age 66 cast Mexico into a state of mourning, navigated both worlds by saying nothing at all. 
“It’s his life,” said Ricardo Monroy Martinez, who came to pay his respects Monday at a statue of the performer in Mexico City’s Plaza Garibaldi, where fans were gathered, singing. Juan Gabriel’s sexuality wasn’t important, Monroy said, and he never felt the singer needed to articulate it. What mattered were the songs. “They reached my heart,” said the 63-year-old.
Juan Gabriel, the stage name he preferred to his given name, Alberto Aguilera Valadez, remained coy about his private life from the 1960s, when he started his career singing on the streets of Juarez. He maintained that posture into his later years despite a shift in public opinion on gay and transgender rights. 
 He never married, conceived four children via artificial insemination with a female friend and repeatedly refused to answer questions about his sexuality, even after a male former personal secretary wrote a book alleging they had a romantic relationship.
In 2002, a few years years before Mexico City legalized gay marriage, the famously effeminate singer shut down a journalist who asked if he was gay.
“You don’t ask about what can be seen,” he said.
Like the flamboyant pianist Liberace, who some say maintained that he was straight out of fear that the truth would hurt his appeal to mainstream America, Juan Gabriel’s stance could in part be viewed as a business decision.
“It would have been a career killer to come out,” said Hector Carrillo, who grew up in Mexico and is now a professor of sociology at Northwestern University. “That was part of the calculation for people who had a very public persona.... They would never name it. They would never say it. It was a strategy of silence.”
“Don't ask, don't tell” had long been the policy in Mexico when it came to the sexuality of those in the limelight. Famed Mexican singer Chavela Vargas waited until 2002, when she was 81, to publicly come out as a lesbian. Although Gabriel never publicly claimed the gay community, that community certainly claimed him, with his romantic Spanish-language ballads belted late into the night in drag bars on both sides of the border. Many gay fans saw coded messages in the lyrics of Juan Gabriel’s songs, such as “Es Mi Vida” (“It’s My Life.”)
It’s my life, very much my life, and I don’t have to give any explanations. 
I have my reasons, which no one will care to know.
Many have credited Juan Gabriel with opening the door to greater expression of gender and sexuality, even if he never explicitly called for it. Like Prince, or David Bowie, Juan Gabriel was known for his gender-bending clothing and occasional touch of eye makeup.
“I think he made a deep cultural change not by talking about his sexuality but by living it out on stage,” said Alejandro Madrazo, a law professor in Mexico who is an expert on the legal battle for same-sex marriage in the country. “Juan Gabriel taught us how to be feminine.”
Madrazo recalled seeing Juan Gabriel perform before a large crowd at at cockfight, a sport that exemplifies Mexico’s machismo culture.  
“He would dance in a way that was sexy and provocative in front of all these stereotypes of a Mexican man,” Madrazo said. “He would literally shake ... in their faces, and they would go crazy.”
Madrazo said he thinks Juan Gabriel never opened up about his sexuality because there may have not been just one label that fit him. “I think his sexuality was probably far more complex,” he said.
In an homage to Juan Gabriel published on the website of Mexico’s Millenio newspaper Monday, journalist Alvaro Cueva recalled friends making fun of Juan Gabriel for his effeminate stage presence. At some schools, his name was used as an anti-gay slur.
Cueva called Juan Gabriel subversive. “You ... became an idol in a country of macho men,” he wrote. “You made homophobic people sing and dance.”
Mexico has changed considerably from the days Juan Gabriel was beginning his career.  

In 2005, the federal government instituted an anti-homophobia campaign. Gay and lesbian characters now appear on Mexican sitcoms and soap operas. And public opinion polls show Mexican people are warming toward gay marriage, which is legal in several states and Mexico City.   
“Mexico got ahead of him,” said Carrillo. “Homosexuality kind of came out of the closet, but Juan Gabriel never did.”
While Juan Gabriel himself shied away from political causes, some in Mexico are using his death as an opportunity to push for the legalization of same-sex marriage nationwide.
Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has championed that cause and is seeking congressional approval to amend the country’s constitution. But his plan has been met with fierce resistance from church leaders and even officials in his own party. 
“Mexicans are crying for Juan Gabriel,” newspaper columnist Yuriria Sierra wrote on Twitter. “But they would continue to deny the legal right to love.”

Kate Linthicum

Trump’s New CEO Bannon Addressed Working Women as Dykes

 

Donald Trump has cycled through a series of campaign leaders, each brought on to remedy the Republican nominee’s head-spinning presidential bid, but each turning into a headache himself. The latest campaign savior turned liability is former Breitbart News executive Stephen Bannon, who Trump named his campaign C.E.O. earlier this month. The campaign shake-up, which included the elevation of G.O.P. pollster Kellyanne Conway to campaign manager, was at the time seen as both a slight and solution to Paul Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chairman, who was drawing unwanted attention over his controversial business ties to Russia and Ukraine. But in the two weeks since Bannon took the helm, Trump’s campaign has been rocked by a string of allegations against the media firebrand, including a decades-old domestic-abuse charge. And the bad press isn’t stopping.

The latest of Bannon’s past transgressions to come to light is a comment he made in a five-year-old interview, in which he calls progressive women “dykes.” In a 2011 radio interview with Political Vindication Radio, Bannon said that conservative women—such as Ann Coulter, Michele Bachmann, and Sarah Palin—are an “existential threat to the progressive narrative” and as a result “there are some unintended consequences of the women’s liberation movement. That, in fact, the women that would lead this country would be pro-family, they would have husbands, they would love their children,” he said, as BuzzFeed News first reported. “They wouldn’t be a bunch of dykes that came from the Seven Sisters schools up in New England. That drives the left insane and that’s why they hate these women,” Bannon continued.

The newly surfaced remark by Trump’s campaign C.E.O. is just one of several past controversial comments that have recently surfaced. Days before BuzzFeed News published the 2011 radio recording, the outlet reported that Bannon’s ex-wife had accused him of making anti-Semitic comments, citing court filings from the estranged couple’s divorce proceedings. “He said that he doesn’t like Jews and that he doesn’t like the way they raise their kids to be ‘whiny brats’ and that he didn’t want the girls to go to school with Jews,” Bannon’s ex-wife, Mary Louise Piccard, reportedly claimed in the filings. (A spokesperson for Bannon told BuzzFeed that he never made the comments.) Earlier, Politico published a police report filed against the former media executive, wherein his then wife, Piccard, detailed an alleged domestic-violence incident in which she claimed Bannon grabbed her neck and broke her phone. Bannon was charged with battery, dissuading a witness, and misdemeanor domestic violence in 1996, but the charges against him were dropped when Piccard didn’t show up in court, Politico reports. (A spokesperson told Politico that Bannon pleaded not guilty to the charges and was never interviewed by the police.)

As Bannon’s past has come back to haunt him, the Trump campaign has begun to distance itself from the chief executive. When asked about Bannon and his connections to the controversial “alt-right” movement in an interview on Fox News Sunday this past weekend, Conway remarked that Trump “chose me to manage his campaign, and I report directly to him.” Chairman of the Republican National Committee Reince Priebus evinced a similar ambivalence toward Bannon in an interview with NBC’s Meet the Press. “I think Kellyanne is doing a phenomenal job. I don’t know Steve Bannon, to tell you the truth, very well,” he said when asked about personnel issues within the Trump campaign. If Bannon’s troubles continue, he, like his predecessors Manafort and Corey Lewandowski, might not last long on the Trump campaign.

August 30, 2016

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FBI Alert on Cyber Attack! States Worry About Attacks on Voting Systems










The FBI’s decision to issue a nationwide alert about the possible hacking of state election offices after breaches in Illinois and Arizona is raising concerns that a nationwide attack could be afoot, with the potential for creating havoc on Election Day.
It’s possible that the motivation behind the two state hacks was less about the political system and more about cash. Voter registration data sets include valuable information — such as names, birth dates, phone numbers and physical and email addresses — that criminal hackers can bundle and flip on the black-market “dark web” for thousands of dollars.
Story Continued Below

But some cyber experts said the FBI’s alert, first revealed by Yahoo News on Monday, could be a sign that investigators are worried that foreign actors are attempting a wide-scale digital onslaught.
A former lead agent in the FBI’s Cyber Division said the hackers’ use of a particular attack tool and the level of the FBI’s alert “more than likely means nation-state attackers.” The alert was coded “Amber,” designating messages with sensitive information that “should not be widely distributed and should not be made public,” the ex-official said.

One person who works with state election officials called the FBI’s memo “completely unprecedented.”
“There’s never been an alert like that before that we know of,” said the person, who requested anonymity to discuss sensitive intergovernmental conversations.
Multiple former officials and security researchers said the cyberattacks on Arizona’s and Illinois’ voter databases could be part of a suspected Russian attempt to meddle in the U.S. election, a campaign that has already included successful intrusions at major Democratic Party organizations and the selective leaking of documents embarrassing to Democrats. Hillary Clinton’s campaign has alleged that the digital attacks on her party are an effort by Russian President Vladimir Putin’s regime to sway the election to GOP nominee Donald Trump. Moscow has denied any involvement.
Hacking state election offices could offer new tools for affecting the outcome of the vote.
Having access to voter rolls, for example, could allow hackers to digitally alter or delete registration information, potentially denying people a chance to vote on Election Day. Or news of the attack could simply fuel further distrust in the U.S. election system, which Trump has repeatedly alleged is “rigged.”

“I think he’s just unleashed the hounds,” said Tom Kellermann, head of Strategic Cyber Ventures, referring to Putin. Kellermann said the intrusions fit the “modus operandi and the ultimate goal” of a long-standing Russian digital intelligence campaign targeting foreign government officials in Europe, the U.S. and elsewhere that Kellermann has been tracking for years, which researchers believe has turned its sights on the American electoral process.

The FBI’s investigations of the Arizona and Illinois attacks have been public knowledge since July, when both states took their voter registration databases offline following detection of the intrusions. But the bureau’s Cyber Division broadened its sweep in an Aug. 18 “flash” alert that warned top election officials in every state about potential foreign intrusions of their election systems. The alert advised officials to look for a series of specific hallmarks of cyberattacks.

In Illinois, officials told Yahoo News that hackers pilfered personal data on up to 200,000 voters. The Arizona digital intruders did not make off with any information, said the news service.
Some cyber experts are skeptical that the attacks on the elections offices had any political motive, noting that hackers often rifle through government databases looking for personal information they can sell.

“It’s got the hallmark signs of any criminal actors, whether it be Russia or Eastern Europe,” said Milan Patel, a former chief technology officer of the FBI’s Cyber Division who is now at the security firm K2 Intelligence. However, he added, “the question of getting into these databases and what it means is certainly not outside the purview of state-sponsored activity.”

Still, little public digital forensic evidence has come to light so far that would link the Illinois and Arizona hackers to a Russian-backed group that researchers say broke into the Democratic National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.
“No robust evidence as of yet,” respected cybersecurity consultant Matt Tait said on Twitter.
The FBI’s alert asked state officials to check whether their networks had seen any activity coming from eight specific Internet Protocol addresses, at least one of which was tied to a Russian cyber gang, according to Yahoo News.

The FBI sent the alert to the Election Assistance Commission, the federal agency that offers help to states in improving the management of their elections. The commission then sent it to state officials, spokesman Bryan Whitener told POLITICO.
The FBI declined to comment on the alert but said in a statement that it “routinely advises private industry of various cyberthreat indicators observed during the course of our investigations.”
Leo Taddeo, a former head of the cyber division in the FBI’s New York office, said such a widespread alert “indicates that this could be a systematic attack, rather than an isolated targeting of a particular database.”
Sending out the memo is the only way for officials to do a complete review of all state election systems and determine whether a “dedicated attack” is taking place on multiple networks, Taddeo added. Elections have always been run at the state and local level, and few if any federal laws govern how local officials manage and secure voter data.

At most, several federal agencies provide voluntary guidelines for local officials. In some states, voter registration information is a public record, meaning data security rules governing the handling of personal information — such as names and home addresses — don’t apply.
The FBI’s alert reflects growing government awareness of the cyberthreat to election systems.
The Department of Homeland Security had held no conversations with states about election cybersecurity until a conference call that Secretary Jeh Johnson held with state officials on Aug. 15, a person involved in state election work said.

That call came together after Johnson publicly floated the idea of classifying elections as “critical infrastructure,” a designation that grants special security assistance to vital facilities such as banks and the power grid. “We hastily reached out to DHS to try to organize a call that would at least give state officials some information on what was going on with DHS,” the person said.

On the call, DHS officials urged states to coordinate with their local FBI offices if they weren’t already doing so. The department also agreed to provide resources to states, including vulnerability-detection software. But the DHS has not provided those resources yet, and some states, such as Georgia, have balked at the offers of assistance, fearful of federal meddling.
DHS plans to announce an election cybersecurity awareness campaign soon, the person said.
A DHS spokesman declined to comment on the FBI alert.

In the meantime, digital voter registration systems appear to be functioning — mostly. Of 42 state databases that POLITICO accessed on Monday, 41 were available, although the entire website of California’s secretary of state was down.
"It is down right now," said Sam Maood, spokesman for the California secretary of state. "There’s no evidence that it’s due to hacking or any kind of data breach."
All but one of the other states either required more extensive measures to check registration or had no evident online system. The one exception, North Dakota, is the only state that doesn’t require voters to register, according to its secretary of state.

But devastating consequences could ensue if these databases fell into the hands of motivated digital attackers, election security specialists said.
“An attacker could potentially remove registered voters from the registration list in areas that are expected to vote against the attacker’s preferred candidate, creating challenges and delays when the voters show up and the polls to vote,” said Jason Straight, chief privacy officer for UnitedLex, which advises corporations on cybersecurity practices.
By ERIC GELLER

Straight called such manipulation a “much greater threat” than the possibility of hackers tampering with electronic voting machines, which election watchdog groups and researchers say are insecure and often lack proper auditing mechanisms.
Tilting elections through voting machines hacks “would require extensive use of on-the-ground operatives with social engineering and technical skills to pull off,” Straight said.
In recent years, voter rolls have become an increasingly attractive target for both cyber gangs, as well as government-backed digital spies, appearing for sale on underground web forums, or simply being found sitting unprotected online.

Hundreds of millions of voters in the U.S., the Philippines, Turkey, Kazakhstan and Mexico have been affected.
The big windfall came last October, when hackers — “probably based in Russia” — started selling a set of Americans' voter data “containing personal information on approximately 190 million persons,” said Christopher Porter, manager of FireEye iSIGHT Intelligence, a leading cybersecurity firm that examined the leak. The information exposed included full names, genders, dates of birth, physical addresses, email address and phone numbers.
The presence of the Russian cyber gang-linked IP address in the FBI alert is a possible indication that these digital thieves were at it again in Illinois and Arizona, said several researchers and a former FBI official.

While such thefts could be the work of ordinary criminals, these same experts explained that Russian cyber gangs often act at the behest of the Kremlin, either directly or indirectly. In exchange, these groups receive immunity from prosecution and “maintain their untouchable status,” said Kellermann, of Cybersecurity Strategic Ventures.
If this is indeed the case with the recent intrusions of state voter registration databases, Kellermann believes the suspected campaign to undermine the U.S. election process is “reaching a tipping point.”
“It’s high time that the U.S. government took off its own gloves,” he said.

 @politico on Twitter | Politico on Facebook

Gene Wilder (Willy Wonka) Dead at 83







The comic actor was at his best in 'The Producers,' 'Blazing Saddles' and 'Young Frankenstein' and teamed with Richard Pryor in four films.
Gene Wilder, the leading man with the comic flair and frizzy hair known for teaming with Mel Brooks on the laugh-out-loud masterpieces The Producers, Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein, has died, his family announced. He was 83.

The two-time Oscar nominee also starred as a quirky candy man in Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971) and in four films alongside stand-up legend Richard Pryor.

Wilder's nephew, Jordan Walker-Pearlman, said that the actor died Sunday night at home in Stamford, Conn., after a three-year battle with Alzheimer's disease.

"The decision to wait until this time to disclose his condition wasn’t vanity," Walker-Pearlman said, "but more so that the countless young children who would smile or call out to him, 'There’s Willy Wonka,' would not have to be then exposed to an adult referencing illness or trouble and causing delight to travel to worry, disappointment or confusion. He simply couldn’t bear the idea of one less smile in the world."

His nephew noted that when Wilder passed, a recording of Ella Fitzgerald singing "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" was playing. She was one of his favorite artists.

Wilder will forever be remembered for his ill-fated Hollywood romance with Gilda Radner. Less than two years after they were married, the popular Saturday Night Live star was diagnosed with ovarian cancer and died on May 20, 1989, at age 42.

READ MORE Gene Wilder Remembered: 5 of His Biggest Movie Roles
In 1963, the Milwaukee native appeared on Broadway opposite Anne Bancroft in Jerome Robbins’ Mother Courage and Her Children. The actress introduced Wilder to Brooks, her future husband, and the couple invited him to Fire Island, where he got a look at the first 30 pages of a screenplay titled Springtime for Hitler.

“Three years went by, never heard from [Brooks],” Wilder told Larry King in a 2002 interview. “I didn’t get a telegram. I didn’t get a telephone call. And I’m doing a play called Love on Broadway, matinee, taking off my makeup.

“Knock-knock on the door, I open the door. There’s Mel. He said, ‘You don’t think I forgot, do you? We’re going to do Springtime for Hitler. But I can’t just cast you. You’ve got to meet [star] Zero [Mostel] first, tomorrow at 10 o’clock.’

“[The next day] the door opens. There’s Mel. He says come on in. ‘Z, this is Gene. Gene, this is Z. And I put out my hand tentatively. And Zero grabbed my hand, pulls me to him and kisses me on the lips. All my nervousness went away. And then we did the reading and I got the part. And everything was fine.”

Springtime for Hitler, of course, would become The Producers (1968), written and directed by Brooks. For his portrayal of stressed-out accountant Leopold Bloom in his first major movie role, Wilder earned an Oscar nomination for best supporting actor.

Brooks cast Gig Young for the part of the washed-up gunfighter The Waco Kid in Blazing Saddles (1974), but the actor, who was an alcoholic, got sick playing his first scene and had to be taken away by ambulance.

“I called Gene and said, 'What do I do?'” Brooks recalled in a 2014 interview with Parade magazine. “Gene said, 'Just get a horse for me to try out and a costume that fits and I’ll do it.' And he flew out and he did it. Saved my life.”

While working on Blazing Saddles, Wilder fiddled with an outline he had written for Young Frankenstein and asked Brooks to do it with him. Wilder played Dr. Frederick Frankenstein, who creates a monster just like his grandfather did, and he and Brooks shared a screenplay Oscar nom for the 1974 classic, released in theaters just 10 months after Blazing Saddles.

(It was Wilder’s idea to have Frankenstein and his monster, played by Peter Boyle, do the song-and-dance number, “Puttin’ on the Ritz.”)

Said Brooks in a statement: "Gene Wilder, one of the truly great talents of our time, is gone. He blessed every film we did together with his special magic. And he blessed my life with his friendship. He will be so missed."

For the 1971 musical fantasy based on Roald Dahl’s 1964 book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Fred Astaire and Joel Grey were recommended for the role of Willy Wonka. But director Mel Stuart wanted Wilder.

“He had been in The Producers, but he wasn’t a superstar,” Stuart told the Washington Post in 2005. “I looked at him and I knew in my heart there could only be one person who could play Willy Wonka. He walked to the elevator after he read and I ran after him and I said, ‘As far as I’m concerned, you’ve got it.’”

Wilder and Pryor — who was a writer on Blazing Saddles — first teamed up on the train comedy Silver Streak (1976), followed by Stir Crazy (1980), See No Evil, Hear No Evil (1989) and Another You (1991), with Wilder writing and directing the latter pair.
 
Wilder was born in Milwaukee as Jerry Silberman on June 11, 1933. His father was a Russian immigrant who imported and sold miniature beer and whiskey bottles. His mother had a heart attack when he was 6, leaving her an invalid.

The young boy got his start in comedy by trying to perk up his bedridden mother’s spirits (she died when he was 23).

In high school, Wilder played Willy Loman in his own adaptation of Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman, graduated from the University of Iowa with a B.A. in theater and studied at the Old Vic School in Bristol, England.

While overseas, he became the first American to win the all-school fencing championship, a skill he put to use when he starred as a swashbuckler in Start the Revolution Without Me (1970), directed by Bud Yorkin.

Returning to the U.S., Wilder was drafted into the U.S. Army. While stationed outside of Philadelphia at Valley Forge Medial Hospital — he worked as an aide in a psychiatric ward and helped administer electroshock therapy to patients — he commuted to New York twice a week to study acting with Herbert Berghof.

Following his discharge, he changed his name — Wilder is from Thornton Wilder, Gene is from the main character in the Thomas Wolfe novel Look Homeward, Angel — and studied with Lee Strasberg at the Actors Studio.

In 1961, Wilder landed a part in the off-Broadway play Roots, then played a comic valet on Broadway in Graham Greene’s The Complaisant Lover, for which he earned a Clarence Derwent Award.

He also thrived on the stage in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest as the repressed Billy Bibbit (played by Brad Dourif in the 1975 film adaptation) and as John Quincy Adams, Rutherford B. Hayes and other characters opposite Helen Hayes in The White House.

Wilder made his motion picture debut in Arthur Penn’s Bonnie and Clyde (1967), playing undertaker Eugene Grizzard from Milwaukee who, along with his nervous new bride Velma (Evans Evans, then the wife of director John Frankenheimer), is kidnapped by the outlaws.

Wilder accessed his zanier side as an Irish manure peddler in Quackser Fortune Has a Cousin in the Bronx (1970) and as a doctor with a yen for sheep in Woody Allen’s Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex (1972).
 
Flush with the success of Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein, Wilder made his directorial debut in The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes’ Smarter Brother (1975), which he also wrote and starred in. He went on to write, direct and star in The World’s Greatest Lover (1977), for which he also composed a song performed by Harry Nilsson, and played a bumbling Polish rabbi in the Old West in The Frisco Kid (1979).

On television, Wilder starred as an older father of 4-year-old twins in his short-lived 1994-95 NBC sitcom Something Wilder; portrayed Cash Carter, a community-theater director who solves murders, in a pair of 1999 telefilms for A&E; and won a guest-actor Emmy in 2003 for playing Eric McCormack’s boss on NBC’s Will & Grace.

Twice divorced, Wilder met Radner while they were starring in the comedy Hanky Panky (1982), directed by Sidney Poitier. She was married to Saturday Night Live bandleader G.E. Smith at the time.

Radner divorced Smith, and she and Wilder were wed on Sept. 14, 1984, in the south of France. They appeared together in The Woman in Red (1984) and Haunted Honeymoon (1986) before she was found to have stage 4 ovarian cancer in October 1986.

In 1999, Wilder was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma and treated with radiation and stem cell transplants.

Wilder titled his 2005 memoir, Kiss Me Like a Stranger, something Radner had once said to him. “I had no idea why she said it,” he once offered.

In September 1991, Wilder married his fourth wife, Karen Webb. She was from the New York League for the Hard of Hearing and had coached him in the art of lip reading in preparation for his role as a deaf man in See No Evil, Hear No Evil. She survives him.

Wilder’s sister Corinne died in January.

Gay Teens More Important than Religious Law


                                     


  
California’s ban on gay-conversion therapy for teens survived a free-speech challenge back in 2014. Now it’s survived another challenge claiming that the law targets religiously motivated conduct. The decision is legally correct -- but it’s a much closer case than the appeals court acknowledged. And it raises the extremely tricky question of how the state may regulate a psychiatric practice whose foundations are interwoven with religious beliefs.

The key to the free-speech decision from two years ago was that, California isn’t prohibiting speech per se. It’s outlawing a particular medical practice that happens to be accomplished in part through talking. Whether it’s a good idea or not, state legislatures have the legal authority to prohibit licensed providers from performing ineffective and potentially harmful medical treatments.

In other words, California almost certainly couldn’t ban an adult and a teen from sitting down together and talking to each other in a way that both believed would or could change the teen’s sexual orientation. Such a conversation would count as protected speech, outside the state’s authority to regulate. But when the conversation is instead treated as a medical therapy, it comes within the state’s authority to regulate the practice of medicine -- which is a course of conduct, even when it’s accomplished partly by the use of words.

Once they lost on free-speech grounds, the practitioners of gay-conversion therapy didn’t give up. They mounted a further challenge based on the establishment and free exercise clauses of the Constitution.

One advantage of the second challenge over the first is that it comes closer to capturing the subjective experience and motives of the practitioners of what they call “sexual orientation change efforts.” A 2009 report by the American Psychological Association said that “the population that undergoes SOCE tends to have strongly conservative religious views that lead them to seek to change their sexual orientation.”

The same is probably true for the practitioners of such therapy. In an earlier era, the profession of psychiatry saw homosexuality as a curable disease. But now that the profession has largely abandoned this view, those medical professionals who maintain it are often not coincidentally deeply religious. They accept the biblical prohibition on homosexual conduct as morally binding. And they reason that a good God would not have imposed that prohibition unless it were possible for humans to adapt themselves so as to obey it.

It’s not an accident, therefore, that the religiously oriented Family Research Council, for example, advocates gay-conversion therapy.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit rejected the practitioners’ religion-clause claims pretty summarily. The opinion first rejected the argument that the California ban violates the establishment clause by entangling the government with religion. It doesn’t, said the court, because it only targets clinical therapy. People remain free to pray with teens if they believe this may help them change their sexual orientation. This conclusion is certainly legally correct. The fact that some therapists might pray with patients in their sessions doesn’t mean the state can’t regulate the basic clinical course of conduct.

Then the court took on the more subtle question of whether it should matter that those who seek or perform conversion therapy are religiously motivated. The court admitted that there might be a constitutional problem if the law targeted only religiously motivated conduct. But it said that because the law includes all efforts to change sexual orientation, religiously motivated or otherwise, it doesn’t violate religious liberty. In other words, the court said, there wasn’t sufficient evidence to conclude that the primary effect of the law was to inhibit religion.

This issue is actually more complicated than the court made it sound. Suppose all or nearly all gay-conversion-therapy seekers and practitioners are religiously motivated -- an assumption that isn’t ridiculous. And suppose the state passed a law outlawing the practice on the ground that it was medically harmful -- while fully knowing that the practice is grounded in religious belief. Again, the assumption isn’t a heroic one. Would that violate the free exercise of religion?

The answer is controversial even among religious liberty scholars -- but it could well be yes. Compare a humanitarian ban on kosher or halal slaughter. In my hypothetical example, the legislature would know that believers practice such slaughter for religious reasons. The legislature’s own motives would be to make animal slaughter more humanitarian, say by requiring electrocution to kill the animal faster. Yet the overarching intended effect of the law would be to inhibit a religiously motivated practice. It’s possible that such a law might violate the free exercise clause, even if as written it applied to all slaughter, not just kosher or halal practices.

The point is that, when a social practice like medical therapy or animal slaughter is profoundly intertwined with religious motivation, the government can’t necessarily prohibit it just by saying that its own motives are secular -- even assuming they really are.

Yet the reason the court’s decision was nonetheless correct is that religious liberty isn’t absolute. Provided the state has a compelling interest in prohibiting a harmful practice, it’s allowed to prohibit it. The state could, for example, prohibit religiously motivated child sacrifice or widow-burning. Those practices could be entirely religious in nature -- but the state may still ban them because it has a compelling reason to combat the harm.

There’s a strong reason to believe that gay-conversion therapy for teens who can’t themselves fully consent is harmful. The state has a strong interest in prohibiting a potentially dangerous and unproven medical practice on that ground alone. It’s not that religious liberty isn’t implicated. It’s that it is overcome by other, stronger interests.

Noah Feldman

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners; But it does represents the view of adamfoxie Blog

NYC Gay Man Victim of Hate Crime and Initial “We Don’t Care” by Cop on the Beat






New York City resident and Chicago-native Omar Villalobos was taking a stroll in Manhattan with a friend when he said he heard a man shout a gay slur. 

"Before I could even look up, he struck me right in the forehead, splitting about two-and-a-half inches of a cut above my right eyebrow," Villalobos told NBC OUT. "I put my hand over my right eyebrow, and blood just comes down into my hand." 
 
Upset and injured, Villalobos said he sought assistance from nearby police officers but didn't receive the response he expected. When he reported what had happened, he said one of the officers said, "Go find someone who cares. We're here for terrorist attacks, not homeless people." 
When asked for a comment, an NYPD spokesperson told NBC OUT via email, "On Saturday August 20th at 1655 hours the victim was at 42 Street when an unknown male 40-50 made anti-gay statements and then punched the victim in the eye. He received 6 stitches to his eye. Hate Crime Task Force is investigating and IAB is looking into the incident.” 

"We're still in a country where people are seeing violence based on sexuality and gender identity," Sheryl Chestnut, Director of Community Organizing and Public Advocacy at the Anti-Violence Project, told NBC OUT. She added “street-based" violence against the LGBTQ community is still a "fairly common occurrence." 

The Anti-Violence Project has found there is underreporting of anti-LGBTQ violence in New York, and Chestnut said feeling unsafe about going to police is one reason for this. Survivors of this type of violence often go to LGBTQ organizations to seek out assistance and resources. 

ALAMIN YOHANNES

August 29, 2016

Staten Islanders in NYC are Killing Themselves at Rates of 29 a Yr


 STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- In one decade, 290 Staten Islanders took their own lives -- an average of 29 people per year.
Since 2004, the Department of Mental Health and Hygiene (DOH) has recorded at least 20 suicide-related deaths per year until 2014, the last year that data is available. 
The year with the most recorded suicides was 2012 with 33 suicide-related deaths.
The rate of suicide in New York state also peaked in 2012, with 8.4 deaths per 100,000 New York state residents.
The incidents are intentional suicides, such as self-inflicted gunshot wounds, jumping from a bridge or hanging, for example, as opposed to accidental suicide, such as an unintended drug overdose.
The Office of Chief Medical Examiner (ME) reports that depression, history of schizophrenia and anxiety are common factors that lead to suicide, and that many children of suicide victims deal with at least one mental illness.
Additionally, 23 percent of individuals who have committed suicide made a previous suicide attempt within the past year. 

In comparison to the rest of New York City, the raw number of Staten Islanders who took their own lives is the lowest. 


Queens had the highest number of suicides in 2014, with 141 suicide-related deaths, followed by Manhattan with 138, Brooklyn with 125 and Bronx with 66.
However, Staten Island had the second highest death rate per 100,000 residents in 2014 at 6.1 residents. Queens' death rate per 100,000 residents was also 6.1.
Suicide data by borough NYC.png 
Manhattan was first, with a rate of 8.4 per 100,000 residents; Brooklyn with 4.8 residents and Bronx with 4.6 residents.
DEATH BY HANGING MOST COMMON
Almost one-third of suicides are from hanging and 18 percent result from jumping from a high place, according to a report from the city DOH.
New York City's firearm suicide rate is the lowest among large metropolitan areas, according to recent figures from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).
Suicide methods in New York City vary by gender, the city DOH reports; 93 percent of firearm-related suicides are among men, but 45 percent of women's suicide are by intentional poisoning. 
MEN MORE LIKELY THAN WOMEN 
Recent data from the state Department of Health shows that men are more likely to commit suicide than women.
Intentional Self-Harm NYC 2014.png 
In 2014, 7.1 Staten Island men per 100,000 residents committed suicide, compared to 4.3 women per 100,000 residents. 
SEVEN SUICIDES SO FAR IN 2016
Seven Staten Islanders have taken their lives so far this year, according to Staten Island Advance records. Those reports are of suicides that occur in public places, so the actual number is likey higher.
The victim was identified as John Guattrocchi, 57, of Westerleigh. He was found in flames on a North Shore street on January 17.
He died five days later as a result of injuries from the fire.
Just two days later, a Bay Terrace man took his life in a wooded area of Great Kills.
According to the Deputy Commissioner of Public Information, Richard Thompson, 52, was found hanging dead from a tree in Jack's Pond Bluebelt between Cleveland Avenue and Hillside Terrace on January 19.
In April, Charles Miller, 44, was found in Gateway National Recreation Area in Great Kills with a gunshot wound to the head.
The former Corrections captain penned a 10-page letter to his wife, Alana Miller, which included instructions on the suit he wanted to be buried in.
Miller was set to retire for the Department of Correction next year.
Two months later, an 84-year-old Great Kills man jumped from the upper-level of the Staten Island Mall.
Francesco Colina used a chair, which he dragged from a nearby store, to jump from the second floor on June 28. He landed in front of the Gap on the lower-level of the mall.
Colina was rushed to Staten Island University Hospital in Ocean Breeze in stable condition and was pronounced dead a short time later.
August has been a particularly devastating month on Staten Island; there have been four suicides so far, with three in just one week.
3 young Staten Islanders took their lives this past week
Community shaken amid deaths of 13-, 27- and 38-year-olds.

Milinazzo's disabled vehicle was found on the span of the bridge at 4:30 a.m. that Monday morning, shortly before the morning rush hour.
A suicide note was found on the front seat of the vehicle.
The father of two was reported missing the same day, however, his body wasn't discovered for four days, when a New Jersey fisherman found his body floating in Raritan Bay.
Aracelis Abreu Leung was found unconscious in the back seat of a Buick SUV at 7:42 p.m. on August 10, in the rear parking lot at 66 Old Town Road in Dongan Hills, according to a law enforcement source.
Her lifeless body was discovered by her husband.
Authorities found multiple suicide notes in the back of the Buick, as well as a compressed tank of nitrogen.
The next day, August 11, 13-year-old Daniel Fitzpatrick hanged himself in the attic of his family home. Daniel's older sister discovered his body around 5:30 p.m. that evening.
Fitzpatrick left a suicide note, which the young boy penned in July, stating that he was bullied relentlessly and his school ignored his complaints.
"The teachers [at Holy Angels Catholic Academy] ... they didn't do ANYTHING!" he wrote of being bullied at the school. 
City teens who reported attempting suicide also reported additional mental, physical, and social health risks. For example, 27 percent of teens who attempted suicide reported being bullied online in the past year, according to the city DOH.
A close call came eleven days later, on August 22, when authorities rescued a 17-year-old male bicyclist from the span of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge shortly after midnight.
The Brooklyn teen was threatening suicide at the time, according to a spokeswoman from the NYPD. 
The emotionally disturbed teen was found wandering on the catwalk on the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge.
He was transported to Staten Island University Hospital for evaluation. 

Kristin F. Dalton | kdalton@siadvance.com

ISIS 18 Yr Old Guy Has a Bomb Malfunction During Church Attack

Isis bomber attacks Catholic priest with axe during Sunday Mass
The suspect was taken in for questioning (Picture: EPA)

An Isis suicide bomber attacked a Catholic priest with an axe during Sunday Mass – but failed to set off an explosive device.
The priest, Albert Pandiangan, was injured after he was stabbed in the arm in a church in Medan on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia, police said.
  
However, the 18-year-old attacker was restrained by brave churchgoers who rushed to the priest’s aid.
Pictures from inside the church show a young man covered in blood after the incident.
Local chief detective Nur Fallah said: ‘Somebody tried to kill the priest by pretending to attend the church service and at that time tried to explode something, like a firecracker, but the firecracker didn’t explode, it only fumed.’
Indonesian antibomb squad carry an explosive from the Santo Yosef chuch after a man tried to attack a priest in Medan on August 28, 2016.   A knife-wielding attacker in Indonesia stabbed a Catholic priest and tried to set off an explosive device at a church on, police said, the latest in a string of attacks on religious minorities in the mainly Muslim country. / AFP PHOTO / HAKIM RANGKUTIHAKIM RANGKUTI/AFP/Getty Images
The incident happened during Mass in a packed church (Picture: Getty)
epa05512597 Indonesian mobile brigade policemen stand guard after an attempted suicide bombing by an unidentified man at St. Yoseph Catholic Church in Medan, Indonesia, 28 August 2016. An unidentified man attempted a suicide bombing with a small bomb and only injured himself, with no other casualties reported.  EPA/STR
Armed soldiers stood guard after the attack (Picture: EPA)

The drama unfolded when the teenager left a bench, ran towards the priest and allegedly attempted to detonate a bomb in his backpack, national police spokesman Maj. Gen. Boy Rafli Amar said.
Fallah described it as a ‘homemade explosive device’.
  
He then attacked Mr Pandiangan, 60, who was taken to hospital with slight injuries.
Eyewitness Markus Harianto Manullan said: ‘He sat in the same row as I did. I saw him fiddling with something in his jacket, and then I heard a small explosion and he immediately ran to the podium.’
Police have interrogated the teenager.


Metro.co.uk 

A Pastor’s Son More Important than Empty Words About Love



Drew and Danny Cortez, on a recent visit with StoryCorps in Cypress, Calif.
StoryCorps
The Rev. Danny Cortez is a pastor. He also has a son who recently came out as gay. And when his teenage son came out to him in 2014, he did something more than express his support: He decided to talk to his Southern Baptist congregation about it — even though doing so likely meant getting kicked out of the church.
"That morning I came to church, my blood pressure was super high. I felt so much stress, and everyone was wondering what's going on," Cortez recalls, on a recent visit with StoryCorps. "But I remember as I was speaking, I felt empowered like I hadn't felt in such a long time. I knew that what I was sharing that Sunday was important."
What's more, his son Drew was there in the pews to listen.
"I felt vulnerable," Drew says. "I just remember thinking what was going to happen after this. This is our life now."
At the time, Danny told his congregation about the moment his son came out:
"I was driving my son Drew to school, and he turned over to me and he says, 'Dad, I'm gay.' I remember I just turned around and I hugged him so hard. And I said, 'I love you so much, son.' ...
"And so when I was asked a question recently, 'How does it feel to know that you might be terminated in a few weeks?' I said, 'I'm at peace. I'm at peace because I know my heart has been enlarged.' "
"When I sat down," Danny says in his StoryCorps conversation, "I felt like this weight had just been lifted out of me, and people knew where we stood."

At the same time, he says he kept in mind the fact that his son's struggle has been more difficult than this own. Drew, for his part, says he often felt regarded as a problem — even hearing his name paired with the word "abomination" in the same sentence.
"As a father it was so difficult to hear that, because we felt like they didn't know our son," Danny says.
"There's part of me that says, yes, I want to love people that disagree with me, who disagree with us. But the other part of me now is asking, 'But how can I do it in way that honors you?' "
As a result of Danny's sermon, the congregation split. Danny and other members went on to form an LGBT-inclusive, nondenominational church, separate from the Southern Baptist Conference.
Audio produced for Weekend Edition by John White.
StoryCorps is a national nonprofit that gives people the chance to interview friends and loved ones about their lives. These conversations are archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, allowing participants to leave a legacy for future generations. Learn more, including how to interview someone in your life, at StoryCorps.org.

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